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October 19, 2005 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2005-10-19

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 19, 2005 - 7A

PROTEST
Continued from page 1A
ances and to protest Newman as a senior
executive at Northwest.
Newman spoke briefly at the event,
which was held in Rackham Auditorium,
to introduce University President Mary
Sue Coleman.
Seven picketers entered the auditorium
before the ceremony. They booed when
Newman spoke and left after her brief
introductory remarks.
One union member said Newman's
presence at the event was hypocriti-
cal. "From what I've read about Arthur
Miller, he was very outspoken on social
injustices, just the opposite of what (New-
man) speaks for," said Ralph Neopolitan,
a mechanic for Northwest and an AMFA
member.
Newman has been on the University
Board of Regents since 1994. In 2000,
she served as vice chair of President
Bush's Michigan campaign. In the last
presidential election, she was a "Pioneer"
level fundraiser for the Bush's re-election
campaign, meaning she raised, at least
$100,000.
Newman refused to comment and
referred The Michigan Daily to a North-
west spokesperson.
In their two protests at the University,
members of the mechanics union have
stressed that replacement workers used by
the airline are inexperienced and prone to
make mistakes.

"Their replacement workers aren't up to speed, and
they're not properly trained. Some of these people have
not event seen the airplanes they are working on,"
-John Papudnick
Aircraft mechanic

"Their replacement workers aren't up
to speed, and they're not properly trained.
Some of these people have not even seen
the airplanes they're working on," said
John Papudnick, who has been an aircraft
mechanic for 21 years.
Neopolitan said simply, "It's not safe to
fly on Northwest right now."
These claims are somewhat validated
by a Federal Aviation Administration
report originally obtained by the Minne-
apolis Star Tribune and published on Oct.
1. The report cited numerous instances
in which replacement workers made seri-
ous mistakes or oversights, but they were
either caught by supervisors before take-
off or did not directly threaten the safety
of the flight.
Northwest spokesperson Kurt Ebenhoch
said that both the picketers and the Star
Tribune were mistaken. He said that 64
percent of Northwest's replacement work-
ers had at least 10 years of experience and
that Northwest's operations had actually
improved under the replacements.
Protestors remained outside for the

duration of the ceremony. They picketed
on both sides of Washington Street in
silence or chatted amongst themselves.
Most carried placards with pictures of
Newman that read "Face of Corporate
Greed" and "Look Kids, Lying Does
Pay."
There were few students in the area.
Members of the pro-labor campus activ-
ist group Students Organizing for Labor
and Economic Equality, which supported
the protest outside Newman's Main Street
apartment earlier this month, were not
present at Friday's demonstration. Many
students who saw the strikers didn't know
what they were protesting.
"I'm not really sure what they're out
there for," said Andrew More, an LSA
freshman who attended the naming cer-
emony.
Negotiations between Northwest and
AMFA are ongoing. The AMFA's mem-
bers will vote on Northwest's most recent
proposal - which would save about 500
out of 4,400 union jobs - within two
weeks.

MARCH
Continued from page 1A
communities in comparison to the mainstream white
American community," Duncan said. "The march
represents a coming together to address the issues that
are still causing those disparities."
Because much racism is "no longer overt," he
added, many people forget about institutionalized
racism.
Yesterday Duncan wore a T-shirt he received
at the march, advocating positive mobilization of
communities and the power of the individual. He
said his trip to Washington changed his outlook not
only on the black community, but on the power he
possesses as an individual.
NAACP spokeswoman Chantal Cotton said she
was proud that the group of University students that
attended the march was composed of a diverse set
of ethnicities.
"I thought it was great that not only African-
American students saw the importance of attending
the march, but we also had Hispanic and Caucasian
students with us," Cotton said. "And the whole pur-
pose of the trip is positive in the sense that all the
different students came together to march."
Anderson agreed that the diverse group of stu-

dents made the trip satisfying. "The fact that all
these organizations were on the bus together signi-
fied the message behind the march, which is unity,"
she said.
She added that the main learning experience
was not only physically participating in the march,
but also listening to the many speakers during the
event.
Speakers at the march included Russell Sim-
mons, Jesse Jackson, Erykah Badu, Al Sharpton
and Louis Farrakhan.
"The main theme behind each speaker at the
event was the power beheld by every individual and
how, if we organize together, we can make changes
in our community," Anderson said.
She said she wants to bring this theme of unity
back to the University. For example, Anderson said
in addition to holding events such as movie screen-
ings, student organizations need to think about what
else they could be doing that could better improve
their community in a constructive way.
"Everybody can learn how a group of people can
bring an issue to a nation's forefront just by coming
together and voicing their feelings," Duncan said.
"There's power in numbers."
- The Associated Press contributed to this report.

