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January 24, 2006 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-01-24

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 24, 2006 - 7

b CENTER
Continued from page 1
Acho said the new center also
serves as a tool to recruit new ath-
letes.
"With all the demands of athlet-
ics, parents want to know how my
kid is going to go to a place like
Michigan - practicing 20 hours a
week and in the training room, and
competing - how are they going
to be able to do that and then also
go to a school as elite as the Uni-
versity of Michigan," Acho said.
But one thing the new Academ-
ic Center isn't is a study hub for
the general student population. At
least not yet.
The center is currently open to
700 student athletes across cam-
pus, but use will be restricted
for other students until after this
semester, Acho said.
Administrators are waiting to
see how much use the building gets

before opening it up to student ath-
letes.
"We'd hate to open up, and then
our (athletes) not have access to
it," Acho said. "That really defeats
the purpose of having an academic
center for athletes."
The idea for an academic cen-
ter isn't new, but it didn't come to
fruition until Bill Martin became
athletic director in 2000.
"It was my first priority," Martin
said. "I just found that all of our
students, regardless of their aca-
demic progress, wanted a center
where they could study with their
fellow athletes, where they could
have their own study halls."
Ross, an alum who donated $100
million to the Business School in
2004, donated a separate $5 mil-
lion to the Academic Center. Fund-
ing for the $12 million structure
also included other donations.
"From my standpoint, Michigan
is a great academic school," Ross

said. "And too many people think
of us as an athletic school - when
you're outside Michigan in the
East. And for what the student ath-
letes sacrifice, and to attract the
best student athletes, they deserve
to have these kinds of facilities."
Martin said he is not concerned
about the increase in the Athletic
Department budget as a result
of the Academic Center, which
is estimated to cost $400,000 in
operations each year, said Jason
Winters, the executive director of
athletic business operations.
"Academic aid is not a budgetary
line item for our coaches," Martin
said. "That's one of the great things
about Michigan. Other schools tier
their sports. (But at Michigan), it's
a part of our culture. It's a part of
who we are."
- Ian Herbert contributed
to this report.

GRANT
Continued from page 1
retention of minority students already
in the "pipeline."
"If we are just looking at minori-
ties who are retained in engineering,
it's only 50 percent," Thompson said.
"If we could increase that retention
to two out of three, we would have a
substantial increase in students that
are graduating."
The average graduation rate for
the rest of the population in the Col-
lege of Engineering as freshmen is
about 75 percent.
All universities in the alliance
already have programs geared to recruit
and retain underrepresented minorities,
through opportunities such as pre-
college and undergraduate research
programs. But the new initiative will
emphasize a stronger collaboration and
idea exchange among the four universi-
ties and will even involve some coop-
eration with community colleges.

Students get taste
of real world

CR IM E men strike the victim with his hand, not
Continued from page 1 a gun, before running away.
When police arrived with their dog,
into a ditch between two houses. The vic- Brutus, they were able to track the scent of
tim said one of the men asked him for $50 the suspects, which led them to a Lutheran
in exchange for help pushing the car out Ministry building on South Forest Street.
of the ditch. When the victim said he had The dog also halted at a few houses on Pros-
no money, the suspect hit him across the pect Street Police inquired at all addresses,
face with the butt of a small black semi- but found no trace of the suspects.
automatic handgun, and forcibly removed Department of Public Safety spokes-
$200 from his breast pocket. woman Diane Brown said students
A student who lives nearby and walking home alone late at night are
observed the incident, told police she advised to call safe-walk, an escort ser-
saw the cab driver give one of the men vice that can be reached at 763-WALK
money, then get out of the car and try (or 763-9255). She also advises stu-
to push it out of the ravine unsuccess- dents to stay alert, walk in groups and
fully. She also said she saw one of the stick to well-lit areas.
the michigan daily

DROP OUTS
Continued from page 1
Fromer, who is an Asian studies
major, said that while the degree
program is strong at both schools,
Tufts offers smaller class sizes and
more contact with professors in
addition to being closer to his home
in Albany, N.Y.
For Allison Boyd, a sophomore at
Georgetown University in Washing-
ton, the huge, sometimes impersonal
nature of Michigan, and its distance
from her home in Rye, N.Y., also
weighed heavily on her decision to
transfer.

"Michigan was so huge, I never
saw the same people twice," Boyd
said.
Both students said that they are
happy with their decision to trans-
fer and feel their current schools
are a better fit for their needs.
As a pre-med student, Boyd said
Georgetown's curriculum is more
practical for her goals.
"I have much more opportuni-
ties to work with faculty members
on really interesting projects (at
Georgetown)," she said. "I didn't
realize how much red tape there
is at Michigan until I came to
Georgetown."

