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February 21, 2006 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-02-21

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - 7

MONOLOGUES
Continued from page 1
The debate surrounding the casting decision
sparked great interest within the community. But
white women were not excluded.
Engineering sophomore Chelsea Haughn,
although white, stated in her bio that she was indeed
a woman of color. The color: pink.
"Pink is a delicate color. I am soft and shy and
delicate," Haughn wrote, "But pink can also be
strong and powerful."
- Haughn was one of three women to introduce the
production in an appropriately bold and unabashed-
ly graphic discussion of the problem facing women
today: finding their vaginas.
The dilemma was picked up again in "The Vagina
Workshop." LSA junior Jillian Walker recited a mono-
logue from the perspective of a shy woman attending
a workshop to help her locate the elusive organ.
Lying on a mat, she and her fellow vagina hunters
learned to reject societal taboos in order to discover
happiness in their own bodies.

Ultimately, the "Monologues" - sometimes
decried for indecency and lewdness - are about
teaching women to be comfortable in the bodies
that so many are ashamed to talk about.
Perhaps the perennial audience favorite, "My
Angry Vagina," received a particularly wonderful,
brash and fiery performance from Chang. Screaming
at the audience, and surrounded by signs emblazoned
with such mantras as "Lubricate or Die," Chang held
the audience in hysterics with her frank and shock-
ingly honest demands for vagina rights.
But V-Day is about more than just comedy.
In the poignant and emotionally devastating
"Crooked Braid," a group of woman related stories
of their mistreatment at the hands of their male
partners on an Indian reservation.
And perhaps it is this trend of continuing vio-
lence against women that, more than anything else,
makes "The Vagina Monologues" timely and essen-
tial. V-Day, which stands for Vagina, Violence and
Valentine's, asserts that women should be revered
and adored - and that until violence against women
becomes an anachronism, vaginas will continue to
scream their anger.

AUDITS
Continued from page 1
sity audit found that.some professors
had not filed paperwork explaining
what they achieved during their sab-
baticals.
The sabbaticals had cost MSU
more than $500,000.
In an e-mail to Bebow, Boulus wrote
that this might be "more of a paper-
work filing issue than a real issue."
"That's precisely why we have
effective policies to ensure that fac-
ulty research and other sabbatical
outcomes are documented," Boulus
wrote. "The vast majority of profes-
sors are complying."
Many of the problems Bebow criti-
cized have already been fixed, Boulus
said. .He cited an example of Michi-
gan Technical University's audits.
In the previous audit, done in 1993,

auditors found 31 significant prob-
lems in MTU's accounting. When
auditors returned to MTU in 2005,
they examined 17 of their 31 sug-
gestions to see if the university had
corrected them. All 17 had been rem-
edied.
"The cQhanges the auditors were
asking for were minor in the scope
of the whole audits," Peterson said.
"I certainly do not think that univer-
sities across the state have a lot of
waste. The headline was very dra-
matic, but the story just didn't back
it up."
Bebow remains confident in his
story and said he thinks officials
across the state appreciated it.
"It seems odd if President Coleman
took the time and energy out of her
very busy schedule to slander a jour-
nalist over a story that didn't even
deal with the main campus she gov-
erns," he said.

the michigan daily

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APARTMENTS
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PEPPER'S PROPERTIES. 3 bdrm. apts.
Sept. '06. Great loc. on East U. 3 blocks from
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PRIVATE/SHARED RMS. AVAIL.now
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ICC Stud. Co-ops, 662.4414 www.icc.coop
RIVER'S EDGE APARTMENTS! Half off
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ROOMS FOR RENT avail immed. Campus
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THREE BEDROOM HOUSE located five
blocks to UM Central Campus. Laundry and
parking, call Michigan Realty, 734-662-5500
or www.michcomrealty.com
4

