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January 18, 2006 - Image 7

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, January 18, 2006 - 7

TULANE
Continued from page 1
weeks after arriving on campus.
"My gut was I was going to stay," he said. "I had to make the
decision very quickly."
He was accepted. Of the 65 students, Hines is the only one
who stayed.
He said he chose the University for its sense of community.
The University sent a letter last fall informing the displaced
students who didn't apply to transfer that they had to return to
their previous schools once they reopened.
The letter did not apply to students whose specific programs
had been discontinued because of the hurricane.
Massive damage diverted funds previously earmarked for
those programs to cleanup efforts at schools such as Tulane,
which was forced to cut several degree programs, including
electrical engineering and computer science.
The school also had to drop several varsity sports. Cuts like
these make Hines nervous about the future of Tulane.
Hines said he feels that the lack of money may hurt the
school's tradition of academic excellence.
But Hines is more optimistic than doubtful.
"New Orleans will not be knocked down and not get back
up," he said.

CREDITS
Continued from page 1
registration groups, is one that is need-
ed, but added that he believes reform is
not the answer to student complaints.
"Our biggest problem, regardless of
registration appointments, is supply and
demand of classes," he said.
Robinson said the current credit
bracket system is 15 to 20 years old and
that the 15 credits per bracket model is
not uncommon among colleges.
LSA-SG treasurer Mike Rudy said
that other Big Ten schools have average
credit brackets that are significantly
smaller that the University's. He said the
schools he looked at ranged in size. The
smallest was a one-credit bracket sys-
tem at Michigan State University, and
the largest was a seven-credit bracket
system at the University of Iowa.
Robinson said there is no perfect sys-
tem and that models used by other Big
Ten schools would not necessarily work

at the University.
"We have system constraints as to
how many people can access the sys-
tem at a given time," Robinson said.
"We currently have 100 to 200 people
accessing the system per 15-minute
intervals."
LSA-SG expressed its concerns in
December with a resolution based on
student complaints and research of
other Big Ten schools. LSA-SG Vice
President Paige Butler said the resolu-
tion has been shown to the LSA Dean's
Office and the Academic Affairs Advi-
sory Committee, a committee of faculty
that reports to the provost.
Prof. Robert Krasny, who chairs the
committee, said credit bracket reform
has been a long-standing issue, but his
committee is not the one to make a
decision on the issue.
He said the registrar's office has
many advising committees within orga-
nizations such as the Michigan Admin-
istrative Information Services.
No students are included in the deci-

sion-making process.
"It has become apparent that student
and faculty input is missing," Krasny
said.
He advocates working toward having
student and faculty serve on the advis-
ing committee in order to make sure
projects that are necessary for students
and faculty receive priority.
Along with Robinson, the commit-
tee met with LSA-SG last week to look
over the proposed changes.
LSA-SG President Andrew Yahkind
said the registrar would not provide any
sort of timeline as to when credit brack-
et reform could occur.
"LSA-SG has compromised," he
said. "We don't ask that credit bracket
reform happen right now; all we want is
a timeline for when it can happen."
Yahkind said the registrar told him
that credit bracket reform was on the
bottom of his list of priorities.
"The registrar makes a six-figure sal-
ary to make sure we're at the top of reg-
istration and related things," Yahkind

said. "If the registrar isn't embarrassed,
then I'm embarrassed for him."
Robinson also said he estimates the
task of renovating the credit bracket
system would be of low to medium
complexity, but he said that a lot of
effort would be needed to adapt the new
software.
He added that it is necessary to have
a system that is fair to all students at
the University and that the LSA-SG
proposal only addresses undergraduate
students and not graduate students
Robinson also stressed that MAIS is
currently working on many projects,
such as creating an online graduation
audit form so that students can track
their progress. MAIS recently finished
implementing online web grades across
the University as well as online pay-
ment of University accounts.
Robinson said there might be an
opportunity in the upcoming year to
address credit bracket reform, but it
may not be exactly the same as the
LSA-SG proposal.

the michigan daily

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0

STEM CELLS
Continued from page 1
difficult to do stem cell research in
Michigan, which has some of the
strictest regulations in the country.
"Indiana will let me do it, Califor-
nia will pay me to do it, but Michi-
gan will jail me if I do it," Morrison
said, referring to somatic cell nucle-
ar transfer, a research technique that
exchanges the nuclear material of an
egg cell to produce tissues identical
to and safer for the patient.
At the meeting, State Rep. Andy
Meisner (D-Ferndale) explained
how knee-jerk legislation in response

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EDELSON
Continued from page 1
for very long. We weren't especially close
and hadn't spoken in some time. But Snik
left a lasting impression on everybody he
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I'll never forget those afternoons I
spent standing next to Snik on the pool
deck at Canham Natatorium. The over-
powering stench of chlorine was a wel-
come respite from the cold outside. Snik
would monitor the Wolverines' times as
he talked slowly and casually, the swim-
mers occasionally splashing us at the wall
as they made their turns. It's a scene that
will stay with me forever.
Last night, an event at Canham
celebrated Snik with speeches and a
slideshow. Snik's wife, Kirsten, and two
young children, Austin and Madison,
were on hand. The tremendous turnout

