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September 14, 2006 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-09-14

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Thursday, September 14, 2006 - The Michigan Daily - 11A
[,.||9j||||Engineer Fox leads Stickers

By Andy Reid
For the Daily
Some would say that being an engi-
neering major is impressive enough.
Others would say that leading the
entire Michigan field hockey team in
points is impressive.
But not only can senior captain
Mary Fox claim both of these, she also
displays an invaluable characteristic
that is essential to any sports team:
leadership.
After a Big Ten tournament cham-
pionship and an impressive showing
in the NCAA Tournament - losing
to Old Dominion in the second round
- last season, the Wolverines have
some lofty goals. With a nonconfer-
ence schedule that includes four top-
10 teams, the squad is off to a rough
2-5 start.
This year's freshman class was one of
the best recruiting classes in the nation,
and the new athletes, though talented,
need leadership. Fox has taken the
responsibility on her shoulders.
"I really want to see the same level
of success this year," Fox said. "We

want to win the Big Ten tournament,
and we want to make it through the
Big Ten regular season undefeated for
an outright championship"
Fox said she feels more pressure to
perform and provide leadership as a
senior captain. But she's proven that
she can handle it, taking initiative to
make sure that the freshmen became
acclimated to the team, fitness tests
and college life in general.
"From the very first day we moved
in, Mary has been an amazing leader,"
freshman Alissa Pullos said. "She
really goes out of her way to help her
teammates. She's even helped me with
my calculus homework."
Fox - who started playing field
hockey as a freshman in high school
when she promised a friend that she
would attend tryouts with her - has
become a leader by example both on
and off the field.
"Mary is a great example of success
on the field and in the classroom,"
senior Jill Civic said. "She is one of
the most physically fit members of the
team, has one of the heaviest course
loads and does it all while willingly

volunteering her time to help anyone
on the team with anything from a fit-
ness test to a chemistry test."
Fox isn't discouraged by the Wol-
verines' disappointing 2-5 start to the
season.
"We just have to keep each other
positive," Fox said. "The most impor-
tant thing is keeping the team chem-
istry going because all of us get along
so well. We just have to keep work-
ing hard and everything will fall into
place."
Fox doesn't hesitate to display her
pride leading the field hockey team.
"I know it sounds cliche, but wear-
ing the block 'M' is a pretty big deal
for me," Fox said. "I consider it to be
one of the greatest accomplishments
of my life so far."
Fox, who plans on getting her Master's
degree in engineering, said that if given
the opportunity, she would love to con-
tinue her involvement with field hockey
in the future.
Despite setting numerous personal
goals, Fox has no trouble focusing on
trying to lead her teammates to a Big
Ten Championship.

Senior Mary Fox Isn't worried by the field hockey team's lackluster start this season.
IRISH
Continued from page 8A
That set the stage for Powlus,
who, six plays after benefiting
from Michael Miller's 55-yard
kickoff return, found wideout Der-
rick Mayes in the back of the end-
zone for six points.
The game's outcome had to be
considered a surprise, given the
fact that Moeller was forced to play
without four of his top players.
Tailback Tyrone Wheatley,
receiver Walter Smith, linebacker
Matt Dyson and offensive line-
man Joe Marinaro all had to sit
and watch Michigan's last game
against Notre Dame until 1997.
Sophomore tailback Tshimanga
Biakabutuka rotated with starter
Ed Davis and racked up 100 yards
rushing, 23 yards receiving and
"The yards came a lot tougher
this week than they did last week,"
Biakabutuka said, referring to the
season opener against Boston Col-
lege. "Notre Dame's defense is a lot
tougher and they hit harder. I had
to fight hard for the extra yards"
Like last week, Michigan's
offense started slowly, gaining just
90 total yards - to Notre Dame's
183 - in the first half. But the
teams were tied 10-10 at the half.
In the third quarter, Michigan's
defensive front seven began to exert
solid pressure on Powlus, sacking
him six times for the game.
Irish tailback Lee Becton lost
two key fumbles, his first in 233
carries.
Last season Notre Dame fum-
bled more than one time in a game
only once, fumbling twice against
Michigan State. The three Irish
turnovers were key for Michigan.
The Wolverines lost the ball just
once, when Collins was sacked
by linebacker Jeremy Nau and
coughed it up late in the fourth she J urr
quarter. But Powlus flubbed the c.S S
snap two plays later (recovered by
Tony Henderson), setting up Ham-
ilton's third field goal of the day
and the game's astounding finish.
ROSENBERG
Continued from page 8A
kid's come from," special teams
coach Mike DeBord said. "He's
come from not being able to kick
an extra point or a field goal to
hitting them like he's hitting them
today."
He was ready to change schools, .
but instead changed his work hab-
its. He practiced and practiced all
summer. He became the best kick- This spr
er on the team. The coaches tried New Yor
Erik Lovell for a week, but when
that didn't work out, they had no
problem going to Hamilton. This ma
HARD WORK MAKES audio, v
HAMILTON HERO, you could also see
call this chapter. But then you and vies
would be leaving out the special broadb
bit of historical inspiration found
in most of your previous chapters. Hear Cs
When Remy Hamilton arrived
at college, he was given the num-
ber 19. That was the number worn on heat
by his team's last great kicker, her visit
Mike Gillette. Hamilton had never
met Gillette, but he knew all about
him.
Saturday morning, Mike Gil-
lette walked up to Remy Hamil- Looking for help
ton, articles on
"I met him today," Hamilton A

said. "He said, 'I don't know if you
know who I am. I'm Mike Gillette.
Just go out there and have a good
day.'"
Thus inspired by a hero from
the past, Hamilton kicked the win-
ning field goal.
"Kids always have their own
ways of trying to do things, and a
guy that's been there before can
sometimes speak their language
better than a coach," Moeller said.
"You can look at me and tell I
wasn't a placekicker."
I'm telling you, it's perfect.
Another chapter in the folklore.

e

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