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January 25, 2006 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-01-25

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, January 25, 2006 - 7

Three campus leaders forced out
of groups due to membership

MICHIGAMUA
Continued from page 1
igamua was made public last December.
Hull is an advocate for the LGBT cam-
pus community and last year was secre-
tary of the Michigan Student Assembly.
"Michigamua has a documented
history of discrimination, sexism,
racism, and cultural appropriation,"
SSAA said in a written statement
to the Daily. "Michigamua has also
been repeatedly deceitful and non-
compliant in both inter-community
dialogues and official University con-
tracts to cease and desist this behav-
ior. Accepting the organization in
any form actively negates a commit-
ment to a safe, respectful campus
community and cannot be tolerated,
especially by organizations touting
themselves as progressive."
Hull said he joined Michigamua in an
effort to bring diversity to an important
campus institution.
"The further you get into the insti-
tution, the more influence you have,"
Hull said in a written response to
SSAA dated Dec. 7. "Michigamua is
not leaving, so why shouldn't we get
involved ... and make this long-stand-
ing organization into what it ought to
be?"
Woll said her Michigamua member-
ship hasn't ruined her friendships.
"There are some that may disagree
with my decision to join but still sup-
port me as a friend and leader on cam-
pus," Woll wrote in a statement to the
Daily. "Anyone who knows me and my
passionate commitment to working for
social justice knows that I would never
be a part of organization that would
betray these principles."
But RC senior Clara Hardie, a friend
of Woll's and a member of the Coke
Coalition, disagreed.

COKE
Continued from page 1
The U.S. government has listed
AUC as a terrorist organization. As
a result, any aid to AUC would be
considered a felony offense. Despite
Collingsworth's efforts to bring this
issue to the attention of the Bush
administration, he said, it has not
pursued any legal action against the
company.
The political situation in Colom-
bia is extremely volatile. Two major
groups, both funded by drug traf-
ficking money, leftist guerillas and
right-wing paramilitaries, compete for
political dominance.
Coca-Cola spokesman Pablo Larga-
cha said the company was not respon-
sible for the actions of the paramilitary
groups and had no involvement in the
murder. Collingsworth said while the
company argues in court that it can't
control the paramilitaries, it simulta-
neously guarantees universities across
the country that it upholds human

rights standards everywhere it does
business.
"Coca-Cola needs to take responsi-
bility for the practices of companies it
chooses to do business with," Colling-
sworth said. "If they asked (the bot-
tlers) to make everyone at the plant
wear pink polka-dot shirts, you better
believe they would do it. Our goal is to
make the company put that power to a
positive use."
The most recent example of conflict
between the company and organized
labor comes from Turkey, where 110
union members were fired.
Kari Bjorhus, a spokeswoman for
the company, said that the workers
were fired for "performance reasons."
In a letter to Ed Potter, director of
Global Labor Relations for Coca-Cola,
Collingsworth questioned the motives
behind the company's actions.
"What an amazing coincidence!"
he wrote. "All of the 110 workers
who joined a union, many of whom
had been with the company for years
and had consistently received positive
evaluations, suddenly had a collective

failure of performance."
Since being fired, the workers
have received two years worth of
back pay, but have not been rehired.
Collingsworth said this is unaccept-
able because it sends the message to
employees that workers who join a
union could be fired.
Collingsworth has a list of seven
demands that are required to resolve
SINALTRAINAL's case against the
company, including a statement pub-
licly denouncing anti-union violence
and a human-rights policy that applies
to all the bottling plants with which
Coke conducts business in Colombia.
Lindsey Rogers, a campaign mem-
ber who helped organize the event,
said she was pleased with the way it
turned out.
"We wanted to address people's
questions about the issue, and provide
more information about the lawsuit
and issues in Colombia," Rogers said.
"I think people got a lot out of it."

MIKE HULSEBUS/Daily
An artist hangs a Michigamua artifact at an exhibit last month that displayed the
racist and divisive past of the society.

