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October 21, 2005 - Image 7

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 21, 2005 - 7

VOTING
Continued from page 1
ballot was counted or not counted."
Not all counties in Michigan have
transitioned so smoothly. In Wayne
County, the selection of a vendor that
will supply the optical scanners has led
to a disagreement between the county
clerk and the city of Detroit. While the
county clerk's office has recommended
the machines produced by Election Sys-
tems and Software, Detroit has requested
machines made by Sequoia Voting Sys-
tems, another approved vendor.
Gloria Williams, Detroit's director of
elections, said the ES&S machines are
bulky and inaccurate.
"If I put the ballot through the machine
five times, I might get three different
answers," she said.
She also said the ES&S ballots may not
be large enough to allow for a long list of
candidates, leading to potential problems
with voters casting multiple ballots.
"(Voters) would be discouraged,
and it would be a logistical nightmare
for election workers," she said. "I can't
imagine doing a recount with two bal-
lots per voter."
The Secretary of State's spokesman
Ken Silfven said Wayne County's situa-
tion is unusual.
"(In) virtually every other county, it's
a uniform vendor," he said.
The state's plan grants authority to the
county to select a vendor, but Silfven said
the process is supposed to be a partnership
between county and city governments.
"The whole process is designed to pro-
mote and encourage involvement within
the county," he said.
The question remains of how the
new technologies, once in place, will
be updated - HAVA doesn't guarantee
additional funding. Michael Traugott,
a professor of communication studies
and author of a recent study on voting
technologies, pointed out the difference
between computerized technology and
older lever machines is the need for con-
stant updates.
"Once you use computers and soft-
ware, this technology is going to be
changing all the time," he said. "Congress

thinks of this as a one-time commitment.
The pressure will grow for (Congress)
to (fund future upgrades), but there's no
guarantee that they would step in again."
The Secretary of State will be taking
public comment on the state's plan for
one more week.
When choosing a new voting tech-
nology, Land rejected direct recording
electronic voting system, an apparatus
that allows citizens to vote with a touch-
screen computer. Silfven said there are
many problems with the DRE. He said
Land had concerns over the system's lack
of a paper trail in the case of a recount.
Traugott echoed Land's concerns.
"The DRE machines are supposed to
eventually be able to print a receipt that
can be deposited for recount, but there's
been a fair number of problems," he said.
Traugott's study examined the effec-
tiveness of voting technologies in Michi-
gan and Florida during the 2000 and
2004 elections. Traugott said Michigan's
voting technologies were centralized,
with the state mandating optical scanners
in every county. Florida - on the other
hand - will use a combination of optical
scanners and DRE machines.
Silfven said using only one technol-
ogy makes the voting process easier and
more uniform for voters.
"When you just have one system, it's
easier for the state to conduct voter edu-
cation outreach because you can focus on
that one system."
In looking at these technologies, Trau-
gott's study did not detect any negative
side-effects of either system.
"If people didn't like the technology,
it could produce lower levels of turnout,"
Traugott said. "We don't seem to detect
that yet."
Traugott did find that as spoiled votes
declined with the transition to better
technologies, Democratic candidates
benefited more than Republicans.
"That wouldn't be unexpected because
of who we know tends to associate with
the parties and who would tend to be
more confused at the polling place," he
said; referring to the low education and
income levels of some Democratic sup-
porters. "The new technology eliminates
some of (this confusion)."

BUS
Continued from page 1
Detroit Institute of Arts, a walking tour of public art in
Detroit, a tour of the Matrix Theater and visits to two
galleries in southwestDetroit.
She said the Culture Bus helps her students learn
more about the city of Detroit.
"(The culture bus) exposes them to the largest and
most well-established Latina/o community in South-
eastern Michigan. It demystifies Detroit, a place that
few of my students have ventured into and about which
they have many misconceptions."
Since the inception of the Culture Bus program, it has
enhanced the learning experience for participants by
conducting more tours with faculty members as guides.
The Culture Bus also offers students rare opportuni-
ties, such as visits to the temporary exhibit "Behind the
Magic: The Influence and Impact of Walt Disney and
Disneyland" at Dearborn's Henry Ford Museum. The
trip includes attending a conference on Disney's legacy
and a tour of the exhibit.
Communications Studies lecturer Brad Taylor said
he plans to take his "Visual Communications" class on
the trip. He said the conference is a "once in a lifetime

opportunity" because Marty Sklar, vice chairman and
principal creative executive for Disney, will be the key-
note speaker.
Not all Culture Bus trips are class requirements. One
such trip was last month's visit to the Arab American
National Museum in Dearborn. Along with the muse-
um visit, the trip also included a tour through the Arab
American neighborhood, dinner at a Middle Eastern
restaurant and dessert and Turkish coffee at the Sinbad
Caf6 in Dearborn.
The Culture Bus has grown from initially offering
trips only to Detroit to traveling to locations in other
parts of Michigan and even other states. The upcoming
"Halloween Weekend with the Art of Chicago" tour is
the first overnight Culture Bus trip. It includes a tour of
the city's architecture by boat, several museum visits
and a viewing of Shakespeare's "Merchant of Venice" at
the Chicago Shakespeare Theater.
Nancy Lautenbach, coordinator of marketing and
programs for Arts at Michigan, said she wants to allow
residence hall advisors to organize customized Culture
Bus tours. She said the trips would be a great way for
RAs to conduct social activities because they "get to go
to shows and museums at very discounted rates."

