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February 06, 2006 - Image 2

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2A - The Michigan Daily - Monday, February 6, 2006

NATION/WORLD

U. N. council
split on Iran

China and Russia
deadlocked with U.S.,
France and Britain
UNITED NATIONS (AP) - Now
that the U.N. atomic watchdog agen-
cy has agreed to report Iran to the
Security Council, diplomats have
vastly different notions about how
the body should be involved in nego-
tiations to make sure Iran is not try-
ing to develop a nuclear weapon.
The five permanent council mem-
bers are split, with the United States,
Britain and France hoping to pres-
sure Iran into backing down with the
ultimate threat of sanctions.
However, China and Russia do
not want to incite Tehran and would
prefer that the council play a limit-
ed role. The Iranian allies want the
International Atomic Energy Agen-
cy to keep the lead in handling Iran.
The Iranian government yesterday
ended all voluntary cooperation with
the IAEA, saying it would start ura-
nium enrichment and reject surprise
inspections of its facilities. Ura-
nium enriched to a low degree can
be used for nuclear reactors, while
highly enriched uranium is suitable
for warheads.
However, in an apparent reversal,
Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid
Reza Asefi said the government was
open to negotiations on Moscow's
proposal that Iran shift its plan for
large-scale enrichment to Russian
territory in an effort to allay suspi-
cions. A day earlier, an Iran repre-

sentative at the IAEA meeting said
that proposal was "dead."
For the U.S.-led faction, the
IAEA's decision Saturday to report
Iran represented a great success.
U.S. Ambassador John Bolton had
pushed for Iran to be brought before
the council since his days as U.S.
undersecretary of state for arms
control and international security in
2001-2005.
"It inevitably changes the politi-
cal dynamic when their nuclear
weapons program has been consid-
ered in the Security Council, which
is charged with the maintenance of
international peace and security by
the U.N. charter, rather than in a
specific agency of the U.N. system,"
Bolton said Friday.
"The Iranians know full well what
they're doing, which is trying to
acquire a nuclear weapons capabil-
ity, and I understand why they don't
want people talking about it in the
full light of day."
In recent days, the diplomatic
debate at the United Nations on
the issue has focused on two words
- "reporting" Iran to the council or
"referring" it.
The distinction reflects a funda-
mental difference in view. The Rus-
sians and Chinese do not mind if the
council is informed of the IAEA's
dealings with Iran, but they do not
want the IAEA to "refer" Iran to the
council. That, they believe, would
give the impression that the IAEA
was washing its hands of Iran and
asking the council to take the lead.

t6
NEWS IN BRIEF
HEADLINES FROM AROUND THE WORLD
BEIRUT, Lebanon
Angry mobs protest political cartoons
Muslim rage over caricatures of the prophet Muhammad grew increasingly violent
yesterday as thousands of rampaging protesters - undaunted by tear gas and water
cannons - torched the Danish mission and ransacked a Christian neighborhood. At
least one person reportedly died and about 200 were detained, officials said.
Muslim clerics denounced the violence, with some wading into the mobs trying
to stop them. Copenhagen ordered Danes to leave the country or stay indoors in the
second day of attacks on its diplomatic outposts in the Middle East.
In Beirut, a day after violent protests in neighboring Syria, the thousands-
strong crowd broke through a cordon of troops and police that had encircled the
embassy. Security forces fired tear gas and loosed their weapons into the air to
stop the onslaught.
The protesters, armed with stones and sticks, seized fire engines, overturned police
vehicles and garbage containers for use as barricades, damaged cars and threw stones
at a Maronite Catholic church in the wealthy Ashrafieh area - a Christian neighbor-
hood where the Danish Embassy is located.
GASVILLE, Ark.
Hate crime suspect killed in police shootout 6

_P PHOTO
Iranian Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki speaks with media yester-
day during a press conference in Tehran, Iran.

