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February 16, 2006 - Image 7

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 7A

GRIOT
Continued from page 1A
to pass on family traditions, according to
Mamadou Diouf, an Afroamerican and Afri-
can Studies professor.
"(Griots) are called 'the people of the
word,' men and women with extraordinary
memories and rhetorical talents," Diouf said.
"They are the repositories of traditions and
history of families and communities."
Like the traditional griots, James's grand-
mother inherited the stories from her own
family, although she never performed them
to anyone outside her family.
"She never really performed in public, but
I took it to the public," James said.
Storytelling inspires children to find out
more about their ancestry, which in turn
helps strengthen their identity as African
Americans, James said.
In 1977, the tradition garnered wide-
spread public attention after Alex Haley
published "Roots," a Pulitzer-Prize win-
ning book.
In "Roots," Haley uncovered his ances-
try in Africa through the griot in the vil-
lage where his ancestors came from.
James said the book, along with the
Civil Rights Movement, inspired African
Americans to become more interested in
their family histories.
"People wanted to go back and find out
more," she said.
Storytelling has also become increas-
ingly popular among other minority groups,
she said.
She used the example of "Memoirs of a
Geisha" to signify the importance of story-
telling in other communities.
the michigan dE

The book was written by Arthur Golden,
a white man.
James said although she did not want to
discredit Golden's talent, she felt that a Jap-
anese woman's story could not be correctly
portrayed by anyone other than a Japanese
woman.
"Until the person who's a member of the
group tells the story, you really don't get
the fullness of the beauty," she said.
James's story began when her grand-
mother visited Belle Isle and saw two men
walking on the frozen river.
"My grandmother knew they couldn't
possibly get through the water. What were
they going to do?" James said.
The two men then dug a hole when they
stopped walking, and her grandmother real-
ized that they were ice fishing, something
she had never seen before. The two men,
James said, never caught any fish when her
grandmother sat on the shore and watched.
Later on, a young man came to fish.
Unlike the two old men who arrived first,
the young man caught one fish after anoth-
er, James said. Desiring to catch more fish,
one of them went to talk to the young man,
hoping to obtain some tips on fishing. But
the man only came back with some unrec-
ognizable rambling.
Exasperated, James said, the other man
took on the mission to talk to the young
man. During the first try, the man only
heard the rambling. He took off his ear-
muffs and asked again, but the young man
spitted out a string of rambling. The man
was confused by the young man's language.
He stood there and didn't know what to do,
James said. Eventually, the young man
spitted out his gum and said: "I said you
gotta keep the big worms!"

DATING
Continued from page 1A
American men are married to white
spouses and 37.1 percent of Japanese
females have a white husband.
Japanese interracial dating is com-
mon compared with other Asian Amer-
ican groups, especially South Asians,
Chinese and Vietnamese, which all
had interracial marriage rates below
20 percent.
American culture Prof. Phillip
Akutsu said Japanese Americans are
often more assimilated in the United
States than other Asian groups because
they tended to immigrate earlier.
"If you live three, four generations
in the U.S., you're much more accul-

turated," Akutsu said. "(The Japanese)
have come to see themselves as being
American."
Music school senior Luci Kagaya,
who is half Japanese and half white,
said Japanese immigrants she knows
engage in interracial dating because
they think it's "cool" to date someone
who is white, black or from another
cultural group.
Chinese Americans and Indian
Americans have relatively low rates of
interracial dating.
Akutsu said both groups recently
immigrated, and that this may contrib-
ute to low rates of interracial dating
because they are more likely to have
stronger ties to their heritage.
Statistics also show that Asian
women are more likely to marry out-

side of their race than Asian men.
For example, 83.1 percent of Filipino
men marry Filipino American women,
while only 62.7 percent of Filipino
American women marry within their
ethnicity.
LSA junior Stephen Lin, who is a
Chinese American, said he believes
one reason is that negative stereotypes
of Asian males are prevalent in the
media.
"You definitely see more Asian
women with a non-Asian guy and
not the other way around," Lin said.
"(In the media), white guys are more
confident, more aggressive than
Asian guys."
Asian men are often portrayed as
nerds who are asexual, quiet, socially
awkward and good at martial arts,

Akutsu said. He said stars Jet Li and
Jackie Chan have never acted in mov-
ies where they had serious romantic
relationships with non-Asian women.
He said these stereotypes persist
because white Americans usually
don't have much interaction wifh
Asian Americans, especially since
they only make up 4 percent of the
U.S. population.
Kagaya said Asian females are also
often stereotyped in the media.
"Some white guys think Asian girls are
more exotic and subservient," she said.
Akutsu also said Asian women are
portrayed as hypersexual in the media. lie
used actress Lucy Liu as an example.
"A lot of non-Asians ask (Asian)
women out hoping that they will fulfill
these stereotypes," Akutsu said.