TREE CITY PROPERTIES
Houses Available 2006
7 Bdrm: 1102 Prospect $3600 Fall'06
5 Bdrm: 407Hamilton $2850 Fall'06
3Bdrm: 1219Packard $1650 Fall'06
2 Bdrm: 506 S. Fifth ave $1200 Fall'06
6 Bdrm: 340 S. Division $ 3600 Fall'06
Check website for more houses & apartments!
www treecityproperties.com
734-994-8733.
WILSON WHITE COMAPNY
LEASING FOR
Spring/Fai 2006
Availability and pricing listed at
www.wilsonwhitecompany.com
Call us to set up a showing
(734) 995-9200
Equal Housing Opportunity
YOUR MOM WANTS you to live with U of
M's finest realtor.
PRIME STUDENT HOUSING
761-8000 primesh.com

$1000 REWARD!
Sublet 1 bdrm. through November. Must
qualify. Call 928-532-2837.
AVAILABLE NOW & MAY!!
Campus 2 and 3 bedroom apartments
Fumished and reasonably priced
Call 734.668.1100 or stop
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SP/SU 1115 WILLARD - CRAWFORD
HOUSE. 6 Bdrm., 2 full baths, lrg. ktch., cen-
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SUBLET FOR RENT. 1 bdrm. 1303
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The Michigan Daily Classifieds
Presents:
C) }
- / \ /
-HXUMMER'
EMPLYMENT SPECIAL.
SE CTION
Looking for a job this summer??
Whether you're staying in
Ann Arbor or looking for a job
abroad, check our the brand new,
Summer Employment Special Section on
THURSDAY, MARCH 16.
The section will feature positions from
both local and national companies...
if you need work this summer, look no
further!
PAID GRADUATE STUDENTS Wanted.
For details, go to www.jp-mc.com and click
on Become a JP-Management Consulting Ex-
pert on the Home Page.
PART-TIME ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT.
Innovative manufacturing company seeks a
professional and motivated individual to as-
sist part-time in our accounting department.
Responsibilities would include posting cash,
invoicing and other miscellaneous clerical du-
ties. Qualified candidate must be detail ori-
ented and accurate with numbers. Hours are
monday thru Friday, 1-5pm. Send resumes to
human resources 43850 Plymouth Oaks
Blvd. Plymouth, MI 48170. E-mail
hr@dieb.com
POSITIONS AVAILABLE IN ADVERTIS-
ING! The Michigan Daily is now hiring Ac-
count Executives for the SP/SU, Fall and
Winter terms. Gain business experience and
build your resume as a Michigan Daily Ac-
count Executive while attending school.
As a Display Advertising Account Executive,
you will: sell advertising to local and na-
tional businesses, manage your own account
teitoy, create ad copy layout and eam com-
mission-based pay.
Applications are available at the Student Pub-
lications Building on 420 Maynard, or call
764-0662 for more information. Deadline is
Thursday, Feb. 23, so act soon! Don't wait
until you graduate to get the experience you
need!
SWIM COACH--CLUB WOLVERINE
Wolverine Aquatics, a USS swimming pro-
gram based in A2, seeks assistant coaches for
all levels. Contact David Whitehead at
649-7999 or david.whitehead@gmail.com
SWIMMING POOL SERVICE and
construction. Fast paced outdoor work,
weekends off. Top pay for hard working, self-
motivated people to work in the NW
DETROIT SUBURBS. 248-477-7727.
WANTED: LT. PERSON for local company
w/ multiple offices. Send resumes to
missy@missycaulk.com
WOLVERINESNEEDJOBS.COM
We need Paid survey takers in Ann Arbor.
100% FREE to join. Click on Suveys.
WOMEN NEEDED FOR research study:
The Possibilities Project @ the UM School
of Nursing is seeking women between the
ages of 18 & 35 who are curently experienc-
ing any of the following symptoms: binge
eating, vomiting, using laxatives or water
pills, excessive exercising, fasting, being un-
derweight due to dieting, missing menstrual
periods. Participants will receive 20 wks. of
psychotherapy & nutritional counseling @
no cost. Compensation up to $275 for partici-
pation. For more info., call 1-800-742-2300,
#2000 or email possibilities@umich.edu
www.umich.edu-~possibil

BURNS PARK FAMILY seeks
for delightful children 7 and 4.1
Wed. late afternoons, other days7
Call 734-769-0183.

babysitter
Mon. and
negotiable.

