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December 12, 2006 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

STAY
From page 1
along with Gov. Jennifer Granholm
and the trustees of any other public
educational institute in Michigan.
Because the University's lawsuit
is a response to the BAMN suit,
its legal bills will be covered by its
legal insurance plan.
Thestayrequest won'tgounchal-
lenged, though.
The Pacific Legal Foundation,
a Sacramento-based law firm that
opposes affirmative action, is likely
to file a response arguing against
granting the stay.
"I don't think it's justified in the
least," said Alan Foutz, an attorney
for the foundation.
"The universities that are mov-
ing for this stay in enforcement
have known about Proposal 2 for a
long time."

Foutz said the universities
have had plenty of time between
the passage of Proposal 2 and its
implementation to retrain staff and
change their admissions and finan-
cial aid policies to co..ply with the
amendment.
The Pacific Legal Foundation is
also combing through Michigan law
and government policies to deter-
mine if they contain any language
that violates Proposal 2, Foutz said.
If the foundation finds a provision
it suspects violates the amendment
that isn't repealed after Proposal 2
takes effect on Dec. 23, the founda-
tion plans to sue the state.
In the stay request, the univer-
sities argue not only that did they
not have enough time to change
their policies, but also that doing so
would be unfair to applicants.
University President Mary Sue
Coleman highlighted those con-

cerns in an interview yesterday.
"This will permit us to get
through our current cycle and be
fair to all of our applicants," she
said. "It's not easy for us just to flip
the switch and kind of change the
process, and we didn't think that
would be the right thing to do for
the number of young people apply-
ing to the University of Michi-
gan."
University Provost Teresa Sul-
livan laid out the complexities of
the University's admissions and
financial aid processes in an affi-
davit that accompanied the motion
for the stay. She said the Office of
Undergraduate Admissions expects
tohavereceived about20,000 appli-
cations by the time the amendment
is slated to take effect. The office
also told potential applicants about
the criteria for admissions begin-
ning in August.

"Students have relied on the
information they were given
months ago about this year's admis-
sions process," Coleman said in a
written statement
The stay request also argues
that the meaning of Proposal 2 is
unclear. On Nov. 9, Gov. Jennifer
Granholm issued an executive order
asking the Michigan Civil Rights
Commission to determine what
the amendment means and which
state laws and programs should be
repealed in order to comply with
it. The commission is expected to
issue a report in February.
University of Michigan General
Counsel Marvin Krislov said that's
one more reason the court should
grant the stay.
"There is a lot of uncertainty
over what the law implies," he said.
"We hope that will be lessened by
the governor's executive order."

ANALYSIS
From page 1
had nothing to do with preventing
a permanent ban on affirmative
action.
In public statements, Univer-
sity officials and their supporters
yesterday hammered home the
point that it would be unfair to
change the rules on admissions
and financial aid in the middle of
the cycle.
The message of the day was
clearly that a sudden change in
policy would be too disruptive, and
that the University would figure
out how to comply with Proposal
2 after this year's admissions and
financial aid cycle.
"Anyone who takes just 30 sec-
onds to consider the equity of this
is going to realize that the Univer-
sity is doing the only thingthat is
wise and fair," said Bruce Cortade,
a Republican lawyer who has often

argued publicly on behalf of affir-
mative action supporters.
That line of argument appeared
to resonate with some opponents
of affirmative action.
State Rep. Bill Caul, the vice
chair of the state House higher
education appropriations subcom-
mittee, said it would be inappropri-
ate for the University to bring a
lawsuit to fight Proposal 2, but that
asking for temporary relief might
be reasonable.
But Caul, a Mount Pleasant
Republican, warned that taking
too defiant a stand could hurt the
universities' pocketbooks. Because
the voters supported Proposal 2,
he said, being seen as fighting it
would risk alienating voters. And
since voters elect the legislators
who dole out state tax dollars, he
further argued, the schools should
take care to avoid that.
"They need to make the case
that they're working toward com-
plying with the law," he said.