ORDINANCE
Continued from page 1A
period has passed. Showing the house to prospective
tenants would be allowed after a quarter of the lease
period has passed.
The staggering of the dates is intended to allow
students a month to look at houses and make a more
informed choice before signing a lease.
It would be illegal for the city to set specific dates for
when renters can enter into a lease.
The ordinance has underlined the tension between
students and landlords in Ann Arbor. "It's a blame
game right now," said Laura Van Hyfte, MSA's City
Council liaison. "Students and landlords blame each
other for the market pressure."
The language would only affect September-to-Sep-
tember leases. Though the committee feels that most

leases are designed in this manner, there is some con-
cern that landlords may begin changing their lease
dates to a May-to-May format.
Van Hyfte said if landlords make the change, it will
prove that they are intent on creating market pressure.
"It would show they were trying to destroy the ordi-
nance," she said.
Cith Council and committee member Leigh Greden
(D-Ward 3) said he is in favor the ordinance.
"The negative impact on landlords will be min-
imal, but the positive impact for students will be
substantial," he said.
The committee also said the University could aid its
cause by shifting the housing fair back to fit the new
lease-signing date.
"I think this ordinance will be even stronger if the
University moves the date it holds its housing fair,"
committee member Wendy Woods (D-Ward 5) said.
Much of the meeting was consumed by partisan ten-

sion between Students 4 Michigan, the dominant MSA
party, and the Michigan Progressive Party, which plans
to challenge S4M in next month's elections.
MPP member Matt Stoker spoke repeatedly about
a Feb. 3 meeting that MPP members had with Mayor
John Hieftje. Stoker's comments were dismissed as
partisanship by some S4M members.
"It was just supposed to be students meeting with
City Council members," said Van Hyfte of S4M.
S4M members said MPP was trying to take tQo
much credit for the ordinance.
"If we want to get technical about it, S4M was there
from the start," Van Hyfte said. "MPP met two weeks
ago on something we've been working on for months."
Walter Nowinski, MPP's vice presidential candidate,
said the party invitedVan Hyfte and MSA President Jesse
Levine - a former member of S4M who became non-
partisan after being elected president - to the meeting.
Van Hyfte, though, said she had never been contacted.

bmwmmwdMWIMMbw=mmwfi
IL41ro

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734-323-3918.
NORTH CAMPUS 1 & 2 bdrm. apts. avail.
immed., May & August! Dogs welcome!
FREE winter shuttle around Central & North
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OFFICE SPACE AVAIL. at 410 E. William,
2 waiting rms., 2 baths., all utils. included,
weekly cleaning services. oldtownreal-
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PEPPER'S PROPERTIES. 3 bdrm. apts.
Sept. '06. Great loc. on East U. 3 blocks from
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PRIVATESHARED RMS. AVAIL.now
and fall/winter. $203419/mo. + food/utils.
ICC Stud. Co-ops, 662.4414 www.icc.coop
RIVER'S EDGE APARTMENTS! Half off
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ROOMS FOR RENT avail. immed. Campus
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STUDIO APT. U Towers, Feb.-Aug. 2006
$750/mo. 12th flr. Heat & H20 incl. Robert:
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THREE BEDROOM HOUSE located five
blocks to UM Central Campus. Laundry and
parking, call Michigan Realty, 734-662-5500
or www.michcomrealty.com

WILSON WHITE COMPANY, INC.

LEASING FOR
Spring/Fall 2006
Availability and Pricing listed at
www.wilsonwhitecompany.com
734.995.9200.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
YOUR MOM WANTS you to live with U of
M's finest realtor.
PRIME STUDENT HOUSING
761-8000 primesh.com

AVAILABLE NOW & MAY!!
Campus 2 and 3 bedroom apartments
Fumished and reasonably priced
Call 734.668.1100 or stop
in at 625 Church St.

