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September 28, 2005 - Image 2

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, September 28, 2005

NATION/WORLD

I

AP PHOTO
Above is an undated two-image combo released by the U.S. Army yesterday of Abdullah Abu Azzam, top aide
to the al-Qalda leader, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi.
Coalition forces kill No

2 Iraqi a
Terrorist group
denies that slain man
was a top leader
BAGHDAD (AP) - U.S. and Iraqi
authorities said yesterday their forces had
killed the No. 2 official of the Iraqi al-
Qaida during in a weekend raid in Bagh-
dad, claiming to have struck a "painful
blow" to the country's most feared insur-
gent group.
Abdullah Abu Azzam led al-Qaida's
operations in Baghdad, planning a brutal
wave of suicide bombings in the capital
since April, killing hundreds of people,
officials said.
According to an Associated Press
tally, 698 people have been killed and
1,579 have been wounded since April 1
in suicide attacks in Baghdad.
He also controlled the finances for for-
eign fighters that flowed into Iraq to join
the insurgency.
Abu Azzam, who a government
spokesman said was an Iraqi, was the top
deputy to Jordanian militant Abu Musab
al-Zarqawi. Abu Azzam was on a list of
Iraq's 29 most-wanted insurgents issued
by the U.S. military in February and had
a bounty of $50,000 on his head.
AI-Qaida in Iraq denied that Abu
Azzam was the No. 2 leader of the orga-
nization and said "it was not confirmed"

-Qalda official

that he was killed. "Abu Azzam was one
of al-Qaida's many soldiers and is the
leader of one of its battalions operating in
Baghdad," the group said in an Internet
statement by its spokesman, Abu May-
sara al-Iraqi.
It called the U.S. and Iraqi claims that
he was the group's top deputy "a futile
attempt ... to raise the morale of their
troops."
A suicide bomber attacked Iraqis
applying for jobs as policemen Today
in Baqouba, 30 miles north of Baghdad,
killing nine and wounding 21.
The U.S. military also said a Marine
was killed yoday by a roadside bomb in
the town of Khaldiyah, west of Baghdad.
The death brought to 1,918 the number of
U.S. troops who have died since the Iraq
war started in 2003, according to an AP
count.
Police found the bodies of 22 Iraqi
men who had been shot to death in
southern Iraq, many of them bound
and blindfolded, said Maj. Felah
Al-Mohammedawi of the Interior
Ministry. Their identities were not
immediately known.
It was not immediately clear what
effect Abu Azzam's death would have
on al-Qaida in Iraq, which has been one
of the deadliest militant groups, car-
rying out suicide attacks that targeted
the country's Shiite majority. The U.S.

military has claimed to have killed or
captured leading al-Zarqawi aides in the
past and attacks have continued unabated
- although Abu Azzam appeared to be
a more significant figure.
Air Force Gen. Richard Myers, chair-
man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said the
killing of Abu Azzam would force insur-
gents "to go to the bench and find some-
body that is probably less knowledgeable
and less qualified."
"It's like fighting the al-Qaida net-
work. It will have some impact, but over
time they will replace people," Myers
said at the Pentagon.
Iraqi government spokesman Laith
Kubba called the killing of Abu Azzam
a "painful blow" to al-Qaida, but warned
that the group would likely carry out
revenge attacks.
Abu Azzam was killed early Sunday
when U.S. and Iraqi forces raided a high-
rise apartment building in Baghdad,
Lt. Col. Steve Boylan, a U.S. military
spokesman, told the AP.
"They went in to capture him, he did
not surrender, and he was killed in the
raid," Boylan said.
The Iraqi and U.S. forces targeted
the building after a tip from an Iraqi
citizen, Kubba said. During the raid,
the troops captured another militant
in the apartment with Abu Azzam,
Kubba said.

