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November 01, 2005 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2005-11-01

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, November 1, 2005 - 7

BRATER
Continued from page 1.
But supporters of juvenile justice reform
say now is the time for change. Nationally,
juvenile justice law is undergoing massive
changes, with many states overturning tough
legislation passed in the 1990s that stiffened
sentences for juvenile offenders and lowered
the age at which the accused could be tried
as adults.
"It can be a very big political hot potato;
no one wants to be soft on crime," said Shelli
Weisburg, legislative director of the Michi-
gan chapter of the ACLU. "But this is really
a juvenile justice issue that is long overdue."
While Brater's proposal has not yet
encountered loud resistance, some state leg-
islators are hesitant to rush into reform.
Sen. Alan Cropsey (R-DeWitt) said despite
the recent studies, the state Senate needs to
see much more information before it can
entertain Brater's proposed bill.
"To redo a judicial sentence is really, real-
ly tricky," he said. "It's not that we don't need
to relook at this, we just have to be really
careful."
Cropsey pointed to the case of John Rod-
ney McRea of St. Claire Shores. Rodney
was convicted in 1950 of killing an 8-year-
old boy, slashing his throat and genitals and
hiding his body under a concrete slab in a
drain field. Although McRea was only 15 at
the time, state law allowed him to be tried
as an adult.
McRea was sentenced to life without
parole, but in 1972, then-Gov. William Mil-
liken commuted his sentence because of his
good behavior. After being released, he com-
pleted his parole and moved to Florida with
the michigan da

his wife and son. Since his move, Florida
police have investigated him in connection
with the disappearances of two young boys.
"(This) would never have happened if he
had not been let out of prison," Cropsey said.
"That's why we need to say, 'OK, who are we
talking about here to be letting out?"'
But reform supporters say many youths
who commit violent crimes can change with
proper rehabilitation.
"What we know in terms of moral devel-
opment - and we're learning more all the
time - is that it comes on in some people
much later than we normally think," said
Tom Croxton, a psychology professor emeri-
tus who studied juvenile justice and ethics at
the University.
To hold juveniles morally responsible
for crimes they committed when "they
were not morally developed makes no
sense," he added.
The United States stands out internation-
ally for its tough juvenile justice system.
According to the Amnesty International
report, all countries except the United States
and Somalia have ratified international trea-
ties condemning "life imprisonment without
possibility of release" for "offenses commit-
ted by persons below eighteen years of age."
The U.S. Supreme Court boosted juve-
nile justice reform last year when it ruled
that juvenile executions violated the Eighth
Amendment in the landmark case Roper v.
Simmons. Writing for the majority, Justice
Anthony Kennedy cited arguments similar
to Croxton's, writing, "Retribution is not pro-
portional if the law's most severe penalty is
imposed on one whose culpability or blame-
worthiness is diminished, to a substantial
degree, by reason of youth and immaturity."

NORICH
Continued from page 1
versity for me," said Rackham student Sara Feldman.
"She crosses disciplines and is accessible."
The largest-ever gift to the college of LSA - a $20
million donation from the Samuel and Jean Frankel
Jewish Heritage Foundation - will fund the institute.
Most of that money will go toward hiring faculty to
conduct research at the University.
The 14 scholars will work together on a common
topic or theme. The institute aims to give these schol-
ars the time and means to devote to Judaic studies.
"We give these scholars a community in which to
work," Norich said. "This is a place where interdisci-
plinary scholarship can flourish.
The institute is the largest of its kind at any pub-
lic university in the country, Norich said, adding
that it will attract scholars at both the national and
international level.
"(The creation of the Frankel Institute) is the
biggest thing to happen to Judaic studies any-
where," said Norich. "This makes the University
of Michigan one of the biggest centers for Judaic
studies in the world."
Housed on the third floor of the Frieze Build-
ing, it will allow intellectual and physical space for
renowned scholars to work. The ceremony for the
opening of the institute is scheduled for next week
at the Rackham Auditorium.
"Michigan will be the address of advanced Jew-
ish studies in the country," Norich said.
The Frankel Center offers a full range of chrono-
logical and methodical studies for both graduate
and undergraduate students. Its faculty encompass-
es a wide range of fields in the discipline.
The center trains new scholars in contemporary
and traditional methodologies and texts, offering
a variety of services to students of Jewish culture
and literature.

MCRI
Continued from page 1
mative action as a moral disgrace. He said the
end of the use of race as a factor in admis-
sions policies at the University will be ben-
eficial.
"It's a good thing because in a good soci-
ety, people do not discriminate on the basis
of the color of people's skin," he said.
University President Mary Sue Coleman
has repeatedly affirmed her opposition to
MCRI.
Other opponents of MCRI argue that
besides posing a threat to programs target-
ing minorities, the proposal will lead to the
end of University programs that further the
hiring of women. ADVANCE, a program
that helps recruit and hire women in scienc-
es and engineering fields, could be elimi-
nated if the proposal is approved.
LSA junior Alex Moffett, vice president
of the University's NAACP chapter, said
MCRI's proposal will also present obsta-
cles to organizations like the Society of
Women Engineers.
Moffett said affirmative action helps pro-
vide opportunities to students from high
schools in low-income areas, where many
students belong to a racial minority group.
"Until the disparities that usually follow
along racial lines are corrected, then things
like affirmative action will still need to
exist," she said.
NAACP now plans to focus its efforts on
fundraising and education in the hope of sti-
fling the proposal's support, Moffett said.

- The Associated Press
contributed to this report

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For Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2005
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
This is the perfect day to think about
ways to improve your approach to how
you handle shared property, paying your
bills and taking care of red-tape details.
Think of one way to do this.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
Today's New Moon offers you an
opportunity to observe your closest rela-
tionships and partnerships. Remember:
You must be as good for your partner as
he or she is for you.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
Each New Moon is the perfect time to
start some resolutions. This is a good day
to think about how you can improve
your approach to work and how you do
your job.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
Yours is a nurturing sign. This is the
only New Moon all year that urges you
to improve your parenting style and your
way of dealing with young people.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Think of ways to improve your home
and where you live. Remember:
Kindness at home is the most important
thing.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)

how you earn your money and how to
spend it.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21).
Today's New Moon is in your sign.
This is the only time all year this will
happen. Therefore, think about the kind
of impression you create on your audi-
ence.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Yours is a philosophical sign. (That's
why you like travel and other cultures.)
This is a good time to think about your
inner world and your spiritual values.
What does your image look like?
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Are you happy with your friends?
What kind of friend are you? If you want
to have friends in your life, be friendly.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
This is the perfect day to think about
how you relate to authority figures in
your life. (Your sign is rebellious by
nature.)
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Think about what you can do to learn
something new. How can you expand
your experience of the world? Buy a
book? Why not visit someplace differ-
ent?
YOU BORN TODAY You are kind-
hearted and altruistic. (But you need a

ARE YOU

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