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October 12, 2005 - Image 7

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 12, 2005 - 7

RWANDA
Continued from page 1
p.m., the Power Center reached capacity, and
more than 600 people were redirected to the
Michigan League Ballroom.
By 7 p.m., the Ballroom was standing-
room-only, and more than 100 students and
community members, some coming from as
far as an hour away, huddled around tele-
visions in the basement and lobby of the
League to watch the speech.
Rusesbagina described "the real life
behind the movie," sharing a brief history of
Rwanda before detailing how he and his fam-
ily found themselves and more than 1,000
refugees trapped in the midst of humanitar-
ian crisis.
Since Rusesabagina fled Rwanda under
the michigan daily

threat of death in 1996, he has lived in Brus-
sels with his wife, four children and two
nieces, who were orphaned in the genocide.
After working with actor Don Cheadle to
develop the film, he started the Hotel Rwan-
da Rusesabagina Foundation, an effort to
rehabilitate victims of genocide.
Rusesabagina was chosen for the medal
before the release of the film, said John God-
frey, assistant dean at the Rackham School
of Graduate Studies and chair of the Wal-
lenberg Executive Committee, the group that
awards the medal.
The University's Wallenberg Endowment
and Medal, established in 1985, is awarded
to individuals who have "made decisive com-
mitments to human rights at critical times,"
Godfrey said.
The medal's namesake, Swedish diplo-

mat and University alum Raoul Wallenberg,
saved 100,000 Jews in Budapest during the
Holocaust, only to be arrested by Soviet
authorities in 1945.
Wallenberg disappeared and has not been
heard from since.
Previous recipients of the award include
many Holocaust heroes, such as Wallen-
berg's half-sister Nina Lagergren and Miep
Gies, who sheltered Anne Frank and her
family. Other winners include South Afri-
can apartheid activist Helen Suzman and the
Dalai Lama.
Stopping today's tragedies
In a press conference preceding the event,
Rusesabagina stressed that injustice is not
over in Rwanda.

"As long as people in Rwanda are intimi-
dated, we can never talk about safety," he
told reporters.
"The current government is not clean," he
said, adding that political dissenters often
disappear and "after that their bones are
found at the top of a hill."
In his lecture, Rusesabagina accused the
global community of continued indifference
in the face of humanitarian crises, including
the massacres in Darfur, an area in western
Sudan he recently visited.
"What I saw in Rwanda, what I saw in
1994, I saw in Darfur," he said. "More than
100,000 people have been killed, and nobody
said nothing about it."
He also encouraged the audience to pay
attention to the ongoing civil war in the
Democratic Republic of Congo.

"Since 1996 up 'til now, that war has killed
4 million civilians, and the whole world
stands back and does nothing," he said.
While he is in the United States, Rusesaba-
gina is speaking at universities, colleges and
high schools across the country.
In his closing remarks, he implored
students to remember the events of the
Rwandan genocide and act when they
have the opportunity to stop human rights
violations.
"Ladies and gentlemen, men and women
like Wallenberg are very few, but we need
them," he said. "Among you, all of you, you
might be the Raoul Wallenberg, and yet you
do not know it. Many of you have a mis-
sion, and yet you do not know it. Tonight I
urge you, each and all of you, to be a Wal-
lenberg."

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COLUMBUS
Continued from page 1
in representing and honoring a man that
destroyed and devastated a people's cul-
ture," Marino said.
She added that while Columbus
brought Western Europe and the
cultures of the Americas into con-
tact, the encounter was exploitative,
resulting in the deaths of millions of
native peoples.
"It wasn't like he came here, and the
civilization was combined like a big
happy family," Marino said. "He made
slavery (and) rape happen, too."
But John Salamone, the executive
director of the National Italian Ameri-
can Foundation, defended the holiday.
"I want to emphasize that Colum-
bus Day represents two worlds coming
together. I believe that the majority
of people feel that bringing these two
worlds together is positive for man-
kind," he said.

Salamone added that although some
Italian Americans take pride in the holi-
day because Columbus was a Genoan
sailor, the day should not belong to any
specific ethnic group.
Although most states still recognize
Columbus Day, some lawmakers are
working to also commemorate the con-
tributions of native peoples by creating
a national holiday for them.
U.S. Rep. Joe Baca (D-Calif.)
introduced legislation in February
2005 that would establish a Native
American Day; the legislation is
pending in the House of Represen-
tatives, Baca spokesman Michael
Levin said.
But Marino said as long as the public
continues to celebrate the holiday, the
American people are tacitly condoning
racism.
"I think it's important to recognize
that while so many people think that
Columbus is amazing, in terms of how
our nation is built, it's still based in rac-
ism and hatred."

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MINOR
Continued from page 1
The University has long taught class-
es similar to Fox's. RC Prof. Richard
Mann taught a class called "Intro to
Peace Studies" in the late 1980s, and
the history of nonviolence courses at the
University goes even further back than
that. But there has been a resistance to
making nonviolence studies a major or
even a minor.
Political Science Prof. David Singer
said he's given his full support to Trav-
ers's idea, though he has opposed previ-
ous attempts to establish a peace studies
concentration.
"My basic opposition is that I don't
like majors that get too narrow of a
focus," Singer said. "I want my students
to get a broad education and then within
that broad area, focus on something."
He added that disciplines as focused
as peace studies tend to attract students
with similar beliefs. But he said the
emergence of a political climate that
condones using violence to resolve
problems has led him to change his
mind.
"It's still not a great idea pedagogical-
ly, but I think the political motivations
outweigh that now," Singer said.
Another concern professors raised
at last week's meeting was that stu-
dents who graduate with such a nar-
row focus will not be able to find jobs.
But prof. Michael Nagler, a Peace and
Conflict Studies professor at Univer-
sity of California at Berkeley, said
the majority of his students go into
nonprofit work, human rights orga-
nizations or health care. Many of his
students go overseas with organiza-
tions such as the Peace Corps.
"We're not going to survive unless we
learn the arts of peace," Nagler said.
Berkeley's well-established peace and
conflict studies department has been in