INDIVIDUALS NEEDED FOR RE-
SEARCH STUDIES: The Pfizer Research
Clinic in Ann Arbor is seeking healthy men
ages 18 to 55, for participation in upcoming
drug research studies. Study participation re-
quires a stay of 10 to 20 days in the Research
Clinic. Individuals will be paid for participa-
tion in study activity. Payment for study par-
ticipation ranges from $1800-$2500. You
must not take daily perscription medications
or have any chronic illness. You must be a
non-smoker or light-smoker to be eligible. A
pre-screening process is required. For more
information, call the Research Recruiters at
1-800-567-8804. Pfizer Research Clinic 2800
Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48105.
POSITIONS AVAILABLE IN ADVERTIS-
ING! The Michigan Daily is now hiring Ac-
count Executives for the SP/SU, Fall and
Winter terms. Gain business experience and
build your resume as a Michigan Daily Ac-
count Executive while attending school.
As a Display Advertising Account Executive,
you will: sell advertising to local and na-
tional businesses, manage your own account
territory, create ad copy layout and eam com-
mission-based pay.
Applications are available at the Student Pub-
lications Building on 420 Maynard, or call
764-0662 for more information. Deadline is
Thursday, Feb. 23, so act soon! Don't wait
until you graduate to get the experience you
need!
REAL LIFE LIVING SERVICES is accept-
ing applications for Direct Support Staff
working with people with disabilities. Great
for people w/ experience in OT, PT, ST,
Psych., Social Work, Nursing, Human Ser-
vices! $7.75-$8/hr. Applicants must be 18
yrs. of age, possess valid, unrestricted drivers
license and have a H.S. diploma/GED. (734)
222-6076 ext. 202. EOE. 1100 N. Main St.,
#101,AnnArbor,MI 48104.
STUDENT WEB PROGRAMMER needed
for contracted project with AA web com-
pany. PHP, Jscript, MySQL required. AJAX
a big plus. $2500 for approx 30hrs. work.
Contact work@resumewriters.com

MACKINAC ISLAND RESORT Hotel and
fine dining restaurant seeking summer staff
for all positions. Go to
www.iroquoishotel.com and fill out an online
application or contact Marti at 906-643-8293
for further info.
SUMMER COUNSELORS WANTED
Counselors needed for our student travel and
pre-college enrichment programs, middle
school enrichment, and college admissions.
prep. Applicants must be 21 years old by
June 20th and possess a valid driver's license.
We need: Mature, Hardworking, Energetic in-
dividuals who can dedicate 4-7 weeks men-
toring and supervising teens. To receive in-
formation or apply please visit
www.summerfun.com or 800-645-6611.

HELP CLOSE EARLY childhood center 3-5:-
30, M-E Work w/young children. Great exp.
for education, psych. or nursing/medical stu-
dents. Fun job. Call the director at St Paul
Early Childhood Center. 668-0887. $8/hr.,
start mid April.

BURNS PARK FAMILY seeks babysitter
for delightful children 7 and 4. Mon. aqd
Wed. late afternoons, other days negotiable.
Call 734-769-0183.
CHILD DEVELOPMENT OR Nursing ma-
jor wanted for childcare. 30-40 hours, May-
Aug., 20 hrs. Fall and Winter term. $10/hour
in downtown A2 home. Call 734-323-3918.

NORTH CAMPUS SUBLET Huge apt. on
3rd fir. 5 mins. from classes on North. Free
prkg., gym, laudormat, elevators, pool. Bldg.
100% occupied. Rent: Neg. 703.371.5549.
SP/SU 1115 WILLARD - CRAWFORD
HOUSE. 6 Bdrm., 2 full baths, Irg. -ktch., cen-
tral air, Irg. common rm. fully fumished. Call
Today! Brittany (786) 586-2083.

BABYSITER NEEDED FOR toddler. Flex.
hrs. Pfr weekdays. AA, own car. Contact
nanalee03@yahoo.com with availibility, 2
refs. & short resume.
P/T NANNY IN South Lyon area, Mon.,
Thur., Fri. Ref. req. 248-437-4535.

!!! FREE ROOMATE FINDER Let us find
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GREAT, REMODELED 2 bdm. apt. 4 min.
walk to Campus. $850/mo. Avail, now to
Fall. Prkg., heat, H2O, coin Idry. 973-7368.
LARGE 1 BDRM. near union/Law School.
Hardwood/carpet with decorative fireplace.
LdryJprkg. Avail. Sept. Lse. $795. 761-3821.
LARGE FURNISHED 3 bdrm. apt. on S.
State, Near UM bus stop, 5 min. to Mich.
Union. Avail. Now, winter, Fall '06. Heat &
water incl. Balc., A/C, prkg., ldry. $1400
-$1550. No smkg.no pets. 734-996-3539 or
934-678-7250. ehtseng~comcastnet
LARGE ROOMS IN REMODELED
HOUSE. Also, 2 room suites. Now to fall.
New furm., deluxe kitch., ldry., great prkg. 6
min. walk to main campus. 973-7368.
LOOKING FOR 2006-2007 housing. We
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Most incl. heat and water. Parking avail. for
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LOW SEC. DEP., $1,200 OFF W/ 1 YR.
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Heat incl. & pets O.K. Beautiful, landscaped
grounds, lg. walk-in closets. 734-663-8463.
MAY LEASES AVAIL.!!! Studio to 3 bed-
room apts. on Central Campus. 741-9300.
MCKINLEY TERRACE LARGE 1 & 2
bdrm. apts. near business/law school. FREE
winter shuttle around central & north cam-
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SUBLET FOR RENT. 1 bdnm. 1303
Granger. $680/mo. Call 734-327-0529.

