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February 22, 2006 - Image 7

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, February 22, 2006 - 7

pDINGELL
Continued from page 1
things we do," he said.
The domestic surveillance dispute
is part of a broader debate regarding
overlapping foreign policy mandates
in the Constitution, which vests mili-
tary powers in both the Executive and
Legislative branches. Article I, section
8, for example, gives Congress the
exclusive ability to officially declare
war and to raise and support the army.
Article II, section 2,however, mandates
that the president is the commander in
chief of the Army and Navy.
Throughout history, Bush and

many of his predecessors have used
the commander in chief clause to jus-
tify military conflict without an offi-
cial declaration of war - such as the
Korean War, the Vietnam War and the
current war in Iraq.
Although numerous lawsuits have
challenged these actions, courts have
consistently sided with the office of the
president, in effect nullifying Congress's
power to declare war, Greene said.
"(Congress) can still decide they
don't want to finance the war," Greene
said. He used the example of the con-
flict in Bosnia, where Congress struc-
tured military funding in a way that
effectively precluded ground troops.

Responding to an audience question
about his favorite president, Dingell
commented on the 12 presidents with
whom he's had personal contact, begin-
ning with his two heroes, Franklin Del-
ano Roosevelt and Harry Truman.
Dingell used similar language to
describe Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter,
George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton,
calling them some of the most decent
and caring people he has ever met.
He praised John F. Kennedy's charm
and Lyndon Johnson's "completion of
the New Deal," while asserting that
Richard Nixon was a better president
than people give him credit for, regard-
less of his moral failures.

CARROLL
Continued from page 1
calling itself the Vengeance Brigade,
has demanded the release of all female
Iraqis in American custody by Feb. 26.
Otherwise, she will be killed.
Carroll's family issued a public appeal
yesterday, one of many efforts pushing
for her release since the Jan. 7 abduc-
tion.
Some have linked the incident with
a broad correlation between Islam and
violence, Muslim Students' Association
members said, but they said the linkage
is inaccurate because most Muslims are
not violent.

"A loud minority will ruin it for a
silent majority," said LSA junior Pauline
Lewis, who helped organize the vigil.
Lewis, who is not affiliated with either
sponsoring group, said the purpose of
the vigil was not to be political or to call
for government action.
The American government is clearly
facing -a difficult decision, she said, as
negotiations with terrorists may result
in additional abductions. She said if the
kidnappers get what they are asking for,
the terrorists have an added incentive to
commit the same act again.
Carroll is the eighth woman of 37
reporters kidnapped in Iraq since the
fighting began in March 2003. Five of

the 37 were killed. The others were safe-
ly released.
The organizers of the vigil hope the
event makes the campus community
as well as outside communities aware
that "as citizens of the world, no one is
deserving of such treatment," Jukaku
said.
In a statement distributed to those
in attendance, a couple brief sentences
summarized the motives of the vigil:
"We hope that she will not become one
of thousands of victims of the violence
in Iraq. All of us, despite religious, cul-
tural, and political differences, stand
together against such heinous crimes
against humanity."
'

