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March 13, 2006 - Image 7

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 13, 2006 - 7A

FAZ
Continued from page 7A
would give them a second chance,"
said Husain's son Ali, a Business
school senior and pitcher on the
varsity baseball team.
The pizza man's oldest son sus-
pected that his father's generosity
may have been the reason that the
family chain did not achieve the
same financial success as Domino's
Pizza, which started in Ypsilanti
about the same time Husain opened
Hello Faz Pizza in 1967.
"I would be in the back working
really hard, and he would just give
out five or 10 pizzas to someone for
free," Ali Husain said.
In 2000, Husain was invited to
travel with then-president Bill Clin-
ton on a trip across the Indian sub-
continent of Asia.
"I was one of 600 people (who
Clinton invited), but I spent a lot
of time with the president," he told
The Michigan Daily afterward. "We

went jogging. We went to Parlia-
ment House.'
Husain also served on the Ypsilanti
City Council and lost a mayoral bid.
Faz Husain supported countless
community organizations ranging
from a recreational basketball team
to the Muslim Students' Association.
Engineering senior Chris Blau-
velt, president of the Muslim Stu-
dents' Association, remembered that
Husain would often give free pizzas
to the organization and deliver them
personally.
"He would always have the big-
gest smile on his face whenever he
showed up," Blauvelt said.
Husain had a habit of making per-
sonal deliveries - especially when
children were involved.
Ali Husain remembered how any-
time an elementary school ordered
pizzas, his father would make the
deliveries himself.
Faz Uncle, as he was known in
Ann Arbor Muslim community,
would tell the children he'd brought
them pizza because they were behav-

ing well.
"Sometimes (kids) would come
into the shop and show their report
card and my dad would give them
free pizza," Ali Husain said.
Although Faz Husain was not a
celebrity, his son remembered how
it always seemed that his father was
famous.
"I couldn't even go anywhere
with my dad without him talking to
a bunch of people and saying hi," Ali
Husain said.
In addition to his local fame,
Husain rubbed elbows with national
and international celebrities. The
walls of the family's tiny pizza shop
are covered with photographs- of
Husain with famous people ranging
from Mother Theresa to Bob Hope
to Hulk Hogan. These pictures are
part of an impressive hodgepodge
of autographs, newspaper clippings,
pictures and photographs featuring
Husain's family and friends.
It seems that everyone he met
became part of his family.
"The first time I met him he

told me he loved me. He said that
to everybody he knew ... and you
always knew he meant it;" said Nick
Roumel, an Ann Arbor attorney and
a regular at Hello Faz.
Hello Faz employee Don Shelton
said he would remember Husain for
his sense of humor.
Shelton previously worked in the
auto industry and came to know
Husain on deliveries.
When Husain heard that Shelton
had had his hours cut, Husain told
him "wash your hands and put on an
apron'" giving him a job on the spot.
Shelton has worked at the shop for
six months.
"Everyone he met he treated like
they were so special, and for that 30
seconds his complete focus was on
them," Ali Husain said.
The notes taped to the front win-
dow, the stream of customers look-
ing to give their condolences and
the flower bouquets left in the front
of Hello Faz Pizza indicate saying
goodbye to Faz Husain will be
anything but easy.

FALCONS
Continued from page 7A
are actually part of an instrument called a carillon.
He said of the birds' arrival: "I couldn't be happier
because it has generated an enormous amount of
interest in the carillon."
But don't worry about getting attacked - the
birds are almost oblivious to humans, Sing said.
"They don't care if the bells ring or not" he said.
"They selected the site and were using it when the
bells were ringing."
Forty years ago, peregrine falcons were consid-
ered endangered because of the widespread use
of DDT. DDT, a banned insecticide once used in
fertilizer, made its way through the food. chain.
When the insecticide reached the falcons, it had
a particularly harmful side effect: their eggshells
became so thin that they cracked when the parents
sat on them during incubation.
Since the banning of DDT in 1972, the falcons
have made a comeback, adapting especially well
to urban areas, English Prof. Macklin Smith, an

experienced bird watcher, said in an e-mail. Per-
egrines were taken off the federal endangered spe-
cies list in 1998.
Smith said he does not think Ball should stop
playing the carillon.
"When peregrines became to come back to the
east coast, in New York City, they first occupied
bridges," he said. "Think about all the honking,
and think about the vibrations from traffic. An
occasional carillon melody might seem compara-
bly pleasant."
If the birds are nesting, they will stick around
for at least another two months, Stocking said.
Smith said the peregrines' nesting might have
some unwanted side effects.
"For one thing, there will be pigeon carcasses
dropped onto the pavement below," he said, cit-
ing the way peregrines dispose of their food after
eating. peregrines attack pigeons mid-air, often
swooping from tall heights to catch their prey.
University administration should continue to be
respectful of the birds' presence, Stocking said.
This includes avoiding human contact and not
interfering further with the birds.

