100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 14, 2006 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2006-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 7

AID
Continued from page 1
date, said he is vehemently opposed to assessing
a contribution from noncustodial parents because
he thinks it will discourage students from attend-
ing the University.
"We should be encouraging students of single
parents to succeed," said Baker, who comes from
a single parent.
MSA Rep. Mat Brener said the policy presents
difficulties lower-income students.
"This is putting an overwhelming burden on the
student from a single-parent, low-income house-
hold," he said.
Lester Monts, senior vice provost for academic
affairs, contended that because the University does
not currently use the new form, it is not able to
offer aid awards that are as fair as at other schools.
Some strong students have chosen to attend the
more than 200 schools that already use the form,
he said.
"If Michigan is going to compete with other col-
PROVOST
Continued from page 1
Michigan Civil Rights Initiative.
Sullivan cited two reasons why she thinks diversity
in higher education would suffer if Michigan voters ban
affirmative action programs in November.
First, some minority students might stop applying.
Second, those minorities who receive offers of admis-
sion might refuse to enroll for fear that they might
encounter a hostile environment.
The administration will obey whatever the law is, but
"we want a diverse student body," she said.
Sullivan also said she doesn't think the 10-percent
rule - the Texas law that grants admission to any pub-
lic universities for high school students who are in the
top 10 percent of their class - would work in Michigan
because the two states are geographically and demo-
graphically dissimilar.

leges on several levels, don't you think we would
want to compete in terms of our ability to provide
financial aid to our students?" Monts said.
Monts maintains that the University wants to
assist students who may be hurt by the policy.
"Any student who falls through the cracks - we
hop to the task to help that student," he said.
Nicole Stallings, who is running for MSA presi-
dent with the Students 4 Michigan party, also said
the problem with the policy lies with students who
are put in a catch-22 because their noncustodial
parents will be assessed a contribution but may be
unwilling to pay it.
If Stallings were an incoming freshman, she
would have been affected by the change in policy.
Her parents divorced when she was 5. While she
occasionally contacts her father, he does not con-
tribute to her education.
She describes his financial support as "hit-and-miss."
"It's not something I can count on, and not
something I want my education to ride on," Stall-
ings said.
But according to federal policy, parental unwill-
ingness to contribute to a child's education is not

considered a valid reason to reduce an expected
family contribution.
Fowler said that since this is true for two-parent
families, noncustodial parents must be treated the
same way.
"If their parent is alive,and well and working
every day, (the student) will have to find some
other means to find what they need to stay here,"
Fowler said.
Administrators maintain that the form will also
allow financial aid officers to treat students more
equally by asking specific questions so that parts
of a family's income are not overlooked.
Fowler said that the FAFSA - previously the
only form used by the financial aid office - has
been streamlined over the past five years in order
to make it more accessible to parents with less
education.
But as it has become simpler, she said, it has
also provided problems for students whose finan-
cial situations are not accurately represented by
their family's adjusted gross income.
"We want to treat everyone the same, and the
FAFSA just doesn't do that," Fowler said.

AP CREDIT
Continued from page 1
Biology Prof. Bob Bender said
he is confident that AP scores are
an accurate measure of a student's
understanding of first-year con-
cepts.
Data collected by his depart-
ment indicate that students with
AP credit do slightly better in
second-year courses than students
who took the course at the Univer-
sity, he said.
Chemistry Prof. Brian Coppola
also said similar research indicates
students scoring a three or above
on the AP chemistry exam were,
adequately prepared for second-
year courses at the University.
Coppola said his department
tends to be generous with credit so
that students can move into more
specialized courses like organic
chemistry.
LSA Junior Jacki Fisher, who
took both the chemistry and biol-
ogy AP exams, said because of the
strength of her high school pro-
gram she was prepared for second-
year course work.
However, Fisher said other fac-
tors, such as the structure of a
college class, the way material is
presented and intensive lab work,
can't always be simulated by an
AP course.
Bender said that for concentra-
tors, multiple lab requirements
quickly cover any gaps in higher
intensity lab work left by the AP.
Jayne Brownell, director of the
LSA advising center, said high AP
scores can give students a "false
sense of security."

Because of an annual review
roughly two years ago, the phys-
ics department decided to begin
only accepting AP scores of five to
assure students had covered foun-
dational material in-depth, said
Physics Prof. Tim McKay said.
McKay, who serves as an advis-
er in the department, also said he
often recommends that students
who score a four or lower on the
exam to take the first-year course
as review or take it at the honors
level if they do not find it chal-
lenging enough.
"There are worse things in the
world than getting an 'A' in a dii-
ficult science course," McKay
said.
To solve the translation probA
lem between AP and Univer-
sity courses, instead of offering
equivalency for a particular
course, some departments like
English and history grant general
department credits, which can be
used toward graduation but do
not place a student out of a par-
ticular course.
The math department's policy
for LSA students rewards students
who take both a version of the AP
Calculus exam and Math 115 or
116 by giving additional retroac-
tive credit for the AP score when
the student passes the University
course,
Sally Lindsley, senior associate
director of admissions, said the
University is regularly among the
schools with the most AP credit
accepted because of the strength
of its applicant pool.
In the number of scores submit-
ted, the University ranked eighth
nationwide in 2004-05.

