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February 08, 2006 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-02-08

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, February 8, 2006 - 7

*AT scholarship, said the
not only academic
Continued from page 1 understanding of E
education.
But don't let his passion for modern Hayward said Cr
algebra fool you - Crissman is not a an academic enviro
stereotypical math geek. He is a member the University's.
of a snowboarding club at the University, "It is important t
an editor at the Every Three Weekly and independent way of
an avid scholar of five foreign languages: an open mind to th
Russian, Finnish, Italian, French and experience," Hayw
ancient Greek. come here and mak
Crissman said he is looking forward U.S. about things'
to learning about another culture and you immerse yours
taking more specialized math classes. learn a lot more tha
University alum Christopher Hay- When his year
ward, who is currently studying math- Crissman intends t
ematics at Cambridge on a Churchill in mathematics an
MSA
Continued from page 1.
than $1,000. It will communicate with event planners and
then report back to the assembly.
MSA must now clear any changes to the previously
approved budget through a new resolution in the assem-
bly.
MSA members emphasized that the committee is not
meant to carry out witch hunts.
"The resolution was not written to be about punish-
ment. It's about communication," Fox said.
Previously, the process by which MSA monitored
spending on its own events was "hazy," Fox said. The
treasurer and MSA administrative assistant were respon-
sible for collecting receipts, but not necessarily compar-
ing them to the original resolution.
"This will be an additional arm for the treasurer," Fox
said.

e experience provides
benefits, but a better
European politics and
issman should expect
onment different from
o be ready for a more
f learning and to have
ings you are going to
ard said. "It is easy to
ke comparisons to the
you don't like, but if
elf in the culture, you
n just mathematics."
at Cambridge ends,
o pursue a doctorate
d eventually establish

a career as a university professor.
"My real interest is doing research
in something related to modern alge-
bra," he said. " I think a lot of people
are surprised that you can do research
in math, but that's what most math
professors do."
The scholarship, established in honor
of the former British prime minister,
annually offers 75 colleges nationwide
the opportunity to nominate two stu-
dents for consideration by the founda-
tion. Other participating, institutions
include Boston College, the University of
Chicago and Michigan State University.
Selected students pursue graduate
study in the fields of engineering, science
and mathematics.

WI RELESS
Continued from page 1
"The wi-fi system fights with one sys-
tem in the library - that got nasty fixing
that," Frost said. "If I move to a new space
I have to re-authenticate, and it's just abso-
lutely annoying."
Andrew Palms, director of informa-
tion technology, claims collisions between
wireless networks has only been a minor
problem. He said the networks of differ-
ent schools rarely interfere with each other
because of the distances between them.
However, Palms acknowledged that there
are authentication problems with the wire-
less networks.
"Right now an LSA student cannot walk
into a Law School building (to access the
wireless network) because the Law School
has not chosen to provide access to LSA
and other students," he said.
It's up to the deans of the different
schools to decide if a central authentica-
tion system is necessary to help remedy
COM PLAINT
Continued from page 1
Anderson said the University's
response was inadequate and that Cole-
man only responded to his concerns after
he had taken his complaints to the press.
Peterson defended the University's
commitment to students' concerns.
"When such concerns are brought to
our attention, we take them very seri-

the problem, Palms said.
Although some of the problems between
the networks have been fixed, Frost said
the University needs a central initiative.
He anticipates that when the schools
confront other problems facing their
wireless networks, each school will be
left to fix the issue on their own, giv-
ing way to more problems of coherence.
Decentralization
According to Intel, the second most
wireless campus in the country is West-
ern Michigan University in Kalamazoo.
Now touting 100-percent wireless Inter-
net coverage over the campus, WMU
began installing its wireless network in
2001, and within a year it was up and run-
ning.
About three times smaller than the
University of Michigan, WMU imple-
mented its $1.2-million wireless network
through a central initiative.
Without that centralized process, it
would have been much harder to orches-
trate this, said George Kohrman, assistant
ously," she said. "We conduct an inves-
tigation and we take fair, thorough and
decisive action to try to resolve any
problems. Our goal is to ensure that all
our students can be successful in their
academic careers at Michigan."
The coalition also sent copies of its
complaint to the Council of Higher Educa-
tion, civil rights leaders Rev. Jesse Jackson
and Rev. Al Sharpton, and the American
Civil Liberties Union, among others.
The University's number of black

