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March 15, 2006 - Image 7

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, March 15, 2006 - 7

WAGE
Continued from page 1
Washington-based nonprofit that has put
out a number of reports criticizing efforts to
raise the minimum wage, said increasing the
minimum wage leads to overall job loss.
That's partly because a higher wage
attracts teenagers from high-income fami-
lies into the labor market, displacing low-
skilled workers, according to the institute.
But House Minority Leader Dianne
Byrum said she didn't think jobs would be
lost, calling the job-killing claims a "fall-
back argument." She praised the increase.
"I don't think it sends a negative signal. I
think it sends a signal that Michigan values
hard work," the Onondaga Democrat said.
If the ballot measure passes, the bill
passed yesterday would be pre-empted by
that proposal, which proposes a $1.70 an
hour increase in January. Voters backing
the measure essentially would be approving
a 10-cent decrease in the minimum wage
after it rises by $1.80 in October.
But they also would be putting the
increase into the state constitution, where it
would be harder to change, and tying it to
inflationary increases.
A statewide poll of 600 likely voters by
released last week showed 74 percent sup-
ported raising the minimum wage to $7.15
an hour, while 24 percent opposed it and 2
percent were undecided. The poll was con-
ducted March 5-8 by Lansing-based EPIC/
MRA for WXYZ-TV and had a margin of
sampling error of plus or minus 4 percent-
age points.
Michigan's $5.15-per-hour minimum
wage is the same as the federal govern-
ment's. Seventeen states and the District of
Columbia have higher minimum wages.
Before voting, the House rejected an
amendment proposed by Republican Rep.
Bill Huizenga of Zeeland, who said workers
under age 18 should make $1 below the new
minimum wage. He also unsuccessfully
tried to change the bill to let colleges pay
student employees 85 percent of the mini-
mum wage.
Huizenga said his amendments would
have helped the working poor and addressed
the concerns of small business owners who
employ high school students.

GRANT
Continued from page 1
Of the 403 community college transfers
the University accepted this year, only 18
applied for financial aid. Administrators
said community college transfers may not
be aware of the financial aid options they
have.
"We will be trying to assure potential
community college transfers that resourc-
es are available to enable them to attend
the University," Margaret Rodriguez,
senior associate director of financial aid,
said in an e-mail interview. "There are
plans to meet with community college
presidents and their staff to discuss the
opportunities and resources available at
the University."
The number of low- to moderate-
income students enrolled at the Univer-
sity dropped drastically over the past
decade.
In 1995, 41.8 percent of students came
from families with incomes of $10,000 to
$74,999, but in 2005 that number dropped

to 28 percent. In that time, students from
families with incomes of greater than
$200,000 jumped from 12.5 to 20.7 per-
cent of those enrolled.
Straub, who worked for 10 years after
high school, was hesitant to apply to
college because of financial issues. But
Straub said his experiences at Washtenaw
Community College assured him that he
would be able to receive enough grants
and loans to get his degree.
Jirjis said some potential community
college transfers do not apply to the Uni-
versity because they feel intimidated by
the prospect of attending such a large
school.
Community college allowed Jirjis to
explore her interests and remain on a
sound financial footing. When it came
time to transfer to a university, she said
Michigan's size did not deter her from
applying.
"It's in my personality not to pass
things up," she said. "Even though uni-
versities are tougher than community col-
leges, I have a strong work ethic so I knew
it would be possible to survive there."

SYMPOSIUM
Continued from page 1
both structural and cyclical deficits. Cyclical
deficits are caused by a general economic down-
turn that causes the state's overall tax revenue to
decrease. Structural deficits are caused by cost
increases instituted to maintain current policies;
the increases are outpacing revenue growth.
The structural deficit is caused by an increas-
ing imbalance between the revenue and spend-
ing in Michigan's budget. The revenue figures
used to calculate the structural deficit include
sales tax and income tax revenue, but they have
dramatically decreased because of tax rate cuts.
The expenditure sources for the state budget are
centered on health care, which is growing fast-
er than previously expected. Health care is the
largest component in the state budget.
Clay also said the structural deficit is out
of control because of increasing spending on
correctional facilities. Michigan has the larg-
est state-operated incarceration program in the
United States; it employs nearly one-third of all
state workers. Frequent upswings in the incar-
ceration rate continually force spending to out-

pace revenue.
The conference also explored challenges fac-
ing Michigan's labor markets and future work-
force.
"An educated and skilled population is so
important for us because it dramatically increas-
es the productivity of the state and the econotnic
resources in it," Blank said.
One problem the state faces is low labor
force participation among less skilled workers
compared with other states - a figure that is
continuing to decline. Even though Michigan
is far above the national average in high school
graduation rates, it's below average in college
attendance. Blank said that far more students
are leaving the state to attend college than com-
ing into Michigan to go to school.
According to Blank, the state needs better
higher education resources in order to attract
students for college as well as increase college
attendance among lower-income Michigan resi-
dents. Another policy change discussed was the
need to attract new educated workers to the state
by bringing diverse industries and more vibrant
urban areas. Ultimately, lackluster worker
recruitment is linked with the state's budget cri-
sis and limited economic growth.