existence since 1985 and graduates 30
to 40 students each year. Nagler said he
was excited to hear about the possibility
of a program at the University, even if it
was just a minor.
"You take it one step at a time,"
Nagler said. "You build something, and
once you find out that it doesn't bite and
it doesn't cost 10 million dollars a year,
you go from there."
Fox said a minor is certainly fea-
sible, and she is willing to put in the
time it will take to complete the nec-
essary administrative work. If the
minor is sponsored by the Residential
College - which RC Prof. Charlie
Bright said is certainly a possibility
- it needs to be approved by the RC
curriculum planning committee. The
sponsoring faculty members would
then need permission from all of the
departments that would offer classes
in the new program.
Departments with courses in non-
violent studies would most likely
include political science, religion,
english, history and art history,
among others. After gaining permis-
sion from the departments, the poten--
tial minor would need to be taken
to the LSA curriculum committee
before being posted as a minor.
Fox said she is not yet prepared for
the additional work of creating a non-
violence studies major. But Phil Hanlon,
associate provost and chair of the Task-
force on Multidisciplinary Studies, said
that it might be the kind of program that
could be sponsored by the taskforce.
"It's a little hard to tell outside the
context of a specific proposal," Hanlon
said. "What we're looking to support are
large courses and concentrations that
pull from many different areas.
Bright and Hanlon both estimated the
whole process was at least a year away
from completion, but Hanlon said that
was standard for any new program.

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For Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2005
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
You feel sympathetic toward a friend
today. You feel like this person's pain is
your pain. You want to help if you can.
You might join forces with a group or
with other friends to do whatever is pos-
sible.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
You have very high ideals today. You
Kant great things for yourself and for the
world. However, you have to ask your-
self, Am I being realistic?
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
You have a strong desire to escape
somewhere today. You want to be any-
Where but here. You want to fulfill a
secret dream to go somewhere. (If
ishes were horses, beggars would
fide.)
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
You might use your money or posses-
sions to help someone today. You're con-
erned about shared property and other
people's wealth in some way; neverthe-
less, you're also sympathetic about
something.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Relationships are totally confusing
today. Perhaps your expectations are
,nr1ic+;n9 A nn-ir thincr tn lken in

ways to express your talents.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
A family member needs your help
today. Quite possibly, you need help
from others. Either way, this is a good
day to reach out in sympathy to loved
ones.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
You can't help daydreaming today.
Your mind keeps drifting off into other
subjects. You feel very psychically tuned
in to others. (You almost know what
they're thinking.)
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
This is not a good day to make impor-
tant financial decisions. You could give
away the farm. You feel sympathetic and
generous, but you might not be practical
and realistic.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
Today you feel warm and kind toward
others. You easily sympathize with the
pain and suffering that someone is
undergoing. You will help if you can.
(Your prayers and good wishes are
something.)
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
You are definitely in touch with your
psychic self today! The Moon is per-
fectly lined up with your ruler, Neptune.
VnCI JBON TODAv Vn r nersonnl

EARTHQUAKE
Continued from page 1
Yesterday's efforts were hampered by
torrential rains and hail in the mountains
of the Pakistani side of Kashmir, and
crates of supplies sat on tarmacs waiting
to be delivered. At least one U.S. supply
helicopter had to turn around because of
a rainstorm in the mountain passes, the
military said.
"The recovery efforts have been
slowed by bad weather and large parts of
the region are still inaccessible because
landslides have destroyed the road net-
work," a U.N. statement said.
Bob McKerrow, coordinator of relief
efforts for the International Federation
of the Red Cross, said in Islamabad that
17 trucks left for affected areas with
supplies, including blood.
"Some of the roads are just being
reopened and this rain is not going to
help at all," McKerrow said. "And the
possibility of further landslides block-
ing roads is a threat every minute of
the day."

The Pakistani government's official
death toll was about 23,000, but a senior
army official involved in the rescue
operations said that "according to our
assessment, the death toll is between
35,000 to 40,000 people." Tens of thou-
sands were injured.
The official spoke on condition of ano-
nymity because he was not authorized to
talk to the media about the toll. The esti-
mate matched that of local officials.
Neighboring India said 1,300 people
died in its part of Kashmir, the disput-
ed province at the center of two wars
between New Delhi and Islamabad.
India planned to send a planeload of
food, tents and medicine to its longtime
rival in what was seen as a boost to the
peace process between the two nuclear-
armed neighbors. Islamabad, however,
refused India's offer of helicopters.
One of the places hardest-hit b) the
quake was Muzaffarabad, the capital of
Pakistani-controlled Kashmir, where
most homes and all government build-
ings were destroyed. Bodies were still
in the streets.

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HENDRIX
Continued from page 1
didates on Sept. 15 - the day after the
drunken driving complaint was issued
- Kilpatrick told the audience that he

being faced by his opponent's son.
"The mayor is giving him his con-
sideration as a father and a husband,"
Quiett said.
A not-guilty plea was entered for
Stephen Hendrix in the drunken driv-

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