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HORTON
Continued from page 1
It didn't matter.
And he had the burden of a
school's dwindling NCAA Tourna-
ment hopes resting solely on his
shoulders.
But it didn't matter.
Horton showed last night that
when he's in the zone, he can't be
stopped.
"It was phenomenal - you can
just call it that," senior co-captain
Graham Brown said of Horton's 39-
point performance. "There's nothing
else you can say about it.... Without
him, we wouldn't have been any-
where near (winning)."
Horton's coach concurred.
"I just thought that his courage,
his will and the way that he put us
on his back offensively was an abso-
lutely brilliant, brilliant game on
his part," Michigan coach Tommy
Amaker said.
The win bumped Michigan's record
to 18-7. More importantly, it gave the
Wolverines a victory against a top-
10 opponent. Just days after a 19-
point loss to rival Michigan State put
Michigan's postseason hopes in seri-
ous jeopardy, the focus in the locker
room kicked back to the conference
title race. The Wolverines remain just
two games out of first place with an
8-6 conference record.
"It puts us in a position to stay in
the hunt right now within the confer-
ence," Amaker said. "We recognize
how good Illinois has been over the
past few years. It certainly puts us
in a (good) position with a signature
win around the country."
Illinois entered the game as the
highest-ranked team in the Big
Ten. It needed a win over Michigan
to claim a share of the conference
lead.
The Illini's signature stifling
defense came into the game ranked
first in the conference. Prior to last
night's game, they had allowed 70
points just once this season prior
- a 79-74 victory over Michigan
earlier this season.
When it came to stopping seven
other Wolverines, Illinois (8-5 Big
Ten, 22-5 overall) did just that. It
shut down Michigan's fourth-ranked
Big Ten offense. It limited those
Wolverines to 10-of-27 shooting
from the field. But fortunately for
Michigan - and its up-in-the-air
tournament hopes - eight Wolver-
ines played.
And the eighth was Horton.
Horton scored 25 second-half
points, five fewer than the entire
Illini squad did, en route to a sea-
son-high 39. The amount is tops in
the Big Ten this season and is the
most Illinois has allowed a single
player to score in 12 years.
"It's frustrating when players like
Daniel Horton get open shots," Dee
Brown said. "Horton played unbe-
lievable. He came out and was abso-
lutely fantabulous."
Horton's unbelievable play didn't
seem like it would be enough in the
game's early stages.
Illinois dictated play throughout
the first half. It never trailed and
didn't allow a player other than Hor-
ton to score until midway through
the half.
But a different Michigan team
came out of the locker room for the
second half.
It went right after Illinois's
strength in the half's first five min-
utes: its 3-point defense. The Illini
entered the game allowing teams to
shoot just 30 percent from beyond
the arc - best in the Big Ten.
But Michigan came out on fire,

making five treys in the half's first
four minutes. It didn't even attempt
a two-point shot until five minutes
had passed. Horton made three, with
teammates Dion Harris and Ron
Coleman each adding one apiece.
Horton's final three during that
stretch gave Michigan a two-point
advantage, a lead it would not relin-
quish.
Illinois players were close to awe-
struck following the game. Guard
Chester Frazier said there was noth-
ing the Illini could do about Hor-
ton. Center James Augustine said
if they knew how to stop Horton,
they would have. And Illinois coach
Bruce Weber characterized Horton's

a.) read the daily
b.) do the crossword puzzle
c.) sleep and embarass yourself

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For Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2006
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
You might talk to somebody today
who actually changes your beliefs sys-
tem or your point of view about some-
thing. This person is so powerful that
you find you're influenced even more
than you suspect.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20) t
You're possessive about money or
sharedpossessions today. You want to
make sure you get your share. You're not
going to let go of something unless you
know the reason why.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
Somebody else has bright ideas about
how you can improve yourself. You
might not agree! People like this should
apply their ideas to themselves.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
You'll work very hard at your job
today. This is a good day to finish old
work and get rid of stuff you no longer
need. You might do something that is
slightly secretive or very private.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
You feel passionately attracted to
someone today. (Of course, you're a
romantic.) You want to love someone,
and you want someone to love you.
(Don't we all!)

you want others to agree with you or
acknowledge your views. (Don't try to
coerce others into your way of thinking.
Lighten up.)
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
You feel obsessed about buying some-
thing today. Perhaps you're obsessed
about earning your money in a certain
way. Either way, you can't get this idea
out of your mind.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
If you have bright ideas about how to
improve your appearance or your health,
listen to them. You're probably onto a
good thing.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Any kind of reseprch you do today
will be extremely productive. You're
willing to look under every stone.
Nothing is too much trouble. You're like
a dog with a bone.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
Powerful friends might try to persuade
you to do something today. You don't
have to. Think about this.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Conversations with bosses and parents
are intense today. You could have a
standoff with someone. People want you
to do something - but do you want to?
YOU BORN TODAY You're a sweet,

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