WALLACE
Continued from page 1.
show. Hewitt said Tuesday that Wallace will be remem-
bered with Edward R. Murrow and Walter Cronkite as
the three legends of CBS News.
Hewitt said he appreciated Wallace's well-rounded
ability to tell different stories, from Putin to Carol Bur-
nett, from Tina Turner to Vladimir Horowitz. It was
more than the caricature of a reporter chasing a reluctant
subject down a dark street.
"It was showbiz baloney," Hewitt said. "We did it for
a long time. Finally, I said, 'Hey, kid, maybe it's time to
retire that trenchcoat."
Wallace interviewed hundreds of newsmakers, includ-
ing Deng Xiaoping, Ayatollah Khomeini, Yasir Arafat,
King Hussein and Presidents Johnson, Nixon and Rea-
gan. He interviewed John Nash, the academician who
was the subject of the movie "A Beautiful Mind," and
arranged for Louis Farrakhan and the eldest daughter of
Malcolm X to be interviewed together.
In 1998, Wallace aired a report which on videotape
showed Dr. Jack Kevorkian injecting lethal drugs into a
terminally ill man.
Some of his news subjects fought back. Retired
Gen. William C. Westmoreland sued CBS for a Wal-

lace report on the Vietnam War. Although the case was
dropped after a long trial, Wallace said the case brought
on a depression that put him in the hospital for more than
a week.
Wallace also aired a report with tobacco company
whistleblower Jeffrey Wigand in 1995 that became the
subject of the movie "The Insider," alleging CBS News
caved to pressure from lawyers in delaying the report.
Wallace's television career dates back to the late
1940s. He acquired his reputation as a tough interroga-
tor with "Night Beat," a local news show in New York
that was a series of one-on-one interviews.
But he was also a game-show host and a commercial
pitchman for cigarettes. He became a full-time newsman
for CBS in 1963, saying the death of his 19-year-old son,
Peter, in an accident made him decide to stick with seri-
ous journalism.
Late last year, Wallace, to promote his memoir, sat for
an interview with his son, Chris Wallace, a Fox News
Channel anchor. The son asked his father, "Do you hate
getting old?"
"I had my hearing aid fixed today so that I could prop-
erly hear you," the elder Wallace responded. "I can't see
as well. I now have - this has stopped me from smoking
- a pacemaker, have for about the last 15 years. No, I
don't like getting old."

MSA
Continued from page 1
Golden admitted he had taken
down the flyer, but said he had
been given permission to take
it down by the resident upon
whose door it had originally been
placed. .
At the hearing, he produced an
e-mail from the resident confirm-
ing his story.
"Since I had permission to take
down the flyer, this whole affair
is pretty absurd," Golden said in
an interview.
MPP members said there were
discrepancies between the MSA
election code and the code gov-
erning LSA-SG elections. In
LSA-SG's code, candidates may
remove campaign material as
long as they have permission. But
in MSA's code, any removal or
"moving" of another candidate's
campaign material is a violation

of the code.
"The election director never
informed LSA-SG candidates or
party leadership that they were
responsible for both codes," said
MPP party chair Jon Koller. '
Li's status as an MSA candi-
date, however, caused the issue to
fall under the MSA election code,
even though Golden is running for
an LSA-SG position.
"Ignorance is not a legitimate
cause to violate election code,"
said S4M Communications Direc-
tor Peter Borock, who acted as
Li's counsel in the hearing.
In his complaint to the board,
Li brought similar charges against
two MPP members, MSA repre-
sentative candidates Art Reyes
and Arvind Sohoni. The charge
against Reyes was passed over
at the hearing. Li withdrew the
charge against Sohoni at the end
of a preliminary hearing Monday
night.

the michigan daily

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NEED HOUSING FOR FALL 2006?
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Stop by our office for a complete brochure!
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OFFICE SPACE AVAIL. at 410 E. William,
2 waiting rms., 2 baths., all utils. included,
weekly cleaning services. Call 734-663-8989
or oldtownrealty@ameritech.net
RIVER'S EDGE APARTMENTS! Half off
1st. mo. ! Why pay the high A2 prices? Ypsi-
lanti is only 15 min. drive to campus. teas-
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Heat & Water. 487-5750. Virtual tours and
apply online at www.riversedge.org
ROOMS FOR RENT avail. immed. Campus
Sarea From $350/mo. 769-2344 or
hutch@provide.net
TUSCAN CREEK APTS. - 1 bdrms., $570.
2 bdrms., $595. Small dogs welcome.
734-484-0516.
CORNERHOUSE
APARTMENTS
205 S. State St.
on central campus
2 & 3 bdrm Apt Homes
Beautifully Furnished

Fl P/T OR F/i nanny needed during weekdays
for 5 mo. old. Milan/Saline area 439-3509.