- Michael Coulter
contributed to this report

"She's alienated herself from her old
friends and the social activist commu-
nity," Hardie said. "Because she prob-
ably foresaw these consequences, I'm
angry at her choice. But I still feel bad
for her."
The three students' names were
released by University alum Rob Good-
speed on his blog Goodspeedupdate.
com last month.
Goodspeed, who has posted lists of
Michigamua members for years, said
he continues to expose the society's
members because Michigamua's cen-
tury-old relationship with the Uni-
versity makes it a significant piece of
campus history.
Based on Michigamua's history of
using Native American culture as its
own, many campus groups, notably the
Native American Student Association,
continue to oppose it.
Hull said he has e-mailed NASA
in the interest of dialogue, but NASA
hasn't returned his e-mails.
Brittany Marino, NASA's external
co-chair, said Michigamua's existence
would be more acceptable if it changed

its name, which is not from a Native
American tribe but was designed to
sound like one.
"The way they bastardized, mocked
and ridiculed Native American cul-
ture is just wrong," said Casey Kasper,
NASA's internal co-chair.
Marino said the burden lies with
Michigamua to make itself acceptable
in the eyes of NASA.
"The question is, when are Mich-
igamua (members) going to take
responsibility for their history of mar-
ginalizing the Native American com-
munity? " she said.
When asked whether the society is
willing to consider changing its name,
Hull said: "Michigamua is willing to
sit down with members of NASA and
members of the local Native American
community to discuss any and all con-
cerns that they may have with our orga-
nization."
But given the high emotional stakes
involved, dialogue may be difficult.
"The thing I hope for most is just
for them to not exist anymore," Kasper
said.

MSA WALK
Continued from page 1
cemetery is almost always dark," LSA fresh-
man Sarah Kettner said. "I normally try to walk
on the other side of street, but it's still not very
comfortable."
LSA senior Natalie Kaplan said she feels ner-
vous walking through campus at night.
"The Frieze building is scary - it's so out
there," Kaplan said. "Walking from South Uni-
versity to Washtenaw is really dark, too. It's a
prime stretch for a girl to be attacked."
To alleviate this sort of problem, DPS con-
tinues to sponsor S.A.F.E. Walk, a free campus
escort service that provides University students
an alternative to walking alone.
But some students say S.A.F.E. Walk doesn't
always work.
"It's ineffectual," said Business junior Adam
Block. "You have to wait forever."
Early next week, MSA will meet with DPS
Director Bill Bess as well as members of the
City Council and Police Chief Greg O'Dell to
discuss last night's findings.

POLL
Continued from page 1
tory about MSA.
MSA President Jesse Levine vehemently chal-
lenged the accuracy of the results and intent of the
MPP pollsters.
The question that asked if the student could name
the current MSA president - the part of the survey
that received the most scrutiny from Levine - was
intended to gauge whether students have an active
interest in the assembly's proceedings, Nowinski
said.
Nowinski apologized to Levine for any misinter-
pretations, acknowledging that it is not Levine's role
to be a visible figure on campus but rather an effec-
tive manager of the assembly.
Nowinski said the MPP plans to conduct any
research in the future through third parties, adding
that Social Science Prof. David Burkam has offered
to help conduct any future polls.
MSA representatives expressed displeasure over
the methodology of the poll and its conclusions,
but many said the results should serve to motivate
members to work to change the assembly's campus
image.

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ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
You feel a bit restless today. Actually,
you feel independent and rebellious!
Perhaps someone challenges your
beliefs (religious or political). Don't take
the bait.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
Stay on top of your bank account
today. Surprises with other people's
money or the resources of others are pos-
sible. Take caution against losing money.
However, you might also find some!
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
Partners are a bit feisty today. (You
might be too.) This could be because
someone catches you off guard about
something. Basically, it's a minor thing
- let it go.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
Computer failures, power outages, lost
items and surprise news could affect
your workday. You might also learn
something unexpected related to your
health. Relax - it's minor.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Surprise flirtations will please you
today. Parents should be watchful over
children because it is a mildly accident-
prone day. However, you're full of cre-
ative ideas.

impulse. It's OK. Be who you are.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
You want to buy something beautiful
for your home or for a family member
today. (Impulse shopping is irresistible.)
What you buy will probably please you.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
The Moon is still in your sign today,
giving you a slight edge of good fortune.
It makes a gentle aspect to Neptune,
which makes you feel tender-hearted to
others. (That's nice.) Extend a helping
hand if you can.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
You can definitely enjoy some soli-
tude in pleasant surroundings today. You
need time by yourself to sort things out
and pull your act together.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
Discussions with friends, perhaps a
female friend in particular, are rewarding
today. Someone needs to confide in you,
and perhaps vice versa as well.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
People see you in very sympathetic
terms today. Someone might offer to
help you. Alternatively, someone also
might ask you for help. If so, you feel
willing to act.
YOU BORN TODAY You're a fasci-
nating person. You lead an interesting

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