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September 18, 2006 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-09-18

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2A - The Michigan Daily - Monday, September 18, 2006

413 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor, MI 48104-1327
www.inichigandaily.com
DoNN M. FRESARD ALEXIS FLOYD
Editor in Chief Business Manager
fresard@michigandaily.com business@michigandaily.com

NEWS IN BRIEF
U.S. military holds AP photographer
The U.S. military in Iraq has imprisoned an Associated Press photographer for
five months, accusing him of being a security threat but never filing charges or
permitting a public hearing.
Military officials said Bilal Hussein, an Iraqi citizen, was being held for "imper-
ative reasons of security" under United Nations resolutions. AP executives said the
news cooperative's review of Hussein's work did not find anything to indicate inap-
propriate contact with insurgents, and any evidence against him should be brought
to the Iraqi criminal justice system.
Hussein, 35, is a native of Fallujah who began work for the AP in September
2004. He photographed events in Fallujah and Ramadi until he was detained on
April 12 of this year.
"We want the rule of law to prevail. He either needs to be charged or released.
Indefinite detention is not acceptable," said Tom Curley, AP's president and chief
executive officer. "We've come to the conclusion that this is unacceptable under
Iraqi law, or Geneva Conventions, or any military procedure."

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EDITORIAL STAFF
Jeffrey Bloomer Managing Editor bloomer@michigandaily.com
Karl Stampfl Managing News Editor sramyfi@michiasdaity.com
NEWS EDITORS Lea hab ksi China H ldreh, Anne Doling, Anne VanderMey
Emily Beam Editorial Page Editor beam@michigandaily.com
Christopher Zbrozek Editorial Page Editor zbrozek@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Whitney Dibo, Theresa Kennelly, David Russell, Iran Syed
Jack Herman Managing Sports Editor herman@michigandaily.com
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Scott Bell, H. Jose Bosch, Matt Singer, Kevin Wright, Stephanie Wright
SPORTSNIGHT EDITORS:In Bromwich,AmberCovin,M0arkGiannotto, Dan Levy,IanRobinson,NateSandal.
Evan Mcarvey Managing Arts Editor mcgarvey@michigandaily.com
Bernie Nguyen Managing Arts Editor sgsyes@michigasdaily.com
ASSOCIATE ARTS EDITORS :Ki erly Cho, Andrew Sargus Kein g
ARTSSUBEDITORS:11*H.C01a ,Caiin Cwan,Pnit >,risinlaDonak
Alex Dziadosz Managing Photo Editor dziadosz@michigandaily.com
Mike Hulsebus Managing Photo Editor hulsebus@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATEPOTO EiITORS:ost Ca, Trevor Campbell, Peter Schotenfels
ASSSTANT HOTODTOl : 10 05 5 hi, Eb n11.5.,,so
Bridget O'Donnell Assistant Managing Editor, Design odonnell@michigandaily.com
ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITOR: Lisa Gent tic
Phil Dokas Managing Online Editor dokas@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE ONLINE EDITORS: Angela Cesere
James V. Dowd Magazine Editor dowd@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATEMAGAZINE EDITOR: Chris Gaerig
BUSINESS STAFF
Robert Chin Display Sales Manager
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ASSISTANTCLASSIFIEDSALES MANAGER M ae IMoe
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The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms
by students at the University ofMichigan. One copy is available free of charge to all readers. Additional
copies may be picked up at the Daily's office for $2. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September, via
U.S. mail are $110. Wintersterm (January through April) is $115, yearlong (September through Aprl) is
$195. University affiliates are subject to a reduced subsiption rate. On-campus subscriptions for fall term
are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid. The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and The
Associated Collegiate Press.