KAY
Continued from page 1
intelligence is a lack of accountability, he said.
Kay said few officials in U.S. intelligence agencies
are willing to tell policymakers what they don't want to
hear, and even fewer are willing to admit they don't know
something.
Kay said he is also concerned about the large num-
ber of failed states that may acquire WMDs out of des-
peration.
"I'm convinced the dominant focus of international

politics in the next 25 years is going to be learning to
deal with a failing-state system," he said.
LSA freshman Daniel Albertus, who attended yes-
terday's lecture, agreed with Kay that U.S. intelligence
gathering is flawed.
"In order to overcome the problem of nuclear prolifera-
tion, we have to overcome the problems of the system,"
he said.
But Kay said preventing proliferation is not only a task
for the United States.
"It's an international thing, but we must lead it," he
said.

FBI
Continued from page 1
The group's chairman is Graham
Spanier, president of Pennsylvania
State University. Spanier said much of
the change Gutmann described dates
from the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.
"The university community gener-
ally has come to feel that they need to
be part of the solution," Spanier said.
Gates recalled going to see Vice
President Dick Cheney and Andrew
Card, President Bush's chief of staff,
to discuss problems foreign students
were having obtaining visas after
the attacks.
"I made the comment that this isn't
the '60s and '70s. The universities
want to be helpful. We understand the
threats to the country and, unlike in
the past, there is a real opportunity for
cooperation that is beneficial to both
sides," Gates said.
The FBI has described the board's
mission as offering advice about the
traditions of openness, academic
freedom and international collabora-
tion. Mueller has said the board also
could serve as a recruitment tool for
the FBI and other law enforcement
agencies.
The presidents see the exchange as
an opportunity to press their own con-
cerns about the treatment of foreign
students, the international exchange
of technology and security issues at
laboratories that work with anthrax
and other deadly substances.
Yet the terrorist attacks have not
completely rehabilitated the FBI's
image on college campuses, several
presidents and historians said.
The bureau was badly damaged
in the 1970s by revelations about
its COINTELPRO program, begun
under J. Edgar Hoover and aimed at
disrupting civil rights, student and
dissident groups.
Even since Sept. 11, civil libertari-
ans and student activists have voiced
concerns that the bureau again is
trying to stifle lawful protest, and
that the FBI's presence on campuses
could chill open exchanges.

COMMISSION
Continued from page 1
very accessible.... We're the best in the world."
Barry Toiv, spokesman for the Association of Ameri-
can Universities, said federal government intervention in
the inner workings of colleges would be a "disaster." He
explained that the autonomy of American higher education
is what sets it apart.
"The proof is in the pudding," Toiv said. "But that said, the
world changes, and we always need to ensure that we're doing
the best job that we can."
Toiv said the commission has expressed no desire to rein in
or homogenize universities but added that the AAU would be
keeping a close eye on it.
Duderstadt emphasized that although the federal gov-

ernment may act on the body's recommendations, uni-
versities will ultimately be responsible for implementing
meaningful changes. He added that Spellings has stated
specifically that she has no intention of robbing universi-
ties of their independence.
"The tradition has been that the federal government has
stimulated and enabled change," Duderstadt said. "I don't
think that the government will be Big Brother or Big Sister in
this case, but will be the facilitator."
University spokeswoman Julie Peterson said the University
is looking forward to the commission's recommendations.
"Everyone sees this as a challenge and something we need
to tackle, but we don't really know what the path will be yet,"
Peterson said. "Obviously we're going to be following this
commission closely and with a special interest because for-
mer president Duderstadt is on (it)."

the michigan daily

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For Friday, Oct. 21, 2005
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
You will adore the arts and all things
beautiful today. Even philosophical, reli-
gious and spiritual ideas move you -
perhaps to tears - in an inspirational
way.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
You feel generous deep within you.
You want to help those who are less for-
tunate than you are. You'll do anything
(including working with the resources of
others) to be able to assist those who
need it.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
It's pleasant talking to partners and
friends today. You feel unusually sympa-
thetic to each other's thoughts and
words. Just make sure that you stay real-
istic. (It's easy to get carried away on
Cloud Nine.)
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
Your idealism is aroused at work.
Perhaps you want to help a co-worker.
Perhaps a co-worker wants to help you.
This is a good thing.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
It's hard not to fall in love with some-
body today - that's for sure. You've got
your heart on your sleeve. Look for

tiations are fair to all parties, especially
you.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
You're tempted to spend your money
on luxury today. Alternatively, you're
tempted to spend your money on people
who are suffering. Which do you think
will give you the most long-term satis-
faction?
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
You feel like Mother Teresa today.
Your heart is tender, and you want to
help anyone who needs it. You see that
we're all in this Big Soup together.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Time spent in solitude will be reward-
ing for you today. You need some quiet
time just for yourself. Go somewhere to
contemplate your navel or smell the
roses.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
You feel loving toward a friend. You
might join forces with others to perform
charitable activities for society. You
want to do something for the greater
good.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Today people look at you as a sympa-
thetic, caring person. Meanwhile, you
might be developing a crush on your

St.=Study M=May S=Sept.

ir~ r

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