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January 30, 2006 - Image 7

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Monday, January 30, 2006 - 7A

ASSAULT
Continued from page 1A
Chalmers knew something was fishy
when the man told her the urinator
was someone she knew. She followed
her suspicions and emptied the cash
locker of 90 percent of the bills and
locked the money in an office.
After an uneasy 15 minutes of
standing near the change box, the
visibly intoxicated man made a dash
for the remaining cash.
"He grabbed a fistful of bills,"
said Edward Decker, RC senior and
cashier for the event. The man also
took the cash box.
Decker and fellow cashier Andy
Linn, an RC senior, immediately
pushed the offender against a wall
and exchanged strong words.
Decker wrestled the cash box from
the thief. Flailing, the thief managed
to remove himself from the grip of
Decker and Linn and ran toward the
exit.
_ Seeing the bandit stuff his hand

into his back pocket, an LSA junior
who wished not to be named for
fear of retribution rushed over and
grabbed the thief by the arm. The
man wrestled his arm free. But the
junior again caught him, this time by
the shirt.
"As I was trying to get the money,
he kind of sucker-punched me just
above the left eye," the junior said.
Punching himself free of the junior,
the man made his way outside.
LSA senior Dave Armitage said
three or four police cars then sur-
rounded the fleeing thief.
Visibly agitated, the suspect started
yelling and swearing at the police.
"I don't want to fight," he said
when police pushed him against a car
and handcuffed him.
He didn't stop fighting.
"He started going nuts in the back
of the car and banging around,"
Armitage said.
Officers transported the suspect
to the Washtenaw County Jail. All of
the money was eventually returned.

WOODRUFF
Continued from page 1A
explosive device, and he wasn't injured, ABC said.
"Wars are not fought on the training ground, nor can they
be covered from a TV studio," CBS News anchor Bob Schief-
fer said Sunday, setting aside his weekly "Face the Nation"
commentary for a report on the incident. "They are not real-
ity shows, they are reality. Young men and women have to
fight them, and correspondents have to cover them if we are to
understand what they are about."
Woodruff took over as "World News Tonight" co-
anchor with Elizabeth Vargas this month, replacing the
late Peter Jennings.
Westin has said he wants two people on the job, in
part because one of the anchors will usually be on the
road covering stories while the other is studio-bound.
In just four weeks, Woodruff has been to Iran, Iraq,
Israel twice and California to interview the found-
ers of Google. Technology makes it easier to anchor
a broadcast from remote sites than it was even a few
years ago.
CNN is also quick to send anchor Anderson Cooper to
the scene of stories.
"I seem to see journalists getting more and more involved
in dangerous situations, from Anderson Cooper and Al
Roker getting blown down in Katrina, to a young journal-
ist from the Christian Science Monitor being held hostage,
to a main network anchor getting seriously injured," said
Jeff Alan, news director at KOIN-TV in Portland, Ore.,
and author of "Anchoring America: The Changing Face of
Network News." "When do news managers making these
assignments say'enough is enough'?"
But any responsible journalist who wants to report on
what is going on somewhere needs to be there, said CBS
News correspondent Lara Logan, who was blown 12 feet
in the air but escaped with minor injuries when a military
convoy she was traveling with in Afghanistan was attacked
in 2003.
"If you really want to cover the story, if you believe in what
you're doing, you have absolutely no choice," Logan told The
Associated Press. "If you want to be safe, don't go to Iraq."