Pope Benedict XVI raises his arms during the
Angelus address to the faithful in his summer
palace in Castel Gandolfo, on the outskirts of
Rome, yesterday.
Pope says sorry
for Ire:Mark
Some Muslim leaders accept
Benedict's explanation, but
others say it's not enough
VATICAN CITY (AP) - Pope Benedict XVI
said Sunday that he is "deeply sorry" his remarks on
Islam and violence offended Muslims, but the unusual
expression of papal regret drew a mixed reaction from
Islamic leaders as the Vatican worried about a back-
lash of violence.
Some Muslim leaders accepted the statement. Oth-
ers said it wasn't enough, but urged Muslims to avoid
violence after attacks on churches in Palestinian areas
and the slaying of a nun in Somalia.
Benedict said he regretted causing offense with his
speech last week in Germany, particularly his quot-
ing of a medieval text that characterized some of the
teachings of Islam's founder as "evil and inhuman"
and referred to spreading Islam "by the sword."
He said those words did not reflect his own opinions.
"I hope that this serves to appease hearts and to clar-
ify the true meaning of my address, which in its totality
was and is an invitation to frank and sincere dialogue,
with great mutual respect" the pope said during his
weekly Sunday appearance before pilgrims.
It was an unusual step for a leader of the Roman
Catholic Church. Benedict's predecessor, Pope John
Paul II, issued a number of apologies during his papa-
cy, but they dealt with abuses and other missteps by
the church in the past rather than errors on his own
part.
Vatican officials had earlier sought to placate
spreading Muslim anger by saying Benedict held Islam
in high esteem and stressed that the central thrust of
his speech was to condemn the use of any religious
motivation for violence, whatever the religion.
While Benedict expressed regret his speech caused
hurt, he did not retract what he said or say he was sorry
he uttered what proved to be explosive words.
Anger was still intense in Muslim lands.
Two churches were set on fire in the West Bank,
raising to at least seven the number of church attacks
in Palestinian areas over the weekend blamed on out-
rage sparked by the speech.

LUGOFF, S.C.
Kidnapped girl sends text message to mother
A man suspected of kidnapping a 14-year-old girl and keeping her in an under-
ground bunker was charged yesterday with raping the teen, Kershaw County Sher-
iff Steve McCaskill said.
Kershaw County Sheriff Steve McCaskill said Vinson Filyaw had eluded police
with an elaborate system of hideouts and bunkers since November 2005 when he t
was charged with criminal sexual conduct on a 12-year-old girl.
He surrendered yesterday morning to police as he walked along Interstate 20
near Columbia, about five miles from where investigators found the teenager.
Police say Filyaw, 36, abducted the girl as she walked home from a school bus
stop on Sept. 6.
Investigators arrested Filyaw in neighboring Richland County about 24 hours
after rescuing the girl, who sent a text message to her mother on Filyaw's phone
while he was a sleep Wednesday, McCaskill said.
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.
Space station bids farewell to first guests
The international space station's three residents bade farewell to one set of house-
guests yesterday and prepared for the arrival of more visitors.
The send-off of space shuttle Atlantis's six astronauts yesterday was the start of a
week of heavy traffic at the space station, the equivalent of rush hour in space.
A Russian Soyuz vehicle ferrying two new station crew members and the first
female space tourist was set to launch overnight, followed by the departure of a Rus-
sian cargo ship from the station on Monday. The Soyuz was scheduled to arrive at
the space station early Wednesday, and Atlantis was set to land at the Kennedy Space
Center in Florida later that day.
KIRKUK, Iraq
Series of bombings strike Kirkuk, killing 24
Six bombs killed 24 people and wounded 84 yesterday in Kirkuk, a northernoil city
the Kurds want added to their self-ruled region. The violence came as politicians argued
over federation legislation that a Sunni Arab party warned could tear Iraq apart.
The tortured bodies of 15 people were found elsewhere, probable victims
of worsening sectarian reprisals, and the U.S. military announced that a sailor
assigned to the Marines died Saturday from wounds suffered during combat in
Iraq's restive Anbar province.
A joint U.S.-Iraqi operation in Diwaniyah rounded up 32 people suspected of
terrorism.
CORRECTIONS - Compiledfrom Daily wire reports
A caption accompanying a series of photos on the front page of Friday's paper mis-
identified one of the photographers. The photos were taken by Jeremy Cho.
Please report any error in the Daily to corrections@michigandaily.com.

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