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March 06, 2006 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-03-06

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 6, 2006 - 7A

* ROBBERIES
Continued from page 1A
incident is similar to the other two
robberies, but police have not yet
tied them together.
Flocken said he could not com-
ment on any investigation involv-
ing the robberies, but he said he
believes police are working on
leads from Wednesday's robber-
ies.

04
Conti
W
for a'
wint
Holly
really
mer
spur
expe
but "

Police are working to identify as an
subjects' for yesterday's crimes Sti
based on descriptions provided by indu
witnesses. ago t
Witnesses described the first ly tal
male as having short dark hair, Ron1
weighing 170 lbs and standing Man'
5'8" tall. The second suspect has targe
long, dark curly hair, weighs 180 with
lbs. and is 6'1" to 6'2" in height. Th
According to witnesses, the men mall
were driving a two-door, dark-col- auspi
ored car. upset
Police are urging pedestrians But t
to look assertive, avoid walk- as ca
ing alone, trust their intuition in Seym
uncomfortable situations and keep for hi
keys in hand before walking up to ally n
vehicles. given
WALLACE
Continued from page 1A
body of work is truly of historic proportions."
Communications Prof. Anthony Collings,
a former CNN correspondent, said the dona-
tion will provide an "excellent source for
scholars" writing on the impact television has
had on news coverage.
"This will be a great contribution to our
understanding of television news and how it
has evolved in the 20th and 21st centuries," he
said.
the michigan dai

SCARS
nued from page 1A
[hile most prestige films jockeying
ward recognition are released in the
er, capturing attention at the time
ywood's orgy of self-congratulation
y gets rolling, "Crash" was a sum-
flick. The season is better known for
ring ingenuity among demolitions
rts than directors and screenwriters,
Crash" was immediately recognized
inspired art film.
ll, "Crash" was no frontrunner. If
stry insiders had been told months
hat a summer release would eventual-
ke American filmmaking's top honor,
Howard's Oscar-friendly "Cinderella
would have seemed the more likely
t. "Crash" is unique. Its buzz began
its nomination.
e Academy loves surprises, but nor-
y it chooses to administer them in less
cious categories - throwing a nice
with, say, best supporting actress.
his year, every award was precisely
illed: Revered character actor Philip
nour Hoffman took home best actor
is breathtaking work in a sensation-
meaty role, Reese Witherspoon was
her official sanction as Hollywood's

next leading lady for her work as June
Carter Cash in "Walk the Line," Rachel
Weisz and Clooney took home supporting
awards right on cue, and even "Broke-
back" director Ang Lee was honored as
the year's best director.
But he was not, strangely enough, the
director of the year's best picture. It's
a spoiler for your Oscar pool to be sure
(personally, I lost eight dollars), but it's
also a reflection of the film industry.
The Academy Awards are, like any vot-
ing body, inherently political; they're not
a barometer for great filmmaking so much
as they are the official seal for Hollywood's
approbation. Witherspoon, for one, didn't
have the best performance of any actress
this year (granted, she's not bad either), but
she is a money-making star. Even moreso,
the best picture race is designed as a show-
case for the film industry's concept of its
most presentable picture, not necessarily its
most artistically deserving.
In the past decade, best pictures have
been the fusion of commercial success and
industry acclaim. Traditionally big films
like "Titanic," "Gladiator" and "Lord of
the Rings: The Return of the King" were
sure things on Oscar night. Indeed, apart
from a brief flirtation with the intellectual
small-scale ("American Beauty"), best
picture winners were all very big, very

epic - very Hollywood.
But last year's triumphant epic and long-
time frontrunner, "The Aviator," lost to a
decidedly and definitively intimate film
when "Million Dollar Baby" ran off with
the best picture Oscar. The upset belliger-
ently bucked a trend ("American Beauty"
lacked solid competition) and seemed to
signal a shift. The Academny, so long per-
ceiving ultimate filmmaking genius in the
great and grandiose, must have changed the
very way it regarded itself.
This year's nominees, discussed ad
nauseam as "small" movies outside the
major studio system, were only taken as a
confirmation. But if Hollywood's idea was
to honor the heartbreaking immediacy of
intimate character studies, why the over-
loaded "Crash," in which no character has
more than 15 minutes of screen time?
Perhaps the film struck an emotional
chord with voters; perhaps the Los Ange-
les setting was easy to relate to; perhaps
the Academy decided being a populist
institute honoring a film more people saw
was, in fact, the way to be. Perhaps they
heard one too many gay cowboy jokes.
Or perhaps the Academy is just in a cri-
sis of identity. After all, this is the insti-
tution that, as Jon Stewart so poignantly
noted, has bestowed film's top honor on
Three 6 Mafia and not Martin Scorsese.