DIG ITIZATION
Continued from page 7A
dents often do not look beyond the shallow
facts provided by initial search engine results.
Students using search engines often think they
are great researchers when they actually aren't,
he said.
"(Search engines) turn up ideas and sources
the michigan dail
FALL 2006: QUIET & SPACIOUS 5 bed., 2
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that are 'good enough'; but in the 21st Century,
'good enough' is not good enough;' Tenner said.
Tenner said students often don't go past their
initial searches. He also pointed out that better
search engines than Google exist for scholarly
research that cluster web pages based on similar
ideas and principles rather than a random selec-
tion.
Panelists also stressed the need for greater
accessibility and communication among uni-

versities and other scholarly institutions in
order to provide information to the people who
desire it.
Michael Keller, Stanford University's chief
librarian, said that in the digital age, the con-
cept of the library as merely a building needs
to change. He stressed that libraries need to be
viewed as sources that must be open for intel-
lectual access by all, and that mass digitization
is one way to accomplish this.

BIG DANCE
Continued from page 7A
injury bug, missing a combined
five games down the stretch.
Despite the injuries, Michi-
gan was in position to cruise
into the Big Dance for much of
the season. On Feb. 1, the Wol-
-verines beat Penn State on the
road, improving their record to
16-3 and putting them in a first-
place tie in the Big Ten. But

the season soon spiraled out of
control. Michigan's 69-67 home
loss to Indiana and subsequent
first-round Big Ten Tournament
exit against lowly Minnesota
proved to be backbreakers for
the veteran Wolverine squad.
"We didn't do what we
should have, and we placed our
future in the hands of someone
else," senior Daniel Horton
said. "And we didn't handle
things like we should have,
and we lost a few ball games

towards the end."
Said Brown: "We brought
this on ourselves. We lost a sig-
nificant amount of our last 10
games, and that really hurt us."
Despite the team's late-season
swoon,many experts considered
Michigan a candidate for one of
the NCAA Tournament's final
at-large bids. But teams includ-
ing Bradley, Air Force and Utah
State swiped the final tourney
berths, crushing the Wolver-
ines' March Madness dreams.

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CHICAGOLAND'S RAMAH DAY camp is
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HOUSEKEEPER WANTED FOR 1 yr incl.
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INDIVIDUALS NEEDED FOR RE-
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Contact Paul L. Scott at piscott@umich.edu
EOAAE.
SUMMER COUNSELORS WANTED
Counselors needed for our student travel and
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The Michigan Daily
Presents:

Classifieds

i

Crawford House
1115 Willard

4H.E UMME RK
EMPI MENT SPECIAL
{ SE CT ION
Looking for a job this summer??
Whether you're staying in
Ann Arbor or looking for a job
abroad, check our the brand new,
Summer Employment Special Section on
THURSDAY, MARCH 16.
The section will feature positions from
both local and national companies...
if you need work this summer, look no
further!

For Tuesday, March 14, 2006
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
Even though things are testy at work
today, basically, you stand to benefit
from others. People are encouraging and
generous to you.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
Parents must be patient with children
today. The Full Moon has everyone
going - even the dog. However, discus-
sions with partners and close friends are
heartwarming and reassuring.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
Today's Full Moon creates tension
between you and an authority figure.
Just be polite. This tension goes away
quickly. Actually, bosses are well-
disposed to you today!
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
Travel plans, higher education, pub-
lishing and the media look fabulous
today. At first, things might have a few
glitches, but in the long run, they work
out very well!
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Disputes about shared possessions or
ownership are likely. However, if you
remain patient and friendly, you'll get a
bonus or a gift for your home or a fam-
ily member!
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)

SCORPIO
.(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
There might tension between you and
others today. It passes soon. (It's the Full
Moon.) Instead, turn your attention to
romance, vacations and sports. This is
where you shine!
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Today's Full Moon sets up a tug-of-
war between the classic areas of home
and family versus career and your exter-
nal world. Focus on home and family
today.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
This is a mildly accident-prone day.
Take extra precautions when driving,
cycling or walking. Conversations with
others are friendly and optimistic. You
feel happy today!
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
Keep an eye on your finances. Today's
Full Moon could stress money, posses-
sions and your job. Nevertheless, this is
a great day for business and commerce.
(Go figure.)
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Today's Moon opposes your sign. You
might feel a bit uptight when talking to
others. Perhaps someone is jealous of
you. Your good fortune with traveling,,
education, publishing and the media
might make others envious.
YOU BORN TODAY

22 distinctive campus locations,
eti,,lin to aver hcrrnnm

I I

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