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October 20, 2005 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2005-10-20

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 7A

WOLV-TV
Continued from page 1A
an aerobics program. Ho said students should expect
all new entertainment programming this year as
well. "We're essentially starting everything from
scratch," Ho said.
Another aspect of the new format, which began
this semester, is WOLV's new partnership with the
Residential Computing office. Rescomp provides
technical expertise in repairing the station's older
equipment and in assessing requests for new equip-
ment, according to Rescomp director Jeff Wright.
Ho estimated that the station had spent about
$25,000 on updated equipment so far. The new
equipment has given WOLV greater ability to broad-
cast graphics, offsite reporting and weather reports,
he said.
Because WOLV has alumni at MTV, CNBC
and other broadcast outlets, the station hopes to tap
these resources and others as it continues to improve.
Communications Prof. Anthony Collings, a new
advisor for the station this semester, is a professional
resource already present at the University. Collings, a
former print journalist who wrote for Newsweek and
The Wall Street Journal, won an Emmy for his work
as a CNN correspondent before joining the faculty of
the communications department.
Ho said WOLV remains student-run and has full
editorial freedom, but Collings brings his years of
experience to the station by editing scripts, advising
on broadcast techniques and generally making him-
self available to answer students' questions.
HOURS
Continued from page 1A
Tuesday headed to the Art, Architecture, and
Engineering Library on North Campus, which
maintained its normal hours throughout the break.
"I knew that they were closing early during the
break, so my group decided to meet in the (Duder-
the michigan daily

"Prof. Collings is a huge resource, both in
terms of his experience and his contacts in the
field," Ho said.
For his part, Collings said he is confident about
the improvements in the station.
"The more the news program connects with stu-
dents and their interests, the more effective it will
be in attracting more viewers," he said in an e-mail
message.
Collings also suggested that some criticism of the
station may be unfounded.
"The station was in good shape, but there was
room for improvement, and the students were very
dedicated to upgrading the quality," Collings said,
referring to the state of WOLV before he began
advising it.
WOLV was founded in 1994, one year after cable
television was installed in University residence
halls. It had little content at first, covering mostly
University sporting events - especially hockey.
The remaining time was filled by Infochannel, a
University Housing-sponsored service that broad-
casts various University announcements and infor-
mation in a Powerpoint-style format. In 1996, the
station constructed a studio in South Quadrangle
Residence Hall and began airing student-produced
news and entertainment programs. Since then,
WOLV has kept its focus on local, student-based
programming.
WOLV can be seen on Channel 70 of the Uni-
versity residence hall cable system. "Newsfeed,"
the station's nightly news program, also appears on
Channel 22 of Ann Arbor's Comcast Cable system.
stadt Center, where the library is housed), and so the
reduced hours didn't affect us much," said Engineer-
ing sophomore Robert Havey.
LSA freshman Zach Liporace was among
those unaffected by the reduced hours.
"I was out of town during the break, and so the
reduced hours did not have much of an effect on me,"
Liporace said.

DIAG DAY
Continued from page 1A
who we are, what we're about."
MSA has been doing more than booking
concerts lately. The CHANGE program - con-
sisting of inter-group dialogues, service oppor-
tunities and collaborations with the NAACP
and other national groups - and a joint com-
mittee with City Council are two of its recent
projects.
"CHANGE is really big," Levine said. "The
point is to change the culture of this place." The
ongoing program, Levine said, is designed to
help students have a greater understanding of
where other people are coming from.
The joint committee with City Council,
which the Council approved on Monday, was a
major achievement for MSA, which will have
the power to appoint the five student mem-
bers. The idea for the committee came from

second-ward City Council candidate Stephen
Rapundalo, a Democrat, after several months
of public criticism of City Council by Levine
and other MSA representatives, who accused
the Council of failing to seek student input on
city policy.
The committee will "institutionalize commu-
nication between students and Council members,"
according to the MSA's 2005-06 agenda.
Diag Day also served as an opportunity for
MSA to inform students of their rights and
responsibilities regarding alcohol, a personal
issue for Levine, whose friend was threatened
with arrest when he went to the University Hos-
pital for alcohol poisoning.
"I don't want students to be afraid to go to
the hospital. This is echoed by the police and
echoed by the University administration,"
Levine said.
To inform students on the issue, MSA repre-
sentatives handed out packets with information

on their rights and responsibilities regard-
ing alcohol. They also played root beer pong
throughout Diag Day as a way to draw atten-
tion to the event as a whole and alcohol issues
in particular.
Diag Day's major selling point was the
recently announced Ludacris concert, to be
held in Hill Auditorium on Nov. 3. There are
still about 1,500 tickets available for the show,
and Levine said he encouraged students to pur-
chase them before they go on sale to the general
public on Oct. 25.
MSA held the event to get information about
student government out to students, and it
appeared to work.
"A lot of people have come by and picked up
flyers," Stallings said.
When asked why he stopped by, LSA junior
Doug Emeott said, "I saw they were trying to
get word out. I was kind of interested in the first
place. I was interested in knowing more."

