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April 03, 2006 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-04-03

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2A - The Michigan Daily - Monday, April 3, 2006

NATION/WORLD

Faithful celebrate
Pope John Paul

Thousands recall
legacy, suffering of pope
on first anniversary of
his death
VATICAN CITY (AP) - Pope John
Paul II was remembered on the first
anniversary of his death yesterday as an
advocate for the poor who helped fell
communism, with Catholics from Mex-
ico City to his native Poland praising his
legacy and calling for his beatification.
Pope Benedict XVI recalled his pre-
decessor's final days of suffering, before
an evening vigil that was expected to
draw at least 100,000 people to St.
Peter's Square.
"John Paul II died as he always lived,
animated by the indomitable courage of
faith, abandoning himself to God and
entrusting himself to holy Mary," Bene-
dict said in his weekly Sunday noontime
address.
Polish Roman Catholics filled
churches yesterday and voiced hopes
for a quick beatification of their beloved
native son.

In Krakow, thousands gathered with
candles and flowers at the Archbishop's
Palace to await the exact time of John
Paul's death - 9:37 p.m. - when Bene-
dict's prayers will be broadcast live.
The mood was solemn but more hope-
ftil than a year ago, when people fell to
their knees and wept openly at news of
John Paul's death.
"We were depressed then, but today
we rejoice in his sainthood even though
it has not been officially announced,"
said Krystyna Samborska, 32, a nurse
from Krakow.
Thousands of believers flocked to
John Paul's hometown of nearby Wado-
wice, where an open-air Mass in the
town at noon drew an estimated 8,000
people.
"We came to pray for his quick beati-
fication and also to pray to him to pro-
tect our family," said Wojciech Gladysz,
33, a gardener who traveled 220 miles
from Warsaw with his wife and three
children.
Tens of thousands of Roman Catho-
lics filled Mexico City's Basilica of the
Virgin of Guadalupe, the most impor-
tant Catholic shrine in the Americas.

AP PHOTO
The faithful hold candles in St. Peter's square at the Vatican yesterday
during a prayer vigil to commemorate the first anniversary of the death
of Pope John Paul 1I.
Poll. Most open to
immgratsstaying

NEWS IN BRIEF=:
TEHRAN, Iran
Iran tests high-speed underwater missile
Iran said yesterday it has successfully test fired a high-speed underwater missile
capable of destroying warships and submarines.
The Iranian-made missile has a speed of about 222 mph underwater, Gen. Ali
Fadavi, deputy head of the Navy of the elite Revolutionary Guards, said.
He called it the fastest underwater missile in the world - but it has the same
speed as the Russian-made VA- 11 Shkval, developed in 1995 and believed to be
the world's fastest.
It was not immediately known if the Iranian missile was based on the Shkval.
"It has a very powerful warhead designed to hit big submarines. No warwship
can escape from this missile," Fadavi told state-run television.
WASH INGTON
Tough choices ahead for new West Wing boss
President Bush's next chief of staff is the new broom in the White House
and his task is clear: Do some housecleaning or, at least, raise some dust.
With Bush's popularity at a low ebb, Joshua Bolten is expected to breathe
life into the president's stalled domestic agenda, warm relations with Capi-
tol Hill and put fresh faces in some jobs, according to former White House
chiefs of staff and Republicans with close ties to the Bush administration.
What is not clear is how much change Bolten will feel is needed to con-
vince a wary Congress and the public that the administration is turning a new
page. Those who have been in comparable positions under other Republican
presidents do not expect Bolten to orchestrate a major shake-up.
If Bush wanted an overhaul, he would have chosen someone other than
Bolten, who is much like Andy Card, his quiet-spoken predecessor. Bolten is
seen as reorganizing enough to re-energize the staff and give the perception
the changes are more than symbolic.
BAGHDAD
U.S., Britain: Now is time for Iraqi gov't
Frustrated by Iraq's failure to form a government, the chief U.S. and British diplo-
mats told squabbling leaders yesterday that it is time to pick a governing coalition.
"You can't continue to leave a political vacuum," Secretary of State Condoleezza
Rice said after talks with the prime minister, president and others.
Diverting from a trip to England, Rice joined British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw
on an unannounced visit intended to send the signal that international patience has worn
thin with the stalemate among Shiites, Sunnis and Kurds since December's elections.
"People have a sense of drift in the process, both in Iraq and outside of Iraq,"
Rice told reporters.
Since the U.S.-led invasion in March 2003, Washington and London have com-
mitted nearly all the billions of dollars spent in Iraq and suffered nearly all the
casualties. The U.S. and its allies hope a unified government will be able to curb
the violence and pave the way for foreign troops to begin heading home.
FARGO, N.D.
Rain-swollen Red River threatens to overflow
Volunteers filled and stacked sandbags Saturday to protect homes in North
Dakota and Minnesota from the rising Red River and its tributaries, swollen by.a
combination of melting snow and heavy rain.
Mayor Bruce Furness said Fargo was preparing for a flood crest next week of 37 to
38 feet, well above the official flood stage of 18 feet. However, he has said that would
threaten only about 30 homes - compared with about 130 flooded in 1997.
Along with the sandbagging, the mayor said Saturday there were signs the river's
rise is slowing.
"We're feeling better today than we did yesterday," Furness said.
On the Minnesota side of the Red River valley, the Buffalo River went over its
banks and the Rev. Brad Lewis had to use a canoe to get around his five-acre farm-
stead, about 15 miles south of Fargo near Sabin, Minn.
- Compiled from Daily wire reports
CORRECTIONS
Please report any error in the Daily to corrections@michigandaily.com.
420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com

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* Americans divided on
immigration issues like
border fence, offering
legal status
WASHINGTON (AP) - Ameri-
cans are divided about whether illegal
immigrants help or hurt the country, a
poll finds. More than one-half of those
questioned are open to allowing undoc-
umented workers to obtain some tempo-
rary legal status so they can stay in the
United States.
At the same time, people doubt that
erecting a fence along the U.S.-Mexico
border could help to fix such a complex
and enduring problem, an AP-Ipsos poll
found. Two-thirds do not think it would
work.
"You can't go and round up 11 mil-
lion people and ship them out of the
country." said Robert Kelly. The Chi-
cago lawyer is among the 56 percent
of Americans who favor offering some
kind of legal status. "It just isn't practi-
cal," he said.
A smaller but still significant share
- 41 percent - opposes offering any
kind of legal status, giving voice to a
law-and-order mind-set that bristles
at the notion of officially recognizing
those who did not play by the rules to
get here.
"Illegal is criminal," said Louella
Kelly, a 65-year-old grandmother from
Round Rock, Texas.
She said her 16-year-old granddaugh-
ter has had a hard time finding part-time
work because of all the jobs taken by
those who are illegally in the country.
"If we're going to give them amnesty,
then why don't we give amnesty to all
the people who break out of jail?"

Political analysts see an opening in
such poll results for President Bush,
who supports a temporary guest-worker
program.
The Republican Party is divided.
Business interests want to preserve their
access to foreign workers as a cheap labor
force, while many conservatives would
rather get tough on illegal immigrants.
The survey found 62 percent of Dem-
ocrats and 52 percent of Republicans
favored temporary worker status.
"If I were in the White House, I would
be pretty pleased about this," said Charles
Franklin, a University of Wisconsin polit-
ical science professor who studies public
opinion. "It does suggest pretty strongly
that the president has the opportunity to
drive public opinion on this."
Arizona State University professor
Bruce Merrill said immigration was the
first issue he had seen in 20 years that did
not clearly break along partisan lines.
"Conservative Democrats don't feel any
different from conservative Republi-
cans," he said, with both camps strongly
opposing the idea of rewarding people
who broke the law to enter the country.
The AP-Ipsos survey of 1,003 adults
was conducted Tuesday through Thurs-
day. Debate is swirling in Congress over
a proposal that would legalize many ille-
gal immigrants in the United States and
expand guest worker programs for an esti-
mated 400,000 immigrants each year.
Two-thirds of those surveyed think
illegal immigrants fill jobs that most
Americans do not want, the poll found.
But the survey found greater ambi-
guity on whether illegal immigrants
are good or bad for American society.
Fifty-one percent said illegal immi-
grants mostly make a contribution to
society and 42 percent said they were
mostly a drain.

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