CITY
Continued from page 1A
brought the proposal to the council, has accepted
the mayor's request to sit on the committee and
said he anticipates being appointed in the near
future.
"This will be a great opportunity for students

and Council members to work with each other
directly," Greden said. "I'm confident that this
will be a benefit for both Council members and
students."
The mayor has not yet released any other rec-
ommendations for the committee, but Rapundalo
said he would love to serve as a member of the
committee if he is elected next month.

DUDERSTADT
Continued from page 1A
Jobs in this knowledge-based economy would
be composed of service-oriented professions in
fields like engineering and information technol-
ogy. Graduates from the state universities would
fuel the system, because they would be equipped
with the necessary skills and could be readily
employed by businesses in the service industry.
To ensure that state universities can also com-
pete on a global scale, Duderstadt calls for an
increase in state funding sufficient to put Michi-
gan into the top quartile of state-funded institu-
tions. He added that the state is currently in the
bottom third.
Duderstadt blames universities' funding prob-
lems on a culture of entitlement left over from
Michigan's more economically prosperous years.
The reason the state is having so much trouble
funding education, he said, is that it has cut taxes
and increased benefits for other institutions.
According to University spokeswoman Julie
Peterson, state funding has posed a serious public
policy challenge. She said that in difficult econom-
ic times, funding for education is one of the first
things to go.
"It's something people feel they can be discre-
tionary about," Peterson said.
University President Mary Sue Coleman, who
has had several conversations with. Duderstadt

about his report, said if state officials were to imple-
ment Duderstadt's plan, they would see "an incred-
ible return on their investment, because it would be
a stimulus to the state economy."
"(The increase) would certainly be a step
in the right direction, given what we've been
through the last four years," she added.
But critics of increased school funding won-
der how the plan intends to keep that invest-
ment in the state.
Rich Studley, vice president of the Michigan
Chamber of Commerce, said the state can produce
these skilled workers more cheaply by selectively
funding certain majors at state universities. He
added that instead of specializing, many univer-
sities churn out students in every field possible,
especially fields like English and political science,
unrelated to the hard-science fields that would pre-
pare students for high-tech jobs.
"I think that people are going to insist that uni-
versity presidents do a better job with the taxes they
receive today." Studley said, adding that many peo-
ple who work outside the university system see the
universities as insular and self-serving. "It's hard to
see their positive impact on communities and the
state as a whole."
State Rep. Chris Kolb (D-Ann Arbor) also
expressed concern that the state might not see a
return on its investment. He mentioned specifically
that large amounts of money allocated to education
might not benefit the state unless some money is

reserved to create jobs.
"We produce maybe 4 to 5,000 engineering stu-
dents a year, but they go to other places," Kolb said.
He added that unless the state works to create new
jobs, Michigan will not see any benefits from better
universities. "It won't do us any good to increase
the number of graduates if they continue just to
leave the state."
Gov. Jennifer Granholm has been an advocate
of increased education funding and education
reform, although she has cut funding for high-
er education since taking office in 2002. Heidi
Hansen, a spokeswoman for the governor, said
Granholm aims to double the number of college
graduates in the state and at the same time to
create desirable jobs in Michigan for students
once they graduate.
"Jim Duderstadt understands that Michigan's
economic future depends on our ability to invest
in research (which will result in an increase of)
the number of our residents with college degrees,
and the governor could not agree with him more,"
Hansen said. "Our staff has looked at his report
and he's got a lot of the same ideas that the gover-
nor is trying to invest in."
Some worry the dwindling investments in edu-
cation will threaten Michigan's ability to attract
employers. Ken MacGregor, spokesman for the
K-16 Coalition, an advocacy group for education
funding, said companies deciding on a location are
looking for states that are committed to creating an