ARMENIA
Continued from page 1
sidered the architect of Armenia's
transition to a market economy
after the fall of the Soviet Union
in 1991.
His lecture, titled "Adapting to
New Economic Values: Armenia
in Transition," focused on prog-
ress and evolution in Armenia.
He also spoke about the prob-
lems that arose after the first wave
of reforms in the post-Soviet era,
such as the difficulties stemming
from privatizing businesses and
industry after years of heavy state
control over the economy.
Bagratyan explained some of

those issues using amusing, yet
informative analogies.
"An empire should be like a cake
that's on the table until everyone
has a piece," he said. "Once all the
cake is gone, it should be over."
He likened Armenia to a car
that can only move forward if all
the pieces are working properly.
Since resigning as prime min-
ister, Bagratyan has held 4 variety
of positions, but he is currently
the vice president of an Armenia-
based brandy company, one of the
oldest companies in Armenia.
"He has first-hand experience
in changing a part of the 20th cen-
tury, and he will go down in his-
tory," said History Prof. Gerard
Libaridian.

Libaridian, who organized the
lecture, said he expected a large
and diverse crowd of students to
attend the event.
Attendee Christine Harper, a
graduate student in the School of
Public Health, said she came to
learn about how the country has
recovered since the collapse of the
Soviet system.
Harper said her brother will
be serving in the Peace Corps in
Armenia in June.
Another student who attended
the event because of his interest in
the recovery of Armenia was RC
sophomore Aram Sarkisian, who
said he came to get Bagratyan's
perspective on important govern-
mental issues facing Armenia.

the michigan daily

NORTH CAMPUS 1 & 2 bdrm. apts. avail.
immed., May & August! Dogs welcome!
FREE winter shuttle around Central & North
campus. MODELS OPEN DAILY! 741-9300.'
OFFICE SPACE AVAIL, at 410 E. William,
2 waiting rms., 2 baths., all utils. included,
weekly cleaning services. Call 734-663-8989
or oldtownrealty@ameritech.net
RIVER'S EDGE APARTMENTS! Half off
1st. mo. ! Why pay the high A2 prices? Ypsi-
lanti is only 15 min. drive to campus. Leas-
ing now! 1, 2, & 3 bdrms. From $595. Free
Heat & Water. 487-5750. Virtual tours and
apply online at www.riversedge.org
ROOMS FOR RENT avail. immed. Campus
area. From $350/mo. 769-2344 or
hutch@provide.net

!!! FREE SPRING/SUMMER sublet
finder!!! 22 premier Ann Arbor locations to
choose from with studios-6 bedrooms. Call
741-9300 for your complete list.

AVAILABLE NOW & MAY!!
Campus 2 and 3 bedroom apartments
Fumished and reasonably priced
Call 734.668.1100 or stop
in at 625 Church St.

TREE CITY PROPERTIES
Available Fall 2006

5 Bdrm: 407 Hamilton
3 Bdmn: 1219 Packard
2 Bdrm: 506 S. Fifth ave
6 Bdrm: 340 S. Division
2 Bdrm: 915 Greenwood

$2500
$1650
$1200
$3000
$1100

MAY-AUG. - 3 BDRM. APT. 1004 Vaughn
w/ prkg! $1,200/mo. Jrocca@umich.edu
SP/SU 1115 WILLARD - CRAWFORD
HOUSE. 6 Bdrm., 2 full baths, hg. ktch., cen-
tral air, irg. common rm. fully furnished. Call
Today!Brittany (786) 586-2083.
SUBLET FOR RENT. 1 bdrm. 1303
Granger. $680/mo. Call 734-327-0529.
SUBLET: 2 BDRM. @ 910 Packard and 3
bdrm. @ 1600 Packard. 222-9033. JMS.
WALKING DISTANCE TO campus. May-
Sept. 1 Bdrm. Price neg. Call 858-699-5576.