SMOKING
Continued from page 1A
"We can't tell DPS what to do," said task force
member Luay Almassalha, a representative from
West Quadrangle.
Resolution author Tim Bekkers, a representative
from South Quadrangle, said he talked with DPS
officials and was told that officers can only enforce
rules on University property.
If the 25-foot perimeter extends to city property,
he said, DPS could not enforce the rule.
Almassalha said students are more supportive of
the proposed ban this year.
"There are so many sides to this issue," Almas-
salha said. "RHA wants to represent constituents
as broadly as possible."
There is some confusion over how the resolu-

tion will affect residence halls with courtyards,
Williams said. She said it could be a safety issue
if smokers have to lump together in the center of
a courtyard.
The resolution would not only affect students,
but also faculty, staff and visitors.
Bekkers also talked with smokers before writing
the resolution. He said there was a consensus that
limitations on smoking are acceptable.
"We all have rights and our rights go as far as
we can until they infringe on others," said Bekkers,
who said he smokes occasionally.
RC freshman Rob Linn disagreed.
"It's a little too far," said Linn, smoking a cigarette
outside East Quadrangle. "This resolution sucks."
A bill introduced in the state House and the
Senate last April would ban smoking in all public
buildings.

MOFFETT
Continued from page 1A
issue with.
The state chapter did not respond
to phone calls asking for comment.
In the letter, she said she has never
been one to "settle for garbage that is
handed down to (her) ... and to walk
around, representing an organization
that has done so ... is unbearable."
Moffett and Riana Anderson, pres-
ident of the campus chapter of the

NAACP, both refused to comment.
The state chapter's "actions have
continuously proven to be jealous and
petty," Moffett said.
Moffett also hinted at internal con-
flict within the NAACP: "The fact
that we have yet to inform our mem-
bership about what is going on within
our organization is wrong."
Moffett's presence will be missed,
said LSA sophomore Raheam Shal-
hout, a member of the NAACP.
"Alex Moffett was a great candi-
date," he said. "I voted for her."

SUPER BOWL
Continued from page 1A
one that demands respect.
Even though they advanced to the Super Bowl
as the No. I seed in the NFC, the Seahawks enter
the game as four-point underdogs. Their oppo-
nent, the Pittsburgh Steelers, is a wild card team
that was the AFC's sixth seed.
The Steelers are set to fly into Detroit Metro
Airport on a charter flight at 10 this morning.
Their arrival is closed to the public.
Seahawks quarterback Matt Hasselback said
that when the NFL announced Detroit was the
host, he heard people complain it was going to be
cold and that, together with a number of other of
factors, made the city a poor choice.
Hasselback said he thought differently.
"My immediate reaction was: 'Are you kid-
ding me? It's the Super Bowl,' " Hasselback said.
"Why does that matter what the weather's like?
I've actually been to Detroit a few times before,

and I liked it here."
Mack Strong, the Seahawks' Pro Bowl full-
back, has been with the team for 13 years, more
than any other player. He said that until the
Seahawks' pep rally this morning at Qwest Field,
it never really set in that he was heading to the
Super Bowl.
"This is the most exciting time of my life, pro-
fessionally," Strong said. "That's the only way I
can describe it."
About 15,000 of their now notoriously rabid
fans cheered for the team at the field before they
boarded the plane, Strong said.
Holmgren jokingly described the plane ride
from Seattle to Detroit as "very rough."
Paul Allen, the team's famously rich owner who
made his living by co-founding Microsoft, bought
a plane for the team to use for travel. Holmgren
said he slept most of the way, but added that the
plane is equipped with "all these electronic gad-
gets." All the seats are first-class seats, and the
flight crew was the same they've had all year, mak-
ing the entire trip very comfortable, he said.