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SCHWARZ
Continued from page 1
congressman who was ... elected last
time, who now has a chance to explain to
constituents why he's taking a stance far
to the left of the majority of his constitu-
ents," Walberg said.
Schwarz won 24 percent of the 2004
primary vote, running against five chal-
lengers, including Walberg, who received
18 percent.
Schwarz has more experience with
higher education issues than Walberg.
Schwarz chaired the Appropriations
Subcommittee on Higher Education in
the state Senate before serving in the
U.S. House, where he oversaw increas-
es in the higher education budget for
Michigan. Walberg has not served on
any higher education committees, but
said he tried to reduce the size of gov-
ernment in other places to make more
money available for higher education.
Schwarz is co-sponsoring a bill that
makes permanent tax exemptions for
certain education savings accounts
such as the Michigan Education Trust.
Walberg was less definitive on plans for
higher education, but said he supports
need-based financial aid and efforts to
reduce bureaucracy at universities to
decrease the cost of college.
While the club thinks Schwarz isn't
the only Republican who deserves to
be tossed out next year, its goal is to
influence the most competitive pri-
mary races.
In 2004 the club endorsed 22 can-
didates for office and saw 17 win,
establishing itself as a serious player
in Republican politics.
It has never unseated an incumbent,
an experience club president Pat Toom-
ey experienced first-hand when he
failed to wrest the Republican nomina-

to the cloning of Dolly the sheep in
1996 led to overly restrictive regula-
tions.
Meisner has drafted legislation to
remove restrictions on embryonic
stem cell techniques while strength-
ening the penalty against the less
scientifically sound technique of
human reproductive cloning.
The bill is stuck in legislative
limbo.
Meisner, a University alum, urged
students to speak out and become
advocates for what they believe in.
"Set up a meeting with your rep-
resentative," Meisner said. "Get
two or 20 or 2,000 of your friends
involved."
was a testament to just how many lives
Snik touched in his brief yet brilliant life.
As I watched images of Snik flash on
a projection screen at the far end of the
darkened pool, the reflection of those pic-
tures superimposed on the serene water
between the lane markers, I remembered
something Urbanchek told me last week:
"The lights went out, but the Olym-
pic torch is still burning in heaven,"
Urbanchek said. "He's going to walk
right in there carrying the torch."
Rest in peace, Snik. We'll miss you.
- Gabe Edelson can be reached
at gedelson@umich.edu. A trust fund
has been organized to support Austin
and Madison. To donate, please make
checks payable to "SNIK'S KIDS" or
"The Eric Namesnik Memorial Fund."
Donations should be mailed to: SNIK'S
KIDS, United Bank and Trust, 2723S.
State Street, Ann Arbor, MI48104.
tion for the U.S. Senate in Pennsylva-
nia away from Arlen Specter two years
ago.
Keating attributed Toomey's loss
to Specter's incumbency and endorse-
ment by the Republican establishment,
including President Bush. Keating said
this race will be different.
"We think that Congressman
Schwarz is a lot more vulnerable than
Arlen Specter was in the beginning,"
Keating said, adding that Toomey still
finished close to Specter.
Schwarz's incumbency has not gone
unnoticed by Walberg or the club, both
of whom have acknowledged incum-
bents usually win re-election.
"I would be a fool to not firmly
believe that incumbency has its strong
benefits," Walberg said. "But there's
also a record. I have a record and Con-
gressman Joe Schwarz has a record
that goes back in time to his time in the
state Senate as well."
Walberg said his campaign is active-
ly seeking more endorsements and has
already raised a six-figure campaign
fund.
Keating said the club will use
the same advertising consultant
who worked on the Toomey cam-
paign against Schwarz. The club is
expected to purchase television and
radio ads supporting Walberg in the
future.
Marsden said his camp has been
thinking about a primary challenge
for a year, but is not afraid of the club,
which endorsed another primary oppo-
nent of Schwarz in 2004.
"We've beat Club for Growth once
and we will beat the Club for Growth
again," Marsden said.
While political action committees
can only donate $5,000 to a candidate,
the club encourages its 30,000 members
to donate to candidates it endorses.

For Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2006
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
This is a poor day for making financial
decisions. Because you're confused
about something, you hesitate. This
means you cannot fully stand up for
yourself. Best not to act.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
This is a tough day. You feel like
you're damned if you do and damned if
you don't. You can't win! Discussions
with parents and bosses seem to paralyze
you. Do nothing. Just wait.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
You're not sure what to do today
because, within you, you feel self-doubt
about something. This makes you hesi-
tate. You don't know which way to jump.
Therefore, do nothing.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
If you think something fishy is going
on between you and a friend or you and
a member of a group - you're right. It
is! Always trust your gut instincts.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
It's hard to know what authority fig-
ures want from you today. (These people
could be parents, bosses or teachers.)
Just play along.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)

fused! Bide your time.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
By nature, you are decisive. You tend
to see things in a black-and-white way.
But today, many people are not sure
what to do about a lot of things.
Therefore, just wait.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Someone at work might deceive you
today. This could be intentional or acci-
dental; either way, you're working with
faulty information! Be on guard for this.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Romance, love affairs, vacation plans
and dealings with children are areas that
you feel doubtful about today. If you're
not sure what to do, wait.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20to Feb. 18)
There has been confusion and chaos at
home due to moves, activity, visiting
guests or family conflict.dToday you feel
paralyzed about what to do. If you don't
know what to do, do nothing.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Something having to do with money,
finances or your possessions is not clear
today. Avoid important decisions regard-
ing these areas.
YOU BORN TODAY You're fun-lov-
ing and imaginative. Not only do you
want to have a good time, you want oth-

show

your favpdtes ome love.
2~
-

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