!!!BARTENDER WANTED!!! $300 a day
potential, Age 18+ ok. No experience neces-
sary, training provided. 800-965-6520 x 125.
$7550 PAID DAILY. Petition cirulators.
No exp., no sales. 734-931-1126.
$9.00/HR. MICHIGAN TELEFUND is now
hiring. Awesome Resume Builder! Apply on-
line: www.telefund.umich.edu or 763-4400.
AWESOME SUMMER JOB! CAMP
WAYNE FOR GIRLS --Childrens' sleep-
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a caring, fun environment we need Coun-
selors and Program Directors for: Tennis,
Swimming (W.S.I. preferred), Golf, Gymnas-
tics, Cheerleading, Drama, High & Low
Ropes, Team Sports, Water skiing, Sailing,
Painting/Drawing, Ceramics, Silk screen,
Printmaking, Batik, Jewelry, Calligraphy,
Photography, Sculpture, Guitar, Aerobics,
Self-Defense, Video, Piano. Other staff: Ad-
ministrative, CDL Driver (21+), Nurses
(RN's and Nursing Students), Bookkeeper,.
Mothers' Helper. On campus Interviews
March 23rd. Select The Camp That Selects
The Best Staff! Call 1-800-279-3019 or ap-
ply on-line atwww.campwaynegirls.com
BEVERAGE CART SERVERS, Bartenders,
Grill Servers, and Banquet workers wanted at
Stonebridge Golf Club in A2. PT and FT call
Doug 734-323-8782.
BICYCLE MECHANIC WANTED: FT/PT,
exp. nec. Bring resume to: Two Wheel
Tango, 3162 Packard, Ann Arbor, MI.
CILCAGOLAND'S RAMAH DAY camp is
looking for Jewish counselors. Contact Lori
at ramahdaydir@sbcglobal.net
EARN $4,000! Be an Egg Donor. Must be
20-29 years of age and a non-smoker. Please
call Alternative Reproductive Resources at
248-723-9979 or visit www.arrl.com to learn
more.
GOLF SHOP SALES Associates & Cashiers
needed. Call 734-973-9004.
GROUNDS CREW/MAINTENANCE EM-
PLOYEES wanted for Stonebridge Golf
Club in A2. Part time and Full time positions
available. Call Kris @ 734-645-7714.
INDIVIDUALS NEEDED FOR RE-
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ages 18 to 55, for participation in upcoming
drug research studies. Study participation re-
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must not take daily prescription medications
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pre-screening process is required. For more
information, call the Research Recruiters at
1-800-567-8804. Pfizer Research Clinic 2800
Plvmouth Rd. Ann Arbor M 481OS

PRO SHOP WORKERS wanted at Stone-
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available. Knowledge of golf preferred. call
Doug 734-323-8782.
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RESPONSIBLE, EXPERIENCED, FUN-
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car and references. Call Kim at 668-6882.

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Granger. $680/mo. Call 734-327-0529.
SUBLET: 2 BDRM. @ 910 Packard and 3
bdrm. @ 1600 Packard. 222-9033. JMS.
WALKING DISTANCE TO campus. May-
Sept. 1 Bdrm. Price neg. Call 858-699-5576.

HIGH PAID INTERIOR PAINTING JOB:
Flex. hrs., no prior exp. req., upward mobil-
ity, work w/ friends, 734-255-8911/GbSU.
GOLF COURSE POSITIONS
The University of Michigan's Radrick Farms
Golf Course is seeking motivated and
conscientious people to fill grounds crew and
clubhouse positions for the summer and be-
yond. Positions available starting April 1st.
Contact Paul L. Scott at plscott@umich.edu
EOAAE.
SUMMER COUNSELORS WANTED
Counselors needed for our student travel and
pre-college enrichment programs, middle
school enrichment, and college admissions

For Thursday, March 16, 2006
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
You'll have to go more than halfway
when dealing with others today. That's
because the Moon is directly opposite
your sign. Just decide to cooperate.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
This is a good day to tidy up loose
ends at work. Someone might seek you
out for a quiet, confidential conversa-
tion. Be sincere and sympathetic.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
This is a fun-loving, flirtatious day.
You feel a bit prankish. Enjoy yourself.
Take a long lunch. Play hooky if you
can. It's a play day!
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
Focus on home, family and real estate
matters today. Discussions with a parent
could be significant. Listen carefully to
family members.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
This is the day for busy little errands,
short trips and taking care of tasks
you've put off. Clean up what's on your
plate. Multitask whenever you can.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Make friends with your bank account
today. This is a good day to stay on top
of your finances, pay bills and reduce
your loans. It's also a good day to shop.

SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
You need some peace and quiet today.
Work alone if you can, or work behind
the scenes. Don't push yourself. This is a
good day to rest or take a nap.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Conversations with a female friend
will be significant today. Be open to any-
one who approaches you. Someone
wants to talk to you. (Or maybe you
want to talk to someone!)
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
You'll briefly be in the limelight
today. Bosses and VIPs notice you now.
Make sure you make a good impression.
(Make hay while the sun shines.)
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
Don't worry if you feel restless today.
You want adventure! You want some-
thing different to happen. Go someplace
you've never been before in order to sat-
isfy this urge.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
You might want to examine your part-
ner's earnings or how somebody else is
handling shared property or anything
you have an interest in. Make sure you
know what's going on.
YOU BORN TODAY
You're very clever! You are both
highly imaginative and practical. You
feel good inside your skin. This self-

.:

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