HELP CLOSE EARLY childhood center 3-5:-
30, M-F Work w/young children. Great exp.
for education, psych. or nursing/medical stu-
dents. Fun job. Call the director at St. Paul
Early Childhood Center. 668-0887. $8/hr.,
start mid April.
P/I NANNY IN South Lyon area, Mon.,
Thur., Fri. Ref req. 248-437-4535.
WANTED IN DOWNTOWN A2 HOME.
30-40 hours, May-Aug., 20 hrs. Fall and Win-
ter term. Call 734-323-3918.

WORK ON MACKINAC Island this Season-
The Island House Hotel and Ryba's Fudge
Shops are looking for seasonal help in all ar-
eas: Front Desk, Bellstaff, Waitstaff, and
Sales Clerks. Housing available, bonus, and
discounted meals. Call Ryan at
1(800)626-6304 www.theislandhouse.com

ASH TREES
Continued from page 1
be infected.
The removal campaign will be
costly. According to Sicheneder, some
of the work will be contracted to pri-
vate companies, which will amount to
a cost of $3 million alone. Containing
the infestation in all of southeast Mich-
igan would cost about $100 billion.
Exactly how the beetle reached the
United States is unclear.
It was first found in southeastern
Michigan in the summer of 2002.
Since then, it has been spotted in Ohio,
Indiana and even Windsor, Ontario
according to emeraldashborer.info
- a website created by Ohio, Michi-
gan and Indiana to provide up-to-date
information.
According to David Cappaert, a
researcher at Michigan State Univer-
sity who studies the beetles, there are
two possibilities.
The first is that it arrived here from
ship waste in Canton Township.
The second is the Detroit Metro air-
port. Cappaert said the insect might
have been introduced in the U.S. multi-
ple times, and the reason for this infes-
tation is "just a statistics game."
Once the beetle took hold in the
United States, it spread through fire-
wood and landscape trees, Cappaert
said.
Replanting plans entail using a wide
variety of trees "so that if a new pest
came we wouldn't lose a lot of our
urban forest," Sicheneder said. The city
plans on involving residents and civic
groups in the replanting efforts.
CAPS
Continued from page 1
sis." and therefore wait several weeks
for an appointment.
"For a student to demand to be seen
is an unrealistic expectation," said a
Finding Voice member who preferred
to remain anonymous. "One problem
with students who are dealing with
mental illness is that there is a lot of
shame and guilt."
The member said, "It's hard to know
that you are in crisis, and the language
doesn't define what a 'crisis' is."
Sevig said some centers use staff to
determine what constitutes an "emer-
gency" through an evaluation, but
CAPS leaves the decision up to the stu-
dent instead.
Finding Voice President Mark Ter-
rell said the organization has been urg-
ing CAPS to implement a system in
which a counselor would briefly meet
with every student filling out an appli-
cation form in order to evaluate the
urgency of the individual case.
CAPS is restricted by a lack of
resources, Sevig said.
Terrell also complained that CAPS
crisis counseling is restricted to busi-
ness hours.
"Most crises don't occur between 8
and 5 p.m.," Terrell said.
Another potential deterrent for stu-
dents seeking help is the informed con-
sent agreement, which is printed on the
back of the application form.
The agreement could deter stu-
dents from seeking psychological help
because the form says regulatory boards
in certain fields including law, medicine
and government may "ask you to autho-
rize disclosure" of CAPS records.
Even if the student signs the agree-
ment, the board seeking to obtain the
records must get a second consent from
the student in order to be granted the
records, according to Vicki Hays, asso-
ciate director of CAPS.
This is a state-implemented policy.
Only about 5 percent of studentssign

