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January 10, 2006 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-01-10

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 10, 2006 - 7

Move upsets former YMCA patrons

YMCA
Continued from page 1
about $1,200 per month per
resident to about $320 per
month per resident.
In response to residents'
concerns, council member
Stephen Rapundalo (D-
Ward 2) said the apartments
were on a bus route and that
the residents would have
medical services available
at their apartment complex.
Although she voted in
favor of the measure, Coun-
cil member Jean Carlberg
(D-Ward 3) expressed regret
that the city was moving the
residents out of Ann Arbor.
"We are committed to
bringing everyone back into
this community once the
facility is built," she said.
The city has commit-
ted itself to keeping 100
low-income housing units
formerly available at the
YMCA as part of the site's
redevelopment.

TOMMASO
GOMEZ/Daily
After the
YMCA was
shut down,
patrons
Gilbert Sam
and Philip
Brzezinski
speak at an
Ann Arbor
City Council
meeting yes-
terday.

ASSAULIT
Continued from page 1
off and participants in the scuffle
were subsequently thrown out, said
Ben Streeter, a night manager at the
restaurant.
The victim was not involved in
the altercation, Anderson said.
Instead, he waited to receive his
food while his friend and an assail-
ant went outside to fight.
"I didn't want any part of it," the
victim said.
On his way home shortly after-
word, the victim witnessed the
two men fighting and broke up the
fight.
"The last thing I remember is
looking at the face of the suspect,"
he said. "I must have been knocked
out instantly."
Police believe the victim was
struck from behind by one of the
four individuals after breaking up
the fight after the victim's friend
had left the scene.
"He meant well and was trying to
be the peacemaker," Anderson said.
"It sounds like someone sucker-
punched him."
Because of the coma, the junior
missed two exams and has been
unable to attend his classes 'this
semester.
"I have to take it step-by-step," he
said. "Recovery will be a long pro-
cess."
He suffered a cerebral hemor-
rhage, skull fracture and sinus frac-
ture and required stitches in his
chin and lip. He also lost hearing in
one ear.

U t
COURTESY OF AAPD
Police prepared this composite
sketch of the alleged perpetrator.
He is a white man, 6'2", about 220
pounds with dirty blond hair and
blue eyes.
"The doctors don't expect me to
get it back," he said.
The junior has attempted to return
to class, but couldn't because of a
lack of balance and other factors
such as dizzy spells.
The victim's mother said he is
lucky to be alive.
"It was animalistic to attack my
son like this," she said. "He didn't
even see them coming. If you were
at that restaurant that night, I hope
you realize they tried to kill some-
one. I hope you don't want these
people going to school with you,
because I don't want them going to .
school with my son."
Anyone with information regard-
ing the incident can call Anderson
at 996-3249 or the AAPD's anony-
mous police tip line at 996-3199.
"I wouldn't change anything I did
in the situation," tte victim said.

SA L R ary increases.
"The University is aware that in
Continued from page 1 tough budget times it's easy to lose
good faculty," University spokeswom-
have made boosting faculty salaries a top an Kelly Cunningham said. "We rec-
priority. ognize that a lot of universities would
According to the AAUP, last year like to have (our faculty)."
the University exceeded the aver- Since 2004, administrators have elim-
age salary increase offered to college inated 400 staff positions and reduced
instructors by four-tenths of a percent. course offerings while simultaneously
Faced with cutbacks by the state, in streamlining operations of the Universi-
the past three years the University has ty to deal with the financial cuts and still
grappled with tens of millions of dol- maintain the University's quality of edu-
lars in budget cuts. Last July, University cation. Administrators also earmarked
President Mary Sue Coleman expressed $4.5 million this year for the recruitment
concern that the continued budget cuts and retention of top faculty.
would dull the University's competitive Phil Hanlon, associate provost for
edge in recruiting and retaining top col- academic and budgetary affairs, said
lege faculty by reducing instructors' sal- the University has been able to hold
the michigan daily

its own against other prestigious col-
leges with its modest salary increases
so far.
"But you have to be vigilant all the
time,' Hanlon said, noting that many of
the University's competitors are armed
with more resources to recruit and retain
the best professors. Failing to offer com-
petitive salaries could jeopardize the Uni-
versity's standing, he added.
But Koopman questioned the Uni-
versity's commitment to retaining its
faculty. President Coleman will receive
a $100,000 per-year bonus as a reward
for staying at the University five years.
Koopman wondered why outstanding
professors do not receive similar reten-
tion bonuses as well.
"The faculty has been very passive on