CAMPUS DAY
Continued from page 1A
group's vice president, attributed the recent decline in
the program to an influx of Muslim students choosing
Michigan State University, Wayne State University and
the University's Dearborn campus over the Ann Arbor
campus.
Odeh said many Muslim students choose to attend
those schools because their parents don't want them to
leave home or commute long distances.
"We are a very family-oriented culture, and it's hard to
separate from family," Odeh said.
Other Muslim students, though, choose not to attend
the University because they have the perception that the
campus Muslim community is not strong enough, he
added.
LSA sophomore Hend Khatib, who also serves as out-
reach chair for the group, said the program combats that
by familiarizing high school students with campus.
"It makes U of M friendlier," Khatib said. "They learn
what the life's like for Muslim students."
According to Shuttari, the group's vice president,
about 25 percent of high school students who attend the
program end up enrolling at the University.
The recruitment program began with an educational
lecture about how to get involved in the Muslim com-
munity.
After the lecture, current students from various aca-
demic backgrounds held a panel discussion to field ques-
tions about programs such as law and business. The
Muslim Students' Association introduced students to the
Central Campus Recreational Building, where they spent
the rest of the night playing basketball and swimming.
LSA freshman Sarah Jukaku, who attended the pro-
gram for three years as a high school student, said she
enjoyed the arrangement of the CCRB because she was
able to swim while all the male students played basket-
ball. The Muslim Students' Association often has sepa-
rate activities for males and females in order to comply
with Islamic guidelines.
Jukaku said the recruitment helped her meet other
Muslim students and was an eye-opening experience
because she lived in a suburb without an established
Muslim community.
The program motivates students to attend the Univer-
sity, she added.

Collings also said the collection will be a
resource for students interested in gaining a
deeper understanding about television, and
that the collection gives us "bragging rights
as a university."
University President Mary Sue Coleman
echoed his comments.
"Mike Wallace has been, from my point of
view, hugely influential in journalism," she
said. "The sweep of history that he has seen
(is incredible)."
Wallace got his start in broadcast journal-
ism at the University's shortwave radio sta-
tion when he was a student in the 1930s.

Since his graduation, Wallace has made
several other donations to the campus com-
munity.
Wallace also serves on the board of the
Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellows, a program
that allows mid-career journalists to take a year-
long sabbatical to pursue media scholarship at
the University. He has supported the program
through financial contribution and through the
donation of the Mike and Mary Wallace House,
now the program's home base.
Wallace is also an honorary co-chairman
of the University's Michigan Difference
fundraising campaign.

"This is one of the leading universities
in the world," Wallace said. "And under the
leadership of Mary Sue Coleman, I think it
has made great strides."
A seat next to legendary Michigan football
coach Bo Schembechler in the Big House on
football Saturdays is one of his favorite spots
on campus, but Wallace added there are many
places in Ann Arbor he is fond of.
"Michigan did so very much for me in prepar-
ing my background in broadcasting," he said.
-Jeremy Davidson contributed to this
report.

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For Tuesday, March 7, 2006
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
I suggest you use tact and diplomacy
when dealing with others today. Why?.
Because it is very easy to fly off the han-
dle! (You suddenly are excited about
something, and you want to win with
your point of view.)
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
Be very careful when shopping.
Perhaps you should delay major pur-
chases for another day. You seem to be
obsessed about possessions and money
today. (It's not a good frame of mind to
be in to part with your cash.)
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
You feel willful in your discussions
with close friends or partners today.
Don't let things become a win/lose
proposition. Lighten up!
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
Somebody has ideas about how to
improve things at work. You might not
agree. This is not the time to make a big
stink about this. Just be gracious.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
A friend seems to be quite pushy
today. Possibly, you are the pushy one
with your friend? Either way, keep the
friendship by keeping the peace; You
won't regret it.

only be preaching to the choir - or to
deaf ears! Why bother? Don't even go
there.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
This is a poor day to share something
or decide how to divide an inheritance or
some shared property. People are very
territorial and opinionated today.
(Yikes!)
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Power struggles with someone close
to you could arise today. Try to see
where you might be part of this equation.
After all, it takes two to make a fight.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
You might have excellent ideas about
how to make improvements where you
work. Nevertheless, don't be forceful
with co-workers. Don't be pushy.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
Parents must be patient with children
today. Little ones can have temper
tantrums. Nothing can cure hard feelings
faster than a hug. (Just remember-that.)
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Make a special effort to be easygoing
with family members today. Don't insist
on things going your way. Compromise
is your best solution now.
YOU BORN TODAY You are a very
sensitive, giving person. People appreci-

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