Israel
moves
against
Hamas
Likud's victory does
not guarantee Sharon
will stay in party
JERUSALEM (AP) - Prime
Minister Ariel Sharon's narrow defeat
of a challenge within his Likud Party
gave him time to decide his political
future, but he may still bolt the party
if it refuses to support his political
program, an adviser said Yesterday.
Israel pressed ahead Yesterday
with its offensive against Palestin-
ian militants yesterday and Defense
Minister Shaul Mofaz said the army
would attack them relentlessly to
force them to stop firing rockets at
Israeli towns.
Tensions in the region were fur-
ther inflamed when Hamas mili-
tants released a video of a bound and
blindfolded Israeli businessman who
they had kidnapped and later killed
- an attack that appeared to signal
a new tactic in the militants' fight
against Israel.
The flare-up in violence had been
expected to harm Sharon's chances
in Monday's vote in the Likud central
committee, where party hard-liners
hoped to punish Sharon for his with-
drawal from the Gaza Strip.
Sharon prevailed with a slim mar-
gin. His allies had said that if he lost,
he might leave Likud, call early elec-
tions and run as head of a new cen-
trist party.
Sharon might still bolt the party if
it refuses to back his major policies,
said Lior Horev, Sharon's political
adviser.
"Either the party stands behind
him, or he has to choose a differ-
ent way in order to push forward his
agenda," Horev said.
Sharon's main rival, Benjamin
Netanyahu, insisted he would pre-
vail in party primaries next year by
tapping into the deep vein of anger
among party members who feel the
prime minister betrayed Likud's
nationalist roots.
Foreign Minister Silvan Shalom,
who backed Sharon in the vote, said
he advised the prime minister to
work to heal the bitter divisions in
the party.
"Today everything needs to be
done to unite the ranks," Shalom told
Israel TV. "It's crucial to try to keep
everyone together."
Renewed fighting with the Pal-
estinians in Gaza over the past
week has compounded Sharon's
political problems. Hamas militants
launched dozens of homemade Qas-
sam rockets at southern Israel over
the weekend, prompting a major
Israeli offensive, marked by air-
strikes in Gaza and arrest raids in
the West Bank.
Israel fired live artillery shells into
the northern Gaza Strip on yesterday
in what Israeli security officials said
was a symbolic act to warn Palestin-
ian militants to halt their attacks on
Israelis.

WASHINGTON
Brown blames others for failures
Former FEMA director Michael Brown blamed others for most government
failures in responding to Hurricane Katrina yesterday, especially Louisiana Gov.
Kathleen Blanco and New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin. He aggressively defended
his own role, yesterday.
Brown also said that in the days before the storm, he expressed his con-
cerns that "this is going to be a bad one" in phone conversations and e-mails
with President Bush, White House chief of staff Andy Card and deputy chief
of staff Joe Hagin.
He also blames the Department of Homeland Security for not acquiring better
equipment ahead of the storm.
His efforts to shift blame drew sharp criticism from Democratic and Republican
lawmakers alike.
"I'm happy you left," said Rep. Christopher Shays, (R-Conn.) "That kind of look
in the lights like a deer tells me you weren't capable of doing that job."
Rep. Gene Taylor, (D-Miss.), told Brown: "The disconnect was, people thought
there was some federal expertise out there. There wasn't. Not from you."
NEW ORLEANS
City's police chief resigns after 26 years
Police Superintendent Eddie Compass resigned yesterday after four turbulent
weeks in which the police force was wracked by desertions and disorganization in
Hurricane Katrina's aftermath.
"I served this department for 26 years and have taken it through some of the
toughest times of its history. Every man in a leadership position must know when
it's time to hand over the reins," Compass said at a news conference. "I'll be going
on in another direction that God has for me."
As the city slipped into anarchy during the first few days after Katrina, the
1,700-member police department itself suffered a crisis. Many officers deserted
their posts, and some were accused of joining in the looting that broke out. Two
officers Compass described as friends committed suicide.
Neither Compass nor Mayor Ray Nagin would say whether Compass was pres-
sured to resign.
LAKE CHARLES, Louisiana
Bush travels to Gulf Coast to view damage
President Bush flew over the largely obliterated Louisiana town of Cameron and
circled an offshore oil rig yesterday in his first up-close look at the devastation that
Hurricane Rita brought to the Gulf Coast's oil producing and refining communities.
"This area's hurting," Bush said before an hour-long helicopter tour over the
debris-strewn communities along the Texas-Louisiana border where Rita blew
ashore. "I saw firsthand how it's hurting."
Bush saw flattened and flooded homes, hundreds of downed trees, extensive roof
damage and dozens of stranded and wandering cows. He flew over utility towers
that had been knocked over, a Blockbuster video store with windows knocked into
the parking lot, a power company worker making repairs and a riverboat washed
halfway up onto muddy ground.
NEW YORK
Greenspan: Economy endurighigh oil prices
Stocks closed mostly higher yesterday after Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greens-
pan said the economy has weathered the increase in oil prices "reasonably well.
Earlier in the session, stocks fell after consumer confidence hit its lowest point
in two years, raising fears that U.S. shoppers might cut their spending and slow the
economy.
But Greenspan calmed investors by emphasizing "the incredible resilience of
te U.S. economy in terms of flexibility," said Lynn Reaser, chief economist for the
investment strategy group at Bank of America.

_ .:1V A- :o

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NEWS IN BRIEF
HED E FR ARUN T

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- Compiled from Daily wire reports

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DON'T FORGET!

RESUME SUBMISSION DEADLINE IS OCTOBER 10, 2005

CORRECTIONS
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