AID
Continued from page 1
"To earn the cost of attendance by
working would require a full-time
job paying at least $10 per hour ... I
don't know how students who do not
get any parental support manage to
do it," Fowler said.
Students such as LSA junior
Kellie Reid find themselves in a
catch-22.
Reid began working in a restau-
rant when she was 15 and gradually
assumed all of her own financial
responsibilities, but is still legally
considered a dependent. Her finan-
cial aid is calculated assuming that
her parents will contribute toward
her education, even though she
agreed to pay her college expenses.
"It's been a struggle to figure out
how to make it work," Reid said.
She has two jobs this semester,
splitting her 40-hour work week
between being a waitress at Gratzi
and working as a clerical assistant
at the Center for Forensic Psychia-
try. She is still taking 14 academic
credits and getting four credits for
an independent study through her
job at CFP.
"I have to be efficient in every-
thing I do," she said.
Because financially independent
students must still report their fami-
lies' financial circumstances, their
financial aid packages vary widely.
For example, Will's mom works a
part-time job and has four kids, two
of which are in college. "My mom
didn't really have the money for (col-
lege tuition) and the FAFSA helps us
out a lot," Wills said.
Their family contribution was cal-
culated to be only $300, and much of
his tuition is covered by grants.
Though he simultaneously holds
two jobs - one work-study - in
addition to 15 credit hours, Wills
shrugs off his decision to pay for
tuition himself.
"It really wasn't that big a deal,"
Wills said.
So far, he has managed to pay
off his loans by working during the
summer.
He also said that his twin brother,
who attends Michigan State Univer-
sity, has more loans to repay even
though they have effectually the
same financial situation.
"I think (the University's finan-
cial aid package) is great," Wills
said. "He doesn't get at all what I'm
getting."
Reid, on the other hand, has a
much less generous aid package.
She has $5,500 in scholarships and
must pay for the remaining $14,500
through loans.
"I'm in a lot of debt," she admits,
because her parent's income is fig-
ured into her financial aid. While
she had a better financial aid offer
from Western Michigan University,
she elected to attend the University
anyway.
"It's an investment," she said. "I
wanted to go somewhere that was
the best."
She has not found many resources
on campus that specifically address
the issues faced by financially inde-
pendent students.
"I know that they're there, but it's
incredibly difficult to take advan-
tage of them," she said.
According to Fowler, there are no
University scholarships or counsel-

"I'm really motivated
to keep my grades up,
because I don't want
to waste my money.
Amy Mason
School of Music freshman

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ing services through the Office of
Financial Aid that specifically aid
financially independent students. But
Fowler added that counselors who
work in the University's financial aid
office will assist a student by com-
pleting the FAFSA upon request.
LSA sophomore Monica Sendor,
a member of the honors college, has
assumed responsibility for her col-
lege payments this semester. She
also had better aid offers from other
universities.
"Private universities have a lot
more endowments to give and loans
to offer," Sendor said. "There was a
noticeable difference in the percent-
age of financial aid."
To make up for the difference, she
works a combined 20 hours a week
between two jobs, one as a campus
tour guide, and another as an office
assistant at the Center for Russian
and Eastern European Studies.
Like Reid, she has found it diffi-
cult to get advice about being finan-
cially independent.
"You have to be responsible for
a lot of things - making sure you
have enough money to pay the bills
on time," Sendor said.
She would like to see a counselor
or adviser who specifically address-
es concerns for students who have to
navigate the financial aid process by
themselves.
While the tuition bills carry a lot
of responsibility, there are merits to
being financially independent.
Amy Mason, a School of Music
freshman who pays her tuition. Her
parents pay for her room and board,
finds the freedom of financial inde-
pendence irreplaceable.
"I'm really motivated to keep my
grades up, because I don't want to
waste my money," she said.
But she pointed out one drawback:
"I have no money."
Mason, a viola performance and
music education major, pays $3,500
by earning money playing her viola
in the Dearborn Symphony Orches-
tra and by playing music gigs in the
Detroit metro area.
Reid said she also finds the same
benefit from her situation.
"There are times I think I wish I
could be one of those students who
rides through college, but I know
how the real world works already,"
she said.
As a trade-off, students who have
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college organizations.
"Ingthe summer, I allow myself
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Nonetheless, Sendor, Reid, Wills,
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sions to pay the University price tag
independently.
"It's never easy, but it's always
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For Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2006
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
This is a lovely day to talk to friends
and groups. You feel philosophical and
particularly interested in political issues.
You're open to what others have to say.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
This is a good day to meet others
halfway in discussions about shared
property. You're in a very reasonable
frame of mind. Fortunately, so are oth-
ers. It's a good day for business.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
Today the Moon is opposite your sign,
making lovely aspects to Mercury and
the Sun. Furthermore, Mercury is your
ruler. This means things flow easily in
the way you want, especially in discus-
sions with partners and friends.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
This is an excellent day to attend to lit-
tle details and get better organized at
home and at work. Just go at an easy
pace. It's a good day to ask for a loan.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
This can be a fun day for you! It's also
a lovely day to enjoy playful activities
with children. Professional sports,
romance, flirtations and creative projects
will go well.
VIRGO

acquaintances and siblings. Run around
and get little errands done. The world is
cooperating!
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
This afternoon is a good day for shop-
ping and for business and commerce (but
not this morning). It's also a good day to
enter into negotiations or sign contracts.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
The Moon is in your sign today. You
feel great! Today the world owes you a
favor. (And you know it's time to col-
lect!)
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Any spare moments of solitude will
please you today. Try to make a little
time just for you today. At least sneak
away for cup of coffee somewhere.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
You can rouse the troops today!
You're very effective talking to friends
and groups or clubs. Others are willing
to follow you now.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Briefly, you will be in the public eye
today. People will notice you. Fear not,
they will see you in positive terms.
You're confident, friendly and capable.
YOU BORN TODAY People admire
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