EARN $4,000! Be an Egg Donor. Must be
20-29 years of age and a non-smoker. Please
call Alternative Reproductive Resources at
248-723-9979 or visit www.arrl.com to learn
more.
GROUNDS CREW/MAINTENANCE EM-
PLOYEES wanted for Stonebridge Golf
Club in A2. Part time and Full time positions
available. Call Kris @ 734-645-7714.
INDIVIDUALS NEEDED FOR RE-
SEARCH STUDIES: The Pfizer Reserach
Clinic in Ann Arbor is seeking healthy men
ages 18 to 55, for participation in upcoming
drug research studies. Study participation re-
quires a stay of 10 to 20 days in the Research
Clinic. Individuals will be paid for participat-
ing in study activity. Payment for study par-
ticipation ranges from $1800-$2500. You
must not take daily prescription medications
or have any chronic illness. You must be a
non-smoker or light-smoker to be eligible. A
pre-screening process is required. For more
information, call the Research Recruiters at
1-800-567-8804. Pfizer Research Clinic 2800
Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48105.
MARKETING OPPORTUNITY
GET PAID DAILY
THURS. 3/16 @ 7PM UM HENDERSON
RM. 3RD FLOOR IN THE UNION
REGISTER @ 800-261-6755.
OVER 300 COMPANIES pay up to $75/sur-
vey, www.getpaidtothink.com
PART-TIME RECEPTION WORK in real
estate office. Sat. & Sun. + 2 weekdays. Call
761-9666 on weekdays.
SWIMMING POOL SERVICE and
construction. Fast paced outdoor work,
weekends off. Top pay for hard working, self-
motivated people to work in the NW
DETROIT SUBURBS. 248-477-7727.
WOLVERINESNEEDJOBS.COM
We need Paid survery takers in Ann Arbor.
100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys.

GOLF COURSE POSITIONS
The University of Michigan's Radrick Farms
Golf Course is seeking motivated and
conscientious people to fill grounds crew and
clubhouse positions for the summer and be-
yond. Positions available starting April 1st.
Contact Paul L. Scott at plscott@umich.edu
EOAAE.
WORK ON MACKINAC Island this Season-
The Island House Hotel and Ryba's Fudge
Shops are looking for seasonal help in all ar-
eas: Front Desk, Bellstaff, Waitstaff, and
Sales Clerks. Housing available, bonus, and
discounted meals. Call Ryan at
1(800)626-6304 www.theislandhouse.com
BABYSI ITER P/T FOR 4 and 6 year old in
Ann Arbor home. Non smkr. Contact Allie.
1-586-3545738.

ROOMMATE/AIDE WANTED
I'm a mildly developmentally disabled 19
year old male in need of a male, graduate stiu
dent roommate to help me keep-organized
and live independently. Rent and/or comper;-
sation provided for your aid. Starting May
2006 and/or Sept. 2006. Call Keith 645-8609.

Let us find

!!! FREE ROOMATE FINDER
your perfect match. Call 741-9300.

- on +" "ito t i~iafmo
-U.
P/T OR F/f nanny needed during weekdays
for 5 mo. old. Milan/Saline area 439-3509.

LARGE FURNISHED 3 bdrm. apt on S.
State, Near UM bus stop, 5 min. to Mich.
Union. Avail. Now, winter, Fall '06. Heat &
water incl. Balc., A/C, prkg., ldry. $1400
-$1550. No smkg./no pets. 734-996-3539 or
734-678-7250. ehtseng@comcast.net
LARGE ROOMS IN REMODELED
HOUSE. Also, 2 room suites. Now to fall.
New fum., deluxe kitch., ldry., great prkg. 6
min. walk to main campus. 973-7368.
LEASING FOR FALL '06. Efficiencies, 1
bdrm., 2 bdmn., 618 & 624 Packard, 820 Ann
& S. Main, & 537 Division. 734-260-3619.
LOOKING FOR 2006-2007 housing. We
have many eff., 1 and 2 bdrm. apts. avail.
near campus. Rent range from $625-$1250.
Most incl. heat and water. Parking avail. for
small fee for most. Call today 734-996-1991
or visit www.cappomanagement.com
LOW SEC. DEP., $1,200 OFF W/ 1 YR.
LSE.! Great North Campus loc. Lg. apts.
Heat incl. & pets O.K. Beautiful, landscaped
grounds, lg. walk-in closets. 734-663-8463.
NEAR UNION: CONTEMP. studios to 3
bdrm, apts. 741-9300.annarborapartments.net
NEED HOUSING FOR FALL 2006?
Fantastic Apartments, Great Houses.
Convenient Central Campus locations.
Stop by our office for a complete brochure!
Campus Rentals
734-665-8825
www.campusrealty.com
PRIVATE/SHARED RMS. AVAIL. now
and fall/winter. $203419/mo. + food/utils.
ICC Stud. Co-ops, 662.4414 www.icc.coop