"We and China can accept inform-
ing of the Security Council, which is
quite normal," Russia's U.N. Ambas-
sador Andrey Denisov said. "That is
the right of the Security Council to
get any information it needs. But not
referral, not official submitting, not
handing it to the Security Council."
The debate is so important in
part because the Security Council
is unique among U.N. institutions
as the lone body with the power to
impose sanctions or other punitive
measures, deploy peacekeeping mis-
sions, and grant or deny legitimacy
to military action.
And though its resolutions some-
times go ignored or unheeded, there
is also a symbolic shaming that goes
along with bringing a country before

a body whose mandate is to maintain
international peace and security.
In Iran's case, the council's options
include issuing a public statement
without imposing any action or adopt-
ing a resolution demanding Iran stop
its activities and threatening punish-
ment if it does not. The punishment
could include an oil embargo, asset
freeze and travel ban.
Standing in the way of any such
action is China, which has been
blunt about its distaste for punitive
measures.
"I think, as a matter of principle,
China never supports sanctions as a
way of exercising pressure because
it is always the people that would
be hurt," China's U.N. Ambassador
Wang Guangya said.
Bush
budget
favors
defense

The teenager suspected in a hatchet and gun attack inside a New England gay bar
and in the killing of a policeman died yesterday after being wounded in a shootout
with Arkansas officers. Authorities believe he also killed a female acquaintance he
had picked up while driving through West Virginia.
Jacob Robida,18, died at Cox-South Hospital in Springfield, Mo., hospital spokes-
man Randy Berger said.
Investigators said the high school dropout from New Bedford, Mass., had dabbled
in Nazism, and police there said the attack that injured three men, one critically, at
the Puzzles Lounge on Thursday was a hate crime.
New Bedford police said yesterday they were still trying to determine
what motivated Robida and if he had any help.
WASHINGTON
Specter critcizes rationale for spying
Attorney General Alberto Gonzales has not adequately justified why the
Bush administration failed to seek court approval for domestic surveil-
lance, said the senator in charge of a hearing today on the program.
Sen. Arlen Specter said yesterday he believes that President Bush violat-
ed a 1978 law specifically calling for a secret court to consider and approve
such monitoring. The Pennsylvania Republican branded Gonzales' expla-
nations to date as "strained and unrealistic."
The top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, Vermont Sen.
Patrick Leahy, predicted that the committee would have to subpoena the
administration to obtain internal documents that lay out the legal basis for
the program. Justice Department officials have declined, citing in part the confi-
dential nature of legal communications.
SAFAGA, Egypt
Ferry passengers' families blame government
Family members of passengers on a ferry that sank in the Red Sea protested
yesterday as they waited in vain for news of their loved ones, accusing Egypt's
government of mishandling the rescue after the ship went down with more than
1,400 people on board.
Only a handful more passengers were pulled from the sea, dashing hopes for some
800 people missing and feared dead.
Egyptian officials said the captain was missing, and some survivors alleged he had
jumped into one of the first lifeboats out rather than stay with the crippled ferry. A law-
maker said ships operated by the same company had been involved in past tragedies.

6

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- Compiled from Daily wire reports

Proposal will increase CORRECTIONS
military spending but M A story in Friday's Daily
scale back health care called John Rich's wife Joar

(Classic TV director attributes success to 'U') incorrectly
m Rich. Her name is Pat.
n the Daily to corrections@michigandaily.com.

Please report any error i

WASHINGTON (AP) - President
Bush's 2007 budget proposes spend-
ing more than $2.7 trillion, showering
big increases on defense and home-
land security and a smattering of other
favored programs such as scientific
research, education and energy.
At the same time, Bush's blueprint
being submitted to Congress today
proposes shrinking or eliminating
141 programs while achieving $36
billion in Medicare savings over the
next five years.
The plan for the budget year that
begins Oct. 1 lays out a path to achiev-
ing two of the president's chief domestic
goals: making permanent his first-term
tax cuts, which are set to expire after
2010, and cutting the deficit in half by
2009, the year Bush will leave office.
Details about the plan come from
public statements, such as Bush's State
of the Union address last week, and
interviews with officials familiar with
the budget proposal who spoke on con-
dition of anonymity because they did
not want to pre-empt the president's
announcement today.
The budget's arrival on Capitol
Hill will set off months of intense
debate, made even more conten-
tious by congressional elections in
November in which Democrats want
to wrest congressional control from
the Republicans.
While Congress is expected to reshape
Bush's proposals significantly, Repub-
licans voiced support for the blueprint's
objectives.
"The American people know that our
government's too big and it spends too
much. And they expect Congress to do
something about it," newly elected House
Majority Leader John Boehner, R-Ohio,
said on NBC's "Meet the Press."
Senate Budget Committee Chair-
man Judd Gregg, R-N.H., said that
the administration's proposal to trim
Medicare was a "toe in the water" in the
effort to get the soaring costs of benefit
programs like Social Security and Medi-
care under control before 78 million baby
boomers begin to retire.
"The big issue is entitlement reform
and the fact that they are proceeding in
that direction is a good thing to hear" he
said.
Democrats sought to portray Bush's

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