director of WMU's network operations.
"I think it was a smart thing to do," he
said. "If we would not have done it cen-
trally, we would have staff and faculty
installing their own units."
While it was more expensive to install
the networks through a central initiative,
Kohrman said all the school's wireless
systems were on the same page. Gearing
up the entire school with wireless was
streamlined, and the university avoided
technical gaps in bridging the wireless
networks of different schools, he said.
Schools did not have to outfit their build-
ings with expensive land line jacks. Now
the school enjoys wireless in all class-
rooms and even in 30 outdoor areas.
University of Michigan IT administra-
tors say their decentralized approach has
still produced a strong wireless network
covering most of the campus.
McPherson, former director of LSA's
information technology, disagrees.
"If (installing wireless networks)
were a priority, doing it centrally would
be much more efficient," he said.
doctoral graduates consistently ranks in
the top 10 in the nation. In 2003-2004, it
ranked seventh.
In 2004-2005, 725 students earned
doctoral degrees, of which 33, or 4 per-
cent, were black.
Black students comprise 7.6 percent
of the University's student body overall
and 7.7 percent of graduate students.
The OCR receives about 5,000 com-
plaints annually, but not all are discrimi-
nation-based, Thomas said.

Fox said the resolution was not a direct response to
losses from the Ludacris concert, but the concert was "a
very good indicator of a problem."
"We were told that the worst case was a loss of $5,000,
but we lost $20,000," Fox said, calling it a case of "mis-
communication."
Fox said she first learned of the Ludacris losses from
The Michigan Daily, not from anyone in the assembly.
Miscommunication is exactly what the new committee
is intended to prevent, MSA President Jesse Levine said.
Levine said the Ludacris concert "wasn't perfect" and
that "more communication would have made the event
better."
Michigan Progressive Party founder Walter Nowinski,
who has criticized the dominant Students 4 Michigan
Party for its handling of the Ludacris event, supported
the resolution.
"It's a way of simultaneously having the same stan-
dards for MSA as for other student groups," he said.

the michigan daily

_- T 1

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YOUR MOM WANTS you to live with U of
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WRITING TUTOR/EDITOR, RETIRED
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DANCE INSTRUCTORS- BALLET, Jazz,
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INDIVIDUALS NEEDED FOR RE-
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The U-M Kellogg Eye Center is currently
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J

For Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2006
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
In the next few months, you'll want to
be alone to study or be quiet. It's OK to
withdraw from others. You need privacy
to do your work properly.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
You're entering a 10-week period of
increased activity. Get ready for
increased reading and writing, studying
and short trips. Conversations with oth-
ers become fascinating to you.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
In the next two months, conversations
with bosses, parents and VIPs are
increasingly important. These months
are also a good time to make long-range
plans for the future.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
Because your interest in the world
around you is increasing, travel and
study are excellent choices for you in the
next few months ahead. Any new and
interesting phenomenon will appeal to
you. You'll be curious about everything!
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
In the next 10 weeks, negotiations
about shared property will take place. Be
clear about what you own and what your
obligations are.
VIRGO

cerns. You'll have high expectations for
yourself. Nothing will be too much trou-
ble; you'll pay attention to details!
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
All creative activities are blessed in
the next 10 weeks. Expect to read, write,
draw and explore the performing arts.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
As Mercury hovers at the bottom of
your chart for the next 10 weeks, family
discussions help you learn something
new about your past. You can use this.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
The next two months are active! It's
not a good time to settle down and relax.
Group discussions, short trips and intel-
lectual activities will appeal to you now.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) '
Today Mercury moves into Pisces,
signifying that you should delve into
your financial affairs with greater inter-
est. Expect to be shopping more than
usual in the next 10 weeks as well.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Today Mercury enters your sign,
where it will stay for 10 weeks. (This is
rare.) Expect to be talkative, extra-curi-
ous and active! Your busy mind will
jump from topic to topic.
YOU BORN TODAY You're very
psychic and intuitive. Nevertheless, you

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