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February 14, 2006 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-02-14

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, February 14, 20Q6 - 7

* ASTRONAUTS
Continued from page 1
ics like Flash Gordon. Piloting airplanes
seemed a more likely reality; his father had
built bombers during World War II.
Lousma took an interest in planes at a young
age, a fascination that followed him through-
out his life.
Yet sometimes he read comics on space
travel, thinking it might happen one day. His
mother told him to forget about space travel.
"You are wasting your time. It's never going
to happen," Lousma recalls his mother say-
mg.
The onset of the Cold War, however, led
America to steadily pull its way to the final fron-
tier and declare space travel a national priority.
In tandem, another new career rose in
demand as well: the jet pilot. With aero-
space development intensifying and his
interest in airplanes still lingered, Lous-
ma switched to the field of aeronautical
engineering during his freshman year in
1954, and by junior year he had joined the
Marines. After he graduated in 1959, Lous-
ma went to flight school, getting his wings
as a marine attack squadron pilot.
It wasn't until 1965 that a newspaper called
his attention to space flight: NASA was seek-
ing applicants for a new group of astronauts.
Coupled with the possibility of career advance-
ment, Lousma's sense of duty'to his country
and the challenge pushed him to apply.
"I thought I probably will never make this.
But I would kick myself if I never took the
chance," he said.
After numerous tests, in April 1966, NASA
selected him as one of 30 new recruits to
become an astronaut, and he began his train-
ing by assisting the Apollo missions. For seven
years, Lousma sat on the astronaut bench,
waiting for his flight.
The year before, all eyes were on another
pair of University alumni who had made a his-
toric leap in the space race.
James McDivitt and Edward White, both
Air Force pilots and best friends, flew on
Gemini 4 in 1965, the first American space
flight to conduct a space walk.
Like with Lousma, being an astronaut
mainly smacked of career opportunity, said
McDivitt, who is now 76. And McDivitt didn't
really want any of it.
"I didn't really want to be an astronaut. I

liked my job (as an Air Force pilot)," McDivitt
said. "But the Air Force had sent me to the
University and I thought it would be appropri-
ate to repay them for it."
In 1962, NASA selected the two friends to
become astronauts. McDivitt would later fly
on Apollo 9 in 1969 and even turned down
a future moon mission in favor of becoming
a program manager for subsequent Apollo
flights. Assuming a command role took pre-
cedence over space flight for McDivitt.
As for White, space flight claimed his life
in the 1967 Apollo 1 fire.
Lousma was fully aware of the risks, having
come face-to-face with them while working
as a support crew member during the ill-fated
Apollo 13 flight, which abandoned its mission
to the moon after a serious malfunction.
He had trained hard to prepare himself for
the dangers, but he could do nothing in the face
of funding cuts and rescheduling after NASA
canceled the final three Apollo moon missions,
one of which Lousma was slated to fly on.
"I was very disappointed, but it was clear
there wasn't much we could do about that '
Lousma said. "We looked forward to a flight
in the future."
And NASA didn't disappoint. For two
months, Lousma and his crew conducted more
than 300 medical experiments on board the
recently launched Skylab space station.
Upon returning to the Earth with a loss in
bone mass and weight due to lack of gravity in
space, Lousma recalled a sense of professional
satisfaction.
"We were alive and we accomplished our
mission," he added.
The astronaut today
Lousma later returned to space on a test flight
of the space shuttle Columbia in 1982, but left
NASA in 1983 to pursue other challenges, like
starting a few businesses and even running for a
U.S. Senate seat in Michigan the next year.
Now semi-retired and living in Ann Arbor,
Lousma says he doesn't really have the urge
to fly back into space. Aside from his age, the
years of training and NASA's tendency to can-
cel flights remind him of the obstacles to swift
space travel. It's a challenge he's conquered
and has no need to revisit.
But some of the thrill remains.
"If they were going to say I was going to fly
to the space station with three months of train-
ing, I would do it," he said.

BILLS
Continued from page 1
on behalf of the hate crimes legislation.
Sean Kosofsky, Triangle's director of
policy, said he thought the civil rights bill
has a greater chance of getting a hearing
than the hate crimes legislation.
"I think the civil rights bill should be
the most basic and palatable legislation,"
Kosofsky said. "I believe if they allowed a
vote on it today it would be close."
Triangle has switched its focus to two new
bills: one to allow second-parent adoption
and another to prevent school bullying.
The second parent adoption law would
allow a non-parent to assume custody of a
child if the current parent or other custo-
dian is unable to take care of the child. This
is especially relevant for gay couples who
want to share custody of a child.
The bullying bill - which would require
public schools to define, investigate and
punish incidents of bullying - has earned
support from the governor and some House
Republicans.
The bill has gained LGBT support
because it would aim to stop all forms of
bullying, including gender-related.
Triangle is working to build a coalition of
religious leaders, business groups and other
community members to press legislators to
pass these bills. The organization has also
been lobbying legislators.