the form, Hays said.
Hays estimated there were 10 to 12
requests from boards to release infor-
mation last semester.
All CAPS records are destroyed after
seven years, Hays said.
Some students have questioned the
types of issues CAPS focuses on.
Ruelle said that CAPS "seems to be
more concerned with academic and
stress-related problems, and not so
much with mental health problems."
CAPS organizes 12 to 15 support
groups on a variety of issues such as
relationship problems and stress man-
agement, Sevig said.
But it was only a week ago, at the
writing of Finding Voice, that CAPS
created a support group for students
with depression.
"Depression is the number-one rea-
son that students seek counseling,'
Douce said.
Stress and anxiety-related problems
are the second, relationship problems
are the third and family problems are
the fourth.
Although Sevig said CAPS is the
primary place for students to seek psy-
chological counseling, the University
also operates a Depression Center that
offers individual mental health assess-
ments and counseling appointments.
The center currently has a six- to
eight-week wait for a first appoint-

ft

you've
been
served

Daily Classifieds:
serving the UofM
community for
hundreds upon
hundreds or so
years..

!!! FREE ROOMATE FINDER Let us find
your perfect match. Call 741-9300.

CAMPUS CLEANERS: PROF. Dry Clean-
ing & L.dry. Free summer storage. 1305 S.
University next to Campus Rental. 662-1906.
THESIS EDITING. LANGUAGE, organiza-
tion, format. All disciplines. 25 yrs. exp.
996-0566 or writeon@htdconnect.com

MONDAY SPECIAL
4 Chipattis
TUESDAY SPECIAL
4 Quesadillas
www.GOOD-TIME-CHARLEYS.com
1140 SOUTH UNIVERSITY AT CHURCH 734-668-8411 .

: '"'
5 .

!!!BARTENDER WANTED!!! $300 a day
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$9.00/HR. MICHIGAN TELEFUND is now
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line: www.telefund.umich.edu or 763-4400.
BECOME A DELL CAMPUS REP-Earn
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starts immed. Go to: repnation.con/dell to ap-
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DANCE INSTRUCTORS- BALLET, Jazz,
Hip-Hop, Lyrical and Irish Step instructors
needed for a reputable, growing dance stu-
dio. Enthusiastic, qualified and experienced
applicants please forward your resume to
dancesteps@comcast.net or Human Re-
sources, P.O. Box 673, Saline, MI 48176.
DOMINICK'S NOW HIRING all positions
for spring F/T. Call 734-323-5021.
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR law firm look-
ing for bright, personable, professional office
assistant. Flexible schedule approx. 15-20
hrs/wk. Afternoons needed. Email available
hours and attach your cover letter and resume
to Zac at zbensinger@mrglawyers.com
EARN $4,000! Be an Egg Donor. Must be
20-29 years of age and a non-smoker. Please
call Alternative Reproductive Resources at
248-723-9979 or visit www.arrl.com to leam
more.
GET PAID TO Drive a Brand New Car!

For Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2006
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
You might make long-range plans
about children today, especially with
regard to their education. Later in the
day, surprise news from the media inter-
ests you.
TAURUS
I (April 20 to May 20)
Now is the time to make financial
plans, especially about shared property
or something you hold jointly with
someone else. Someone unusual or a
group or a friend has surprising news
today.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
Discussions with partners are practical
and serious today. However, discussions
with bosses might catch you by surprise.
Unusual glitches with technology are
likely.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
You find it easy to do careful, detailed
work today. You won't make mistakes.
Your powers of concentration are excel-
lent. Be prepared for computer crashes
or power outages.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
You're serious about your sense of
responsibility regarding children today.
Artists can make long-range plans about
their work. However, support from oth-
ers might be jeopardized.

SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
If you shop today, you will want to
buy practical, long-lasting items.
Interruptions due to entertaining diver-
sions are likely. You might sponta-
neously buy something hi-tech or mod-
ern.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
You're in a serious frame of mind
today. You're taking a long-range view
of things. Interruptions having to do with
home and family are likely. (You might
get a call at work.)
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
You're wondering how you can make
the best use of other people's resources.
You might also seek help from the gov-
ernment today. This is an accident-prone
day. Be careful when walking and driv-
ing.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
Seek out advice from someone older
or more experienced than you. You could
get some good, solid help. A friend
might surprise you with money or a gift.
Alternatively, you might lose money or a
gift.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Discussions with bosses about your
future on the job are likely today. Listen
to what is said. Even though you feel
rebellious about something, don't quit

CDm

i ik lk . .--"%

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