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February 01, 2006 - Image 7

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, February 1, 2006 - 7

BUSH
Continued from page 1
council that sought more White House support
for federal research and development funding at
higher education institutions.
Each year the University receives more than $17
million in grants from the Department of Energy,
representing 23 percent of total research funding
at the University. Bush will likely include the pro-
posal in the 2007 federal budget next week..
During the 51-minute speech, Bush split his
remarks evenly between foreign policy and
domestic issues.
Calling this one of the most "consequential peri-
ods in history," Bush offered a vision for winning
the war in Iraq and used clear, decisive language
aimed at Iran.
"We are on the offensive in Iraq with a clear
plan for victory,' he said.
Bush framed his Iraq strategy with a three-
pronged approach designed to build an inclusive
government, reconstruct the economy and train
Iraqi troops.
"There is a difference between responsible
criticism that aims for success and defeatism that
refuses to acknowledge anything but failure," he
said. "Hindsight alone is not wisdom and second-
guessing is not a strategy"
Bush also chastised what he described as a
small clique of Islamic radicals holding the peo-
ple of Iran hostage. The president demanded that

the regime abandon its nuclear ambitions, dis-
continue its support of terrorists and work toward
democratic freedom.
On the domestic front, the president revealed
a broad range of modest policy initiatives,
including a bipartisan commission to study the
rising costs of Social Security, Medicare and
Medicaid; a plan to make temporary tax cuts
permanent; and a ban on human cloning.
"He laid out a very good plan for the country
and showed a tremendous amount of direction;'
College Republicans chair John Kelly said.
Kelly characterized the initiatives as con-
crete steps in the right direction.
Gov. Tim Kaine (D-Va.), who responded on
behalf of the Democrats after the speech, repeat-
ed the phrase "there is a better way" numerous
times while challenging the President's leader-
ship on a broad spectrum of political issues.
"Our federal government should serve the
American people, but that mission is frustrated
by this administration's poor choices and bad
management," Kaine said. "Families in the Gulf
Coast see that as they wait to rebuild their lives."
Political Science Prof. Lawrence Greene ques-
tioned Bush's motives.
"He has never shown any interest in those
initiatives before. This is an election year and he
does not want to be a lame duck" Greene said.
Jamie Ruth, vice-chair of the College Demo-
crats, liked some of the domestic proposals, such
as reducing dependency on foreign oil, but doubt-
ed Bush's sincerity.

"The words are good, but I don't know if he
can put the money where his mouth is," Ruth
said.
Many pundits billed this speech as a crossroads
for Bush, arguing he needed a strong performance
to reverse growing public disapproval. If he is
unsuccessful, commentators said, he will have a
difficult time passing his proposed legislation.
Bush began the year with an approval rating
of 52 percent and ended the year at 41 percent,
according to FOX News/Opinion Dynamics poll
data. He is scheduled to travel to Minnesota, New
Mexico, Tennessee and Texas this week to rally
support for his newly minted proposals.
In a relatively light moment during the address,
Bush made reference to his age as he transitioned
from foreign policy to health care reform.
"This year the first of about 78 million baby
boomers turn 60, including two of my dad's
favorite people: Me and President Clinton."
Sen. Hilary Clinton (D-NY.) managed an
ambivalent - if not cold - grin after the com-
ment. About a minute later, Bush was abruptly cut
off by a thunderous applause from the Democratic
side of the aisle when he said that Congress did
not enact his Social Security proposal last year.
Clinton's awkward grin was quickly replaced with
a laugh and a smile. Bush waited about 15 seconds
before the Democrats suspended their outburst
amid a chorus of presumably Republican boos.
- Joelle Dodge and Donn M.
Fresard contributed to this report