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7 Bdrm:
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TREE CITY PROPERTIES
Houses Available 2006
1102 Prospect $3600 May '06
407 Hamilton $3000 Fall '06
1219 Packard $1650 Fall '06
506S.Fifth ave $1200 Fall'06
340 S. Division $ 3600 Fall '06

CAMPUS CLEANERS: PROE Dry Clean-
ing & Ldry. Free summer storage. 1305 S.
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v

""""

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iza-
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734-994-8733.

SWIM COACH--CLUB WOLVERINE/
Wolverine Aquatics, a USS swimming pro-
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all levels. Contact David Whitehead at
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NEAR UNION: CONTEMPORARY studios
to 3 bdrm. apts. 741-9300.
www.annarborapartments.net
-o
aOc
1 (D

Open House

!!!BARTENDER WANTED!!! $300 a day
potential, Age 18+ ok. No experience neces-
sary, training provided. 800-965-6520 x 125.
$9.00/HR. MICHIGAN TELEFUND is now
hiring. Awesome Resume Builder! Apply on-
line: www.telefund.umich.edu or 763-4400.
CONTRIBUTE TO SCIENCE and eam $7!
UM undergraduates needed to complete a 30
min. questionnaire. Email values@umich.edu
Behav Sci IRB#: HUM00003798, IRB Ap-
proval Date: 1/28/06.
DANCE INSTRUCTORS- BALLET, Jazz,
Hip-Hop, Lyrical and Irish Step instructors
needed for a reputable, growing dance stu-
dio. Enthusiastic, qualified and experienced
applicants please forward your resume to
dancesteps@comcast.net or Human Re-
sources, PO. Box 673, Saline, MI 48176.
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for spring FI'. Call 734-323-5021.
EARN $4,000! Be an Egg Donor. Must be
20-29 years of age and a non-smoker. Please
call Alternative Reproductive Resources at
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more.
GET PAID TO Drive a Brand New Car!
Eam $800-$3200 a month to drive!

SWIMMING POOL SERVICE and
construction. Fast paced outdoor work,
weekends off. Top pay for hard working, self-
motivated people to work in the NW
DETROIT SUBURBS. 248-477-7727.
WOLVERINESNEEDJOBS.COM
We need Paid survery takers in Ann Arbor.
100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys.
WOMEN NEEDED FOR research study:
The Possibilities Project @ the UM School
of Nursing is seeking women between the
ages of 18 & 35 who are currently experienc-
ing any of the following symptoms: binge
eating, vomiting, using laxatives or water
pills, excessive exercising, fasting, being un-
derweight due to dieting, missing menstrual
periods. Participants will receive 20 wks. of
psychotherapy & nutritional counseling @
no cost Compensation up to $275 for partici-
pation. For more info., call 1-800-742-2300,
#2000 or email possibilities@uinich.edu
www.umich.edu/-possibil

For Thursday, Feb. 16, 2006
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
This is a good day for serious discus-
sions with close friends and partners.
Now is the time to make long-term
plans. You might also want to decide
how to shoulder the responsibility for
something.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
You can get a lot done at work today.
In particular, choose tasks that require
great attention to detail. You have the
necessary patience to attend to this now.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
Discussions about the responsibilities
of children will go well today. You might
also be in a position to give children
advice. Possibly, someone advises you
about these matters as well.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
Whatever you buy for your home
today will be practical and long lasting.
Discussions with a parent or someone
older will be fruitful.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
You're not in the mood for trivial
activities today. You want to work. You
want to accomplish something. You're
taking a long-range view of things, and
you want results.
VIRGO
(Am.?3to Sent 22)

from others. If you want this, you'll get
it!
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
Work alone or by yourself if you can
today. This is how you will get the most
done. This is a good day to research
things or dig deep for answers and solu-
tions.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Someone older or more experienced
can offer you advice today. Quite possi-
bly, you're the older, more experienced
individual handing out advice. Either
way, it's a good thing.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
You will say something that impresses
people today. They'll notice you. You'll
be viewed as wise, practical and the
voice of experience (no matter what your
age).
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
This is the day to make serious, long-
range plans about travel, especially with
a partner. You might also come to an
agreement about legal or medical mat-
ters.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
You will be very fair if you have to
divide something with someone today,
You take your responsibilities and obli-
gations seriously today.
VU BORN TODAV V m're mimnan

February 18, 2006
1-4 PM

ATTN. INTERNATIONAL UNDERGRAD.
students: Michigan Infectious Disease Inter-
national Scholars announces a summer re-

" r

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