educated workforce.
"We need a system that's going to show them an
investment in the future," MacGregor said. "That's
what they're going to be looking for, and we need
to be ready for it. And that's going to take invest-
ment now."
The K-16 Coalition is trying to push through a
ballot initiative for increased education funding
that is much less dramatic than Duderstadt's rec-
ommendations. MacGregor said he believes tax
cuts from the 1990s have deprived schools of the
money and resources they need in order to comply
with increasing demands.
Kolb said that although he thought Duder-
stadt's assessment of the state's economic prob-
lems was correct, he doubted that some of the
changes were feasible.
"I don't think that there will be too many people
that disagree that we need to invest - the big-
gest problem is that we don't have the revenue
right now," Kolb said. "It would (require) a huge
improvement in our economy."
Duderstadt said increasing taxes, or possibly tax-
ing services, would pay for the budget increases.
"In the simplest sense, our tax structure right
now is designed for a manufacturing economy,
but if you look at the new economy, it's services
- it's lawyers, doctors and accountants." Duder-
stadt said. "Politicians are afraid of the 'T-word'
- it's not a subject to discuss in polite company,
but you've got to talk about it. We've got to shed

these old-fashioned tax policies that are- stran-
gling us."
State Rep. Jerry Kooiman (R-Grand Rapids)
said he felt a broad-based tax increase would leave
less money for taxpayers to spend and move Michi-
gan in the wrong direction. Others shared his con-
cern that higher taxes would have a negative impact
on the rest of the state.
"People have a tendency to impose higher taxes
on someone else,"Studley, of the Chamberof Com-
merce, said. "You know that old saying ='-Don't
tax you, don't tax me, tax that fellow behind the
tree' - this proposal kind of reminds me of that.
We're just not persuaded that higher taxes are auto-
matically the right solution."
Studley added that a tax on services would fall
particularly heavily on low-income families and
smaller job providers that are already struggling.
Duderstadt said that even if his recommenda-
tions, could not be implemented letter-for-letter,
he hoped that the report would incite legislators to
some kind of action.
"It's a wake-up call - we've got to wake up and
realize that prosperity doesn't come to us on a sil-
ver platter," Duderstadt said. "We have wonderful
universities because of our ancestors' sacrifices; it's
now our turnto make those sacrifices."
Hansen said the governor welcomed Duder-
stadt's voice in the discussion about Michigan's
future and that she expected the report to be care-
fully read and considered by state legislators.

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For Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2005
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
This is a poor day to shop or make
important purchases. Try to hold off if
you can. Of course, you can shop for
food, but that's about it. (Save your
receipts.)
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
This is a willy-nilly day. Don't make
promises to anyone. Do not agree to
important things. Don't take on new
responsibilities. Don't make appoint-
ments. Delay these things until tomor-
row.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
This is a vague, uneasy day. However,
it can be excellent for creative activities,
meditation, yoga or just enjoying your
own solitude.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
This is a good day to goof off with
friends. However, don't make promises
to anybody. Just party and have a good
time! Keep your spending down. Avoid
major purchases.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
This is a poor day to have important
discussions with bosses and parents.
Whatever you agree to will have to be
amended or completely changed later.
C-ru clnwl~y

tant decisions about these things. Avoid
important banking transactions.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
This is a fun day to have good times
with partners and close friends.
However, it's a poor time for negotia-
tions, signing contracts or entering into
partnerships.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Expect delays and shortages at work
today. Everything will move slowly and
suffer from minor glitches. Aside from
that, it's not a bad day. It's just not an
efficient day.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
This is a wonderfully creative day for
you! It's very easy for you to think out-
of-the-box. You're full of original ideas.
Elsewhere, avoid financial speculation
today.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
Don't shop for items for your home or
for family members. Wait until tomor-
row. Whatever you initiate today will
tend not to fulfill its purpose.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
It's easy to be trapped by fuzzy think-
ing today. It's not as bad as yesterday,
but it's still there. Don't make important
deals with anyone. Promise nothing.
Wiait uintil1 tomorrow.I

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