TUITION
Continued from page 1A
$7,100, coming in higher than the national average,
as well as than Colorado's $4,260 and Kentucky's
$4,880.
Across the nation, tuition and fees rose 7 per-
cent to an average of $5,491 at four-year public
institutions. The national increase is lower than
the 10 percent rise in 2004-2005 and the 13 per-
cent rise for 2003-2004. It remains above the
rate of inflation.
Michigan's 12 percent increase follow two years
of state increases falling below the national aver-
age, said Dan Hurley, spokesman for the Presidents
Council, State Universities of Michigan.
Hurley said the study found that the largest
increases happen when state funding is cut.
"The state has cut its appropriation by $200

million over four years and enrollment has grown
by 10,000 students," he said.
Nationally, prices at two-year public colleges,
which educate nearly half of American college stu-
dents, rose 5.4 percent to $2,191. At four-year private,
nonprofit colleges, costs rose 5.9 percent to $21,235.
The results come as Congress is negotiating a
new version of the Higher Education Act, which
would set federal financial aid policy for the com-
ing years. A House version passed last month
increases some grants, but critics say it would
harm borrowers by cutting $9 billion from student
loan programs.
College Board officials and university presidents
devoted, much of a news conference announcing
the results to concerns over college access for poor
students, who - even if they have high test scores
- earn college degrees at significantly lower rates
than rich students. They also criticized the prolif-

eration of popular state programs that award col-
lege grants based on merit, not need.
"Basically, they are subsidizing the education
of middle- and upper-income families," said Wil-
liam Kirwan, chancellor of Maryland's university
system, citing as an example the Georgia Hope
Scholarship program, which covers'tuition and
fees ata Georgia public university to any student
with a B average.
While state spending on need-based aid has
increased, merit-based aid has grown faster
in recent years, College Board and university
officials noted. Merit aid went from 10 per-
cent of all state aid- in 1993 to 26 percent by
2003, the most recent year for which figures
are available.
Including charges for room and board, published
costs at public four-year schools rose 6.6 percent to
an average of $11,376.

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WOMEN NEEDED FOR research study:
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For Thursday, Oct. 20, 2005
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
This is the first really decent day all
week that you can count on your ability
to negotiate, teach, market, sell and talk
to others. Go right ahead with negotia-
tions and signing contracts.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
This is a fine day to make important
purchases. Whatever you buy will likely'
be practical and will last for a long time.
You feel very sensible today.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
The Moon is in your sign today. Not
only that, it is strongly aspecting other
planets. You feel grounded, logical and
competent. You're in a good frame of
mind to deal with anyone or anything.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
This is an excellent day for research.
You're prepared to roll up your sleeves
and work hard at whatever is right in
front of you.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Talk to someone older today. Get the
advice of those who are wiser and more
experienced than you. Besides, you can
save money by learning from the mis-
takes of others.
VIRGO

education, the law and medicine.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
You have a much better idea today
about how to deal with the resources of
others. You also know how to divide
something or spend a set amount of
money.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Discussions with partners will be very
fruitful today. You've got your head in
the clouds, but your feet are planted
firmly on the ground.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
You could really get a lot done today
at work. You're like a hot knife cutting
through butter. Your mind is logical, ana-
lytical and practical right now. Zowie!
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
This is a good day for artists to figure
out how to market their wares. It's also
an excellent day for people who work
with children or are involved in the arts
and professional sports.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Make long-range plans for family
members and real estate. Purchase prac-
tical items for your home. It's a good day
to make repairs where you live.
YOU BORN TODAY You're logical,
sensible and have a lot of street smarts.

CM8 MANAGEMENT
Voted
BEST LANDLORD
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By Current Magazine
Reader's Picks 2004 & 2004
Annual Ann Arbor Guide
22 CAMPUS LOCATIONS
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916 Mary 7
418 E. Kingsley A 6
418 E. Kingsley B 7
1522 Geddes 7
926 Sylvan 7
909 Sylan 8
927 S. State 6
933 S. State 7
1303 S. State 6

3K
2
2
3J
3J
3J
2J
3
3J

6
31
41
7
6
7
4
3
5

May
M or S
M orS
Sept
M or S
M or S
May
May
Sept

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