the michigan daily

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996-0566 or writeon@htdconnect.com
WRITING TUTOR/EDITOR, RETIRED
UM Prof., published writer. 761-3427.
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AFRAID OF SNAKES or spiders? Volun-
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EARN $4,000! Be an Egg Donor. Must be
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PHARMACOGENETICS AND EYE
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The U-M Kellogg Eye Center is currently
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MACKINAC ISLAND RESORT Hotel and
fine dining restaurant seeking summer staff
for all positions. Go to
www.iroquoishotel.com and fill out an online
application or contact Marti at 906-643-8293
for further info.
NANNY NEEDED FOR 3 mo. old infant in
A2 home. May-Aug. 2006. Approx. 35-40
hrs./wk. Great ref./non-snkr, req. Pref live-
out w/ own trans. but will consider live-in.
jreillylukela@yahoo.com or 604-6303.
SPEND THE SUMMER ON THE LAKE!
Camp Robindel is looking for mature, high
energy, fun loving staff to teach & supervise
children for the summer (June 14-Aug. 13)
on Lake Winnispesaukee in New Hampshire.
We will pay for your transportation, stipend,
room & board. We will be on campus Feb.
5-7. Apply online: www.robindel.com or call
866-265-8577 to set up an interview.
SPEND YOUR SUMMER IN A
LAKEFRONT CABIN IN MAINE.
If you're looking to spend this summer out-
doors, have fun while you work, and make
lifelong friends, then look no further.
Camp Mataponi, a residential girls camp in
Maine, has female/male summertime open-
ings for Land Sports, Waterfront (small
crafts, skiing, life guarding, WSI,boat
drivers), Ropes Course, Tennis, H.B. Riding,
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salaries plus room/board & travel provided.
ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS WILL BE
CONDUCTED 2/14. Callus today toll free
at 1-888-684-2267 or apply online at
www.campmataponi.com
SUMMER COUNSELORS WANTED
Counselors needed for our student travel and
pre-college enrichment programs, middle
school enrichment, and college admissions
prep. Applicants must be 21 years old by
June 20th and possess a valid driver's license.
We need: Mature, Hardworking, Energetic in-
dividuals who can dedicate 4-7 weeks men-
toring and supervising teens. To receive in-
formation or apply please visit
www.summerfun.com or 800-645-6611
WORK ON MACKINAC Island this Season-
The Island House Hotel and Ryba's Fudge
Shops are looking for seasonal help in all ar-
eas: Front Desk, Bellstaff, Waitstaff, and
Sales Clerks. Housing available, bonus, and
discounted meals. Call Ryan at
1(800)626-6304 www.theislandhouse.com

SPRING BREAK 2006
Travel with Experts, Sun Splash Tours-Since
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UP FOR THE challenge? Free hot sauce and
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AVAIL. NOW: MASTER bed/bath. in lg. 2
bdrm. apt. off Main St. 1 min. from I-94.
wshr./dryer in unit. Weight rm., pool, hot
tub. Rent neg. 734-464-0681.
URGENT! MONGOLIAN STUDENT needs
housing for 6 wks., Feb. 15-Mar. 24. Call
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MONDAY SPECIAL
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"i

^.b~

PICK UP THE PACE!!
Housing for 2006-07 is
running thin. We still
have 1 and 2 bedroom
apartments as well as
efficiencies remaining.
Call to make an
appointment or stop in
and sign a lease today! !

For Monday, Jan. 30, 2006
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
Yesterday's New Moon made you
think about friendships. Today you're
wondering what your true feelings are
for others, and vice versa.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
If you have any sense of destiny for
yourself, what is it? What do you want
others to think or say about you after
you're gone? What qualities do you want
respect for?
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
You feel a need to understand more
about the world, especially cultures and
countries that are different from yours.
After all, we're all in this Big Soup
together.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
Something or someone will make you
think very deeply about your values
today. Never underestimate the impor-
tance of kindness in your daily life.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Deep-rooted feelings you have about
partnerships and close friendships could
surface today. Try to understand these. If
you don't, you're driving in the dark.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)

SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
This is the perfect day to clean up
garbage and unneeded or unwanted
items at home. Clean up laundry areas,
and everything to do with the plumbing
and storage.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Take a moment to scrutinize your feel-
ings for siblings, neighbors and rela-
tives. Don't just gloss over things. These
people are in your life. What are your
feelings for them?
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Make friends with your financial situ-
ation. Don't live in the dark about it.
Find out what you own and what you
owe. Get facts and figures.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
Think about how you can improve
your health by losing weight or cutting
back on some harmful habits. (It's easier
to stop a bad habit than it is to start a
good one.)
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
If you feel vaguely worried about
something, make a worry list. Bring your
fuzzy, doubtful thoughts out into the
open. Then you can deal with them!
YOU BORN TODAY Even if you
think you aren't, you're actually quite

' i71..!!UIGl

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