OSCARS
Continued from page 1
formance in the international thriller "Syriana."
Joining Ledger in the Best Actor category was a
trio of acclaimed portrayals of mid-24th century
American icons: Joaquin Phoenix as Johnny Cash in
"Walk the Line," Phillip Seymour Hoffman as author
Truman Capote in "Capote" and David Strathairn
as newsman Edward Murrow in "Good Night, and
Good Luck." Breakout star Terrance Howard also
earned a nomination for the up-and-coming rapper
tale "Hustle & Flow" a sleeper hit last summer.
Reese Witherspoon earned her first career nomi-
nation for her turn as June Carter-Cash in "Walk
the Line," along with 20-year-old British actress
Keira Knightely, who received her first nod for the
more youth-oriented take on Jane Austen's "Pride &
Prejudice" Perennial favorites also shone through,
with former winners Charlize Theron ("Monster")
and Judi Dench ("Shakespeare in Love") earning
nods for their acclaimed performances in the miner
drama "North Country" and the little-seen "Mrs.
Henderson Presents"
Following her Golden Globe win for Best Actress
in a Motion Picture Drama, Felicity Huffman, star

of ABC's "Desperate Housewives," also made the
cut for her performance as a transsexual reconnect-
ing with the son she fathered in "Transamerica."
On the female end of the supporting categories,
Amy Adams earned a nod for Phil Morrison's
"Junebug," despite the film's inopportune late-
summer release and limited distribution. Rachel
Weisz also earned a nod for her turn as a doomed
young activist in "The Constant Gardener," while
former "Fargo" winner Frances McDormand
joined her for her work in "North Country." As
expected, one-time "Dawson's Creek" star Wil-
liams was also nominated for portrayal of a young
wife thrown into emotional tumult in "Brokeback
Mountain."
Matt Dillon led the supporting actor nods for his
standout turn among more than 20 notable perfor-
mances in the ensemble drama "Crash:" His was
the film's only acting nomination. Paul Giamatti
overcame last year's "Sideways" with a nod for his
role in "Cinderella Man." William Hurt also earned
a surprise nomination for his brief but central per-
formance in "A History of Violence," while Clooney
continued his streak with a nod for "Syriana. Mean-
while, Gyllenhaal stepped out of costar Ledger's
shadow with recognition for his work in "Brokeback
Mountain."

DRUCHNIAK
Continued from page 1
that Druchniak had died, the class was shocked.

"There was a gasp in the class," Chen said.
For normal counseling services, CAPS can be
reached at 764-8312 and is located in room 1310 of
the Michigan Union. The hospital's psychiatric
emergency hotline is 996-4747.

the michigan daily

i

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For Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2006
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
You feel very hopeful and idealistic
about your future dreams. There's some-
thing quite special you want to achieve.
It's something dear to your heart, and
could involve a friend or a group.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
You might approach a parent, boss or
authority figure to lobby on behalf of
someone else today, especially at work.
You want to help the underdog.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
Someone could accuse you of
indulging in escapist fantasies today.
However, we all have to dream, don't
we? It's OK to have something to aim
for.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
You're willing to put the needs of oth-
ers before your own. You feel quite self-
less today when you consider the over-
whelming conditions that others are fac-
ing.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
You're confused about a partnership
or close relationship. Caution: You want
to idolize someone and look at him or
her with rose-colored glasses.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Your ability to use yourimagination

SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
You want to avoid difficult discus-
sions or confrontations with family
members today. That's OK, but do not be
dishonest in order to get around any-
thing. Just say nothing.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
You can't help daydreaming today.
Your mind keeps drifting off to possible
future conquests and exploits. Relax. It's
just that kind of day.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Be careful with your money today.
There could be some confusion. You
might get the wrong change, you might
lose money, someone could be dishonest
with you, or you might be way too
extravagant.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
This is not a good day for you to make
important decisions. Mercury and
Neptune are lined up in your sign. This is
like having Vaseline on your lens.
Things look wonderful, but are they?
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
It's easy to kid yourself today. This
kidding could go either way: You might
think things are better than they are, or
you might think things are worse. Wait a
day to find out.
YOU BORN TODAY You're clever
and mentally quick. You have a fine

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