Though anti-affirmative action
diehards have criticized the uni-
versities for failingto have new
policies ready to go, the main-
stream appears mostly untroubled.
The conservative Detroit News
issued an online staff editorial sup-
porting a delay only hours after the
request was announced.
A BALANCING ACT
Coleman's rhetoric yesterday
was also noticeably more moder-
ate than in the speech she gave on
the Diagthe day after Proposal 2
passed.
In that speech, Coleman called
California's 1996 ban on affir-
mative action a "horribly failed
experiment" that "we cannot, and
will not, allow to take seed" at the
University. She then said the Uni-
versity was considering every legal
option and questioned whether
Proposal 2 itself was lawful.
Voters, one might argue, could
be forgiven for coming away with

the impression that the president
intended to try overturning Pro-
posal 2.
Yesterday, though, Coleman
continued a more recent trend
of toning down her language. As
she has in recent weeks, Coleman
stressed that she was seeking to
find new ways to retain a diverse
student body without using race
and gender preferences.
Gone was the bluster about
overcoming the "handcuffs that
Proposal 2 attempts to place on
us." Coleman said yesterday that
the University would "obey the
law" and comply with the amend-
ment.
Although Coleman sounded
more conciliatory than ever
toward opponents of affirmative
action, she still seemed careful to
retain her credibility with liber-
als who support it. In a written
release, the president said the Uni-
versity would "recognize" - not
"respect" - the voters' decision.

MITCH'S
From page 1
Thompson drove to Lansing
yesterday afternoon and picked up
the license from the commission's
offices. The license allowed for the
delivery of beer, which Thompson
had already ordered. Thompson
said the beer arrived at the bar
around 4 p.m. yesterday.
By 8 p.m., the bar was filling
quickly with students who had
heard rumors about Mitch's re-
opening throughout the day, many
of whom had never enjoyed one of
the bar's famously cheap pitchers.
Most upperclassmen were not old
enough to enter the bar before it
closed two years ago.
LSA seniors Matt Curd and Will
Foss and Engineering senior Carl
Jones came to the bar and ordered
the night's special - a 60-ounce
pitcher of Miller High Life - imme-
diately after leaving class.
"Christmas came early this year,"
Curd said, pouring a glass of beer.
"We've heard everything about
this bar," Foss said as he fired up his
cell phone to spread the word about
the bar's opening. Meanwhile,
Jones selected Weezer's "Buddy
Holly" and Journey's "Don't Stop
Believin' " on the jukebox.
"It's so nice, such a change from
Rick's," Jones said, comparing the
space to the popular Church Street
bar.
Many people in the bar sounded
like children in a toy store.
Jones and his friends marveled at
everything from the 13 televisions
tuned into Monday Night Football
to the layout of the pool room and
its two billiards tables.
"I think this is going to move
up on the favorites," Jones said.
"It might overtake the Jug. Now
we have somewhere to go on Mon-
days."
They were soon joined by LSA
senior Amber Janis, who was just
as excited.
"I came straight from class," she
said. "I didn't even go home and
change my clothes. It'slike, 'Mitch's
is open, drop your books, let's get a
beer.'"
Janis pointed out another one of

Tuesday, December 12, 2006 - 7
the bar's perks: The staircase lead-
ing up to the doors is located inside
the building, which eliminates
waiting outside in long lines like at
most other bars.
"I'm so excited for Thursday,"
Janis said.
"I'm so excited for every night
this week," Foss replied.
By 11 p.m., nearly every table in
the bar was occupied and clinking
quarters bouncing off the tabletops
in a familiar drinking game could
be heard over the music coming
from the jukebox. While there was
no line to get in, a steady stream of
eager patrons continued to come up
the stairs and through the door.
Nursing junior Caroline Luke,
one of the waitresses, said business
had picked up at about 10:45 p.m.
She said she was hoping the bar
would see another uptick in cus-
tomers at about midnight.
"It's a lot of running around, but
it hasn't been too bad, pretty man-
ageable," she said of her first expe-
rience at Mitch's, which was also
her first shift as a cocktail waitress.
"Hopefully it will lead up to the
hype the old Mitch's had," she said.
Luke has had her job since July,
when she went into the new space
after hearing the bar would be re-
opening. She admitted she had
forgotten about it for much of the
semester until she received a call
from Thompson early last week.
He said the bar was opening that
Wednesday. When that didn't hap-
pen, she heard from Thompson over
the weekend. He told her yesterday
would be opening night.
Despite the patrons' excite-
ment on Monday night, Thompson
remains realistic about the level of
business the bar will see in the next
few weeks before students leave
campus for the holidays.
"I'm disappointed that we didn't
open earlier," Thompson said. "I
don't expect a lot in the next two
weeks."
But Jones, who began planning
his next order as soon as the pitcher
of Miller High Life arrived, was
still thrilled about his first night at
Mitch's.
"We will never have a night like
this again," he said.