this (salary) issue," Koopman said. "In
the end the University will get what it
pays for."
The highest-paid University employee
this year is Executive Vice President
for Medical Affairs Robert Kelch, at
$637,777. Coleman ranks second with
$501,458, not including bonuses. Head
football coach Lloyd Carr will earn
$337,494.
The average staff salary increase
dipped down to 2.8 percent, slightly
below last year's raise of 3 percent. The
medical school saw only a 2.68-percent
increase in salaries this year despite a
boost in funding from grants, mainly due
to budget cuts, said ,Deb Komorowski,
director of faculty affairs at the medical
school.

MLK
Continued from page 1
son said. "He tried to fight for them as
well as racial issues."
Prahalad said in order to use
King's strategies to change , the
world, people need to study not only
the ways companies like Jaipur Foot
use innovative technology, but also
how they employ creativity.
"The transformation requires not
intellect, not money, but imagina-
tion," he said. "Dr. King imagined a
better world. We need to re-imagine
his dream."
Prahalad's book "The Fortune at the
Bottom of the Pyramid" has helped him
illustrate his dream to the public by tack-
ling the international problem of poverty
and suggesting how this issue may be
eradicated through the opening of mar-
kets geared toward the poor.
But while Prahalad's theory of
tackling poverty via consumerism
has begun a movement in the business
world to recognize poverty, he said
the movement still has further to go
and that a campus is an idea place for
it to gain momentum.
"If the University of Michigan is
going to be a global institute, do we
have an obligation to deal with these

problems as part of our work and not a
sideshow?" he said. "Otherwise, call-
ing ourselves a global university is not
done truthfully."
Every year, the MLK Symposium
committee and the Office of Academ-
ic Multicultural Initiatives sponsors
about 100 programs designed to allow
the University to unite and reflect on
King's legacy. This year, Prahalad
was granted the honor of opening the
week of events.
"We not only wanted someone well-
known but also someone to talk about
international poverty, so we chose
Prahalad," said John Matlock, associ-
ate vice provost and OAMI director.
Prahalad admitted he was sur-
prised that he was invited to speak at
the symposium, but said his work is a
reflection of King's teachings.
"MLK Day is an American holiday,
but the teachings of Dr. King address
global issues," which happen to be the
same issues Prahalad addresses, said
Gena Flynn, MLK Symposium plan-
ning committee coordinator.
Riana Anderson, president of the
University chapter of the NAACP,
said discussing poverty was an inno-
vative way to begin the symposium.
"We look at racial issues on this
campus but we don't look hardly
enough at class issues," she said.

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For Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2006
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
This is a slightly accident-prone day;
therefore, be careful. It's also a verbally
accident-prone day; therefore, think
before you speak. You can be helpful to
children now.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
Something having to do with money
and groups of friends is a bit unpre-
dictable today. Think twice before you
make a financial commitment or lend
money to anyone. Ditto for your own
possessions.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
The Moon is in your sign today; how-
ever, you feel restless. Anything can
happen! Conversations with parents,
bosses and VIPs make you feel inde-
pendent, perhaps even rebellious!
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
Dealings with the government and
large institutions are solid today. Expect
interruptions to plans and matters related
to publishing and the media. Educational
schedules will also change.
.LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
You might meet a real character today.
Alternatively, someone you know might
surprise you. Be careful about lending
money and possessions or borrowing
onwti:c Cnm thit- unnr arl t -;n zil

schedule are likely today. Just cope with
a smile. Be patient. Demonstrate grace
under pressure.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
Parents must keep an eye on children
today, because it is a mildly accident-
prone day. Romance is full of surprises.
Unexpected flirtations are unnerving but
quietly thrilling.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Be patient when talking to partners
and close friends today. Arguments can
easily erupt. People are a bit huffy and
sensitive today. Try to respect this.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Your work schedule will definitely
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surprise.)
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
Parents must be careful with children
today. Keep an eye on them. Unusual,
creative ideas will occur. Surprise flirta-
tions might please you. (It's just another'
form of admiration.)
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Go slowly at home today, because, in
haste, you might break something. Be
patient with family members, because
people are a bit jumpy and edgy today.
Qor.r.; r - nnv nld rn. y Qstck

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