CARTOONS
Continued from page 1
"Where do you stop?"
LSA freshman Alex Jacobson said it's
justified to run the cartoons.
"I have a problem with anything that
goes against free speech," he said.
Turkish studies Prof. Gottfried Hagen
said the underlying cause of the animosity
over the cartoons was that Islamic people
believed the images published ridiculed
the image of Muhammad.
But he'said there was probably more to
the story.
"If that was the only issue, we should
see outbreaks all over the Islamic world,"
Hagen said.
He said political and historical factors
complicate the issue in certain parts of the
Islamic world such as Lebanon, Iran and
Afghanistan.
The Middle Eastern perception of
exploitation, colonialism and constant
humiliation of the Islamic world by the
West makes it easy for people in the Mus-
lim community to say that the cartoons are
"another attack of the West against Islam,"
he said.
Education is important to help relieve
tension between the groups, Hagen said.
"Very generally, respect for others' reli-
gious sentiments is always a good thing,"
he said.

More than 10 U.S. newspapers have run
at least some of the cartoons.
The Daily Illini, the campus newspaper
of the University of Illinois at Urbana-
Champaign, ran six of the 12 images in its
Feb. 9 issue.
Daily Illini editor in chief Acton Go-
ton said he made the decision to run the
cartoons alongside an editorial column
because even though students knew about
the controversy surrounding the cartoons,
they did not understand why it was hap-
pening.
"If the intent is to inform the public
and to present uncensored information for
people to make intelligent decisions for
themselves, I agree with (publishing the
cartoons)," he said. "If the intent is mali-
cious and to spread hateful speech, then I
disagree with it."
Gorton added that the initial response
to the paper's publishing the cartoons was
viewed as "another example of Islamd-
phobia," but overall the reaction has been
positive because the issue has sparked a
thoughtful dialogue on campus.
Gorton said that he believes newspapers
that have chosen not to publish the car-
toons are practicing cowardly journalism.
"If you're going to be sensitive about
one area, you have to be sensitive of all
areas," he said. "And if you do that, you
never inform the public on real issues."
The Michigan Daily has not published
the cartoons.

MSA
Continued from page 1
LSA junior Jamie Ruth, who is
vice chair of the College D'emo-
crats, said he learned a lot at the
forum and that the format was
well-done.
"I'm pleased that it was less rhe-
torical than it could have been," Ruth
said.
"Everyone on the panel came
to it in an evenhanded manner.
They were willing to accept that
the other side had credible argu-
ments."

LAWSUIT
Continued from page 1
tower of the Michigan Union in 2000, they found
Native American artifacts, but Michigamua
members said the artifacts had been in storage
since 1989.
Bell and his co-plaintiff, an anonymous University
employee only identified as John Doe, claim to have
heard "pseudo-Native American singing and drum-
ming coming out of the top floors of the tower of the
Michigan Union," according the lawsuit.
Bell wrote that he heard it "sometime between
September 1, 1993 and December 20, 1994," several
years after the society's agreement to cease using
Native American cultural elements.

In his complaint, Bell wrote that the existence of
Michigamua created an offensive and unfriendly
environment for Native Americans to work or study
in, and the University must be held responsible for
sponsoring a group that did so.
"The University breached the contract by failing to
monitor that Michigamua abide by the contract and not
abide in the prohibited behaviors," the lawsuit says.
Bell said he filed the suit on behalf of Native Amer-
ican students, staff and faculty who attended the Uni-
versity between Nov. 1, 1989 and Feb. 6, 2000.
He is requesting a trial by jury to determine wheth-
er the University broke the contract and is seeking
financial compensation for those allegedly discrimi-
nated against by Michigamua's presence on campus.
Bell did not return phone calls asking for
comment.

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The job requires attention to detail, ability to
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DANCE INSTRUCTORS- BALLET, Jazz,
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INDIVIDUALS NEEDED FOR RE-
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For Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2006
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
This is an exciting day. All sorts of
goodies, gifts and favors might suddenly
cdme to you in a quite unexpected man-
ner. Be gracious and say "thank you."
(You deserve these.)
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
Marvelous opportunities to travel or
promote your good name in publishing
and the media, or to further your studies
or training in some way, are possible
today. Be ready for anything!
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
Many of you will discover or learn
about unexpected job opportunities or
ways to improve your career today.
Don't be afraid to grab them! You have
to act fast, because this window of
opportunity is brief.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
You're full of bright, exciting ideas.
Other cultures and different peoples
intrigue you today. New love can deepen
now.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Unexpected gifts or resources are now
available to you. What a stroke of luck!
Quite likely, this favors your job, or pos-
sibly your home.
VIRGO

for your home or a family member.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
Today is full of unexpected little sur-
prises. Your positive, upbeat nature
encourages good things to come your
way. (When you expect the best, you
often get it!)
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Purchases for your home will please
you today. Quite likely, something very
high-tech, scientific or unexpected will
be introduced to your family or where
you live.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
You feel friendly toward everyone you
meet today. Not only that, but others are
friendly to you as well. This excites you
and makes you glad to be alive!
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
New moneymaking ideas definitely
occur to you today. Unexpected job
opportunities and sudden purchases are
exciting. You see new ways of handling
and using what you own.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Expect to meet someone new and dif-
ferent today. This person could be a real
character. He or she might introduce you
to a group or an entirely new way of
thinking that you find liberating!
YOU BORN TODAY You have a

PrI

..
s a
ire' .

SUMMER COUNSELORS WANTED
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l6I1I~iII~IiIU I

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