Gore seeks Oscar, maybe presidency

NEW YORK - Al Gore is waging ing jokes on The Tonight Show With
a fierce campaign for recognition Jay Leno, offered ideas on preserv-
and an Oscar statuette for his glob-,. ing the environment to Oprah Win-
al warming documentary, while frey and her daytime audience and
reviving talk that he's pursuing a parried questions on Iraq from Matt
bigger prize: the presidency. Lauer on The Today Show.
His recent itinerary has been the On Saturday, Gore is hosting
ultimate in high profile. The former a network of 1,600 house parties
vice president made self-deprecat- across the country to watch and

discuss his documentary, An Incon-
venient Truth, with the Democrat
planning to address the gatherings
by satellite hookup. The movie is
on the short list of feature-length
documentaries being considered
for Oscar nominations.
Crisscrossing the country to pro-
mote the DVD version of the movie

Gore insists that he's not planning a
return to politics.
"I am not planning to run for
president again," Gore said last
week, arguing that his focus is rais-
ing public awareness about global
warming and its dire effects. Then
he added, "I haven't completely
ruled it out."

JOIN NEWS. E-MAIL US AT
NEWS@MICHIGANDAILY.COM

the michigan daily
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ARIES
(March 2110o April 19)
Don't be so hasty to be critical of oth-
ers today, especially co-workers. After
all, what goes around comes around:
Instead, think about how you can
improve your job.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
According to astrology texts, your
sign makes the best parent. That's
because you know three square meals a
day come first. Resist the tendency to be
critical of children today. (Forget how
far you walked to school as a kid.)
GEMINI
(May 21to June 20)
Avoid power struggles with family
members and partners today. You have a
deep urge to make improvements to
where you live. Don't lay this trip on
others. Just work according to your own
standards.
CANCER
(June 21to July 22)
Quite often, you worry too much.
Perhaps it's because you're a constant
nurturer. Avoid differences with others
today, especially siblings. You feel too
passionate about something.
LEO
(July 23to Aug. 22)
Take care of financial obligations
today. Pay your bills. Sort things out.
Resist the obsessive urge to buy some-
thing. Avoid money squabbles.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Today the Moon is in your sign. You
will definitely feel quite emotional about
something at some point. Specifically,
it's very easy to feel jealous. (Watch out
for that green-eyed monster.)
LIBRA
(Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
You might have a strong reaction to
somebody today simply because some-

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one might say something that triggers
fears, self-doubt and jealousies. Just let
this go. (No big deal.)
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23to Nov. 21)
A brief, heated conversation with a
friend might be anti-productive today. If
possible, don't even go there. It won't be
worth it.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22to Dec. 21)
Don't fly off the handle talking to
bosses or parents today. (You know you
have a mouth!) Most people cannot take
your blunt honesty, even though you
mean well.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22to Jan. 19)
You might be disappointed in travel
plans. You might also be suspicious
about someone who has a different back-
ground from yours. Actually, we are all
more unlike than not. Everyone wants to
be happy; no one wants to suffer.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
A passionate, heated reaction could
put you at odds with someone today. Ask
yourself if this is really worth it. Do you
want this?
PISCES
(Feb. 19to March 20)
Be extra-patient when talking to part-
ners, parents, bosses and friends today.
Even if you think you know best, they
don't want to hear it.
YOU BORN TODAY You're confi-
dent and self-possessed. Others enjoy
being in your company. You know how
to use your body language in an enter-
taining way. (You're a performer at
heart.) Many of you have a fine voice.
You're very convincing when you want
to be. The year ahead is fun-loving,
social and rewarding for relationships.
Birthdate of: Jennifer Connelly,
actress; Rajnikanth, Indian actor; Dionne
Warwick, singer

D 2006 King Features Syndicate, Inc

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