Check website for more houses & apartments!
www.treecityproperties.com
734-994-8733.
CORNERHOUSE
APARTMENTS
205 S. State St.
on central campus
2 & 3 bdrm Apt Homes
Beautifully Furnished
Outstanding views
Garage parking
Central air
9 foot high ceilings
Premier campus location
NOW SIGNING
LEASES FOR FALL
Models open daily1
734-741-9300
www.annarborapartments.net
TUSCAN CREEK APTS. - 1 bdrms., $570.
2 bdrms., $595. Small dogs welcome.
734484-0516.
WALK TO MAIN Campus,licensed for 5,
315 John St, $2100/month, 12 month lease
beginning in Aug. Call Jim David at
248-437-3300.
WALK TO NORTH Campus. I & 2 bdrm.
apts. Free heat & H20. May & Aug. leases
avail. www.collegeparkweb.com 769-1313.
WILSON WHITE COMAPNY
LEASING FOR
Spring/Fall 2006

MONDAY SPECIAL
$4 Chipattis
TUESDAY SPECIAL
A-

f

$4 Quesadillas

****** HALL RENTAL ******
artspace101.com
CAMPUS CLEANERS: PROF. iry Clean-
ing & Ldry. Free summer storage. 1305 S.
University next to Campus Rental. 662-1906.
EDITING. PRE-PRESS FORMATING for
books, theses, journal articles. 996-0566 or
writeon@iservnet
!!!BARTENDER WANTED!!! $300 a day
potential, Age 18+ ok. No experience neces-
sary, training provided. 800-965-6520 x 125.
$75-150 PAID DAILY. Petition circulators.
No exp., no sales. 734-931-1126.
$9.00/HR. MICHIGAN TELEFUND is now
hiring. Awesome Resume Builder! Apply on-
line: www.telefund.umich.edu or 763-4400.
AWESOME SUMMER JOB! CAMP
WAYNE FOR GIRLS --Childrens' sleep-
away camp, Northeast Pennsylvania
(6/17-8/13/06). If you love children and want
a caring, fun environment we need Coun-
selors and Program Directors for: Tennis,
Swimming (WS.I. preferred), Golf, Gymnas-
tics, Cheerleading, Drama, High & Low
Ropes,CTeam Sports, Water skiing, Sailing,
Painting/Drawing, Ceramics, Silk screen,
Printmaking, Batik, Jewelry, Calligraphy,
Photography, Sculpture, Guitar, Aerobics,
Self-Defense, Video, Piano. Other staff: Ad-
ministrative, CDL Driver (21+), Nurses
(RN's and Nursing Students), Bookkeeper,
Mothers' Helper. On campus Interviews
March 23rd. Select The Camp That Selects

www.GOOD-TIME-CHARLEYS.com

1140 SOUTH UNIVERSITY AT CHURCH 734-668-8411 ,M -M. .

The Michigan Daily
Presents:

Classifieds

/ FH4NUMMEI 7
EMPLOYMENT SPECIAL
vSE CTION
Looking for a job this summer??
Whether you're staying in
Ann Arbor or looking for a job
abroad, check our the brand new,
Summer Employment Special Section on
THURSDAY, MARCH 16.
The section will feature positions from
both local and national companies...
if you need work this summer, look no
further!

For Wednesday, March 15, 2006
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
Don't give away the farm today.
You're tempted to be very generous
because you're sympathetic, but you
might not have the full picture about
something! Be careful.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
You will work very hard today to con-
vince others that your good ideas are
trustworthy. Expect some resistance.
People want to make sure you know
what you're talking about.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
You have excellent ideas about how to
make improvements at work today. Just
be sure they are realistic and not wishful
thinking. Check all your facts.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
You feel quite jubilant and optimistic
about something! No doubt you have
good reason. Nevertheless, make sure
you're not going out on a limb. (Self-
deception is possible today.)
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
You like to think the best of your
friends. It's just who you are. Be careful
that you don't overidealize someone
today. (Everybody puts his or her pants
on one leg at a time, just like you do.)

dent about something. Use caution.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
Expect others to scrutinize or look for
faults in what you have to say today.
They think what you're proposing is too
good to be true. (Hmmm - is it?)
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec: 21)
You're full of wonderful, imaginative
ideas today! Your ability to illustrate
your point is quite amazing.' You can
really visualize what you want.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
In large measure, this is a wonderful
day to do business. Nevertheless, there's
an element of self-deception present.
Make sure you have all your facts. ,
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
Because you're born 50 years ahead of
your time, others often don't understand
you. You might have to work to get oth-
ers to appreciate your suggestions today.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
This is the day to practice generosity
to others and show your kind, sympa-
thetic side. Nevertheless, remember that
true generosity is giving what is needed.
(Don't be naive.)
YOU BORN TODAY
You're a natural leader, with charisma
and magnetism! You're also ambitious to

A
p
MADISON pPRTY COMPANY f
A
v

-93

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan