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March 23, 2006 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-03-23

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2A - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 23, 2006

NATION/WORLD

NEWS IN BRIEF r#

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WASHINGTON
Court ruling limits police searches
The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that police cannot search a home when one
resident invites them in but another tells them to go away, provoking a strong objec-
tion from the new chief justice about the possible impact on battered women.
The 5-3 decision put new limits on officers who want to search for evidence of
a crime without obtaining a warrant first.
If one occupant tells them no, the search is unconstitutional, justices said.
Chief Justice John Roberts wrote his first dissent, predicting severe conse-
quences for women who want police to come in but are overruled by abusive
husbands.
The decision ended a trend of one-sided rulings by the court. About two-
thirds of the 30 rulings under the leadership of Roberts have been unani-
mous, a high number on a court that has in the past been polarized along
ideological lines.
The court's liberal members, joined by centrist Anthony M. Kennedy, said that
an officer responding to a domestic dispute call did not have the authority to enter
and search the home of a small-town Georgia lawyer in 2001 even though the
man's wife invited him in.

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AP PH1OO
U.S. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales
speaks with the media yesterday.
Guerla
charged

f &ALEXANDRIA, Va.
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andh
Colombian group used
$25 billion, earned from
international cocaine
sales, to fund war
WASHINGTON (AP) - The United
States charged 50 leaders of Colombia's
largest guerrilla group with sending
more than $25 billion worth of cocaine
around the world to finance their fight at
home, a federal indictment that depicts
the rebels as major narco-terrorists.
The indictment made public yester-
day in U.S. District Court said the lead-
ers of the Revolutionary Armed Forces
of Colombia, or FARC, ordered the
killings of Colombian farmers who did
not cooperate with the group, the kid-
napping and killing of U.S. citizens and
the downing of U.S. planes seeking to
fumigate coca crops.
U.S. officials said the indictment
strikes a blow against the group because
it lays out the FARC's hierarchy and
details of its operations. "Members of
the FARC do not want to face Ameri-
can justice," Attorney General Alberto
Gonzales said.
He acknowledged that 47 of those
charged remain at large, probably in
well-defended jungle strongholds that
have so far proved beyond the reach of
Colombian authorities.
The FARC supplies more than half
the world's cocaine and 60 percent of
the drug that enters the United States,
the indictment said. "The FARC's fin-
gerprint is on most of the cocaine sold
in America's neighborhoods," said the
head of the Drug Enforcement Admin-
istration, Karen Tandy.
Washington-based experts on Colom-
bia said the actual numbers probably are
lower, but are significant. Right-wing
paramilitary groups also are heav-
ily involved in the cocaine trade, the
experts and the indictment said.
The FARC uses proceeds from the
cocaine trade to purchase weapons in
its four-decade fight to overthrow the
Colombian government, the indictment
said. A grand jury returned the indict-
ment on March 1; it remained under seal
until yesterday.
The U.S. and the European Union
have designated the FARC a terrorist
organization.
Colombia President Alvaro Uribe,
Washington's closest ally in South
America, has waged an aggressive fight
against the FARC and stepped up efforts
to eradicate his country's coca crop.
Uribe faces re-election in May and has
been leading in the polls.
The U.S. has spent more than $3 bil-
lion since 2000 to reduce Colombia's
coca crop and the flow of cocaine to this
country. The results have been lacklus-
ter, said John Walsh, senior analyst at
the Washington Office on Latin Ameri-
ca, a think tank.
The indictment is intended to show
that U.S .-Colombian cooperation is
"successfully getting at the drug-traf-
ficking industry and attacking drug
financing," Walsh said.
Phillip McLean, a former American
diplomat who now is at the Center for
Strategic and International Studies, said
he expects the charges will influence the
debate in Colombia between those who
view the FARC as a traditional guerrilla
group with a political agenda and those
who see it as a criminal organization.

An aviation security officer testified yesterday that numerous measures could
have been instituted to thwart suicide hijackers had officials known in August 2001
that Zacarias Moussaoui was an al-Qaida member plotting to fly jetliners into U.S.
buildings.
Robert Cammaroto, who was in charge of issuing federal security directives to
airlines in 2001, said the Federal Aviation Administration could have moved its just-
under-three dozen armed federal air marshals from foreign to domestic flights, tight-
ened security checkpoints and directed flight crews to resist rather than cooperate
with hijackers. And he said most of these steps could have been ordered by FAA
within a matter of hours and remained in effect indefinitely.
In 2001, "we believed airplane bombings would not involve suicide," Cammaroto
told a U.S. District Court jury which must decide whether Moussaoui is executed or
imprisoned for life.
BAGHDAD
Iraqi forces foil insurgent attack, arrest 50
Emboldened a day after a successful jailbreak, insurgents laid siege to another
prison yesterday. This time, U.S. troops and a special Iraqi unit thwarted the pre-
dawn attack south of Baghdad, overwhelming the gunmen and capturing 50 of
them, police said.
Although the raid failed, the insurgents' ability to put together such large and
well-armed bands of fighters underlined concerns about the ability of Iraqi police
and military to take over the fight from U.S. troops. Sixty militants participated in
the assault, which attempted to free more jailed Sunni insurgents, police said.
The attack on the prison in Madain, 15 miles southeast of Baghdad, began with
insurgents firing 10 mortar rounds. They then stormed the facility, which is run by
the Interior Ministry, a predominantly Shiite organization and heavily infiltrated
by members of various Shiite militias.
WHEELING, W.Va.
Bush publicly defends his stance on Iraq
Whether he's before a friendly West Virginia audience, a Cleveland club
proud of its interrogation skills or a White House news conference, President
Bush is drawing on his plainspoken manner in freewheeling venues to defend
his Iraq strategy.
Alternately serious and joking, charming and disarming in this war anniver-
sary week, Bush is trying to counter election-year critics and reverse an approval
ratings slide.

CORRECTIONS

- Compiled from Daily wire reports

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