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September 07, 2005 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2005-09-07

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, September 7, 2005 - 7A

HURRICANE
Continued from page 1A
of Katrina, said Fowler.
As far as grants for tuition and housing,
Fowler said her office is awaiting direction
from the admissions office on the students'
financial and residency status.
Although some of the students were able
to secure housing with friends or family
in the area, University of Housing spokes-
man Alan Levy said his office is working
closely with undergraduate admissions to
ensure that all the displaced students have
a place to live.
And despite almost-full residence halls, Levy
said he is confident the University can provide
on-campus housing for the new students.
"So far we have met the demand - we have
placed seven undergraduate students and one
graduate student," he said. He added that even
if on-campus housing becomes full, additional
guest students would have a home, as several
local landlords and community members have
volunteered off-campus housing.
Yet some displaced students may have
" a harder time finding academic placement
because of the nature of their studies. At
the Medical School, administrators said
they had received inquiries but did not
admit any displaced students at the direc-
tion of the Association of American Medi-
cal Colleges, a group that serves medical
schools across the country.
"The deans of the schools involved and the
AAMC have requested that nobody admit
FBI
Continued from page 1A
tation of the surveillance of the organization.
"We're a group for social justice and are
absolutely not terrorists," she said.
. The documents the ACLU received did not
indicate if investigations of Michigan's advo-
cacy groups were ongoing.
The state police press release claimed the
information on the advocacy groups discussed
at the terrorism symposium was obtained
from public sources such as websites and
newspaper articles.
But Julie Hartman, a sociology gradu-
ate student at Michigan State University
and former advisor to the East Lansing
Animal Rights Movement, which was
also named at the symposium, said that
only through covert methods could such
specific information about her organiza-
tion be discovered.
"Since the (FBI) document estimates 12 to
15 people were in the group, somebody had
to come to a protest or meeting since our list
server pointed to upwards of 40 members,"
she said.
Hartman described the now-defunct group
as having only two or three "circus protests,"
where approximately 12 people handed out
leaflets and held up signs.
"I was disappointed in that there are better
- OLE
Continued from page 1A
actions, Eddie Bauer denied responsibil-
ity for the money owed, and Perdana was
reported as financially unable to make the
payment.
"Eddie Bauer is just leaving these work-
ers high and dry," Rahman said. Peterson
said that while the University does not
have any business with Eddie Bauer, the
University's Standing Committee on Labor
Standards and Human Rights would exam-
ine the school's relationship with the FLA
this year.
"The things that were of concern ... were
not happening while Michigan materials
were being manufactured. The concerns are
actually over the relationship between the
University and the Fair Labor Association,"

medical students simply because they want
this to be a coordinated rather than chaotic
process," said Executive Associate Dean
James Woolliscroft.
He added that because most biomedical
graduate students work on very specific proj-
ects, they would need to be placed in a lab
conducting similar research to continue their
studies, further limiting the Medical School's
ability to accept displaced students.
Still, to do their part, the Department of
Emergency at the University of Michigan
Health System is trying to organize medical
teams to travel to New Orleans.
"We are part of a statewide effort to iden-
tify medical volunteers to staff a medical
center in the Gulf region," said Peter Forster,
chief administrator for the Department of
Emergency.
He added that 250 members of the hospital
and Medical School staff are volunteering to
go south for up to two weeks at a time.
But the volunteers must await federal
direction before they can begin relief
work, said Forster.
"As of right now we don't know what to
do or where they would go," he said.
Administrators said the higher educa-
tion community is responding to the disas-
ter the best it can.
"Tulane University is very pleased to
have the colleges around the country open-
ing their doors to any of the students who
would like to apply. It's one of the things
that is very gratifying about what we do,"
said Spencer.
things for police to be doing. We are at a large
university where sexual assault and other
crimes are occurring. We were just a group
advocating for change," she said.
Ben Royal, a second-year graduate stu-
dent and campus advisor of BAMN, said
he also felt his rights were violated by the
surveillance.
"(BAMN) stands up for educational oppor-
tunities, for black and minority educational
equity and for that to be a reason to single us
out is completely unacceptable," he said.
LSA junior Brandon Adkins, who is
also a web designer for the conservative
campus group Young Americans for Free-
dom, said the investigation on BAMN for
terrorist ties was not surprising and pos-
sibly even warranted.
"The name says it all," he said, refer-
ring to BAMN. "It's not like they are try-
ing to hide the tactics. It doesn't seem laws
and proper ways of doing things are any
restraint to their actions."
Sara McDonald, a member of Direct
Action, said the news of surveillance of her
group has not diminished support in the
organization, but has instead galvanized
the effort.
"If anything, it has re-energized people,
and now people are more angry and more
passionate than before to fight for what they
believe in," McDonald said.
Peterson said.
Peterson added that the labor committee
resumes meetings soon, and while relations
with the FLA and similar organizations such
as the Worker Rights Consortium will be on
the agenda, there is no specific timeframe for
a decision on SOLE's concerns.
The letter given to Coleman requested that
she respond by Friday, yet Peterson said she
was unsure whether Coleman would be able
to do so.
SOLE member Ashley Marie Aidenbaum
said the task to stop unjust treatment of workers
must start with students and then work up to the
University, the FLA and lastly, Eddie Bauer.
"The responsibility falls to the students to
blow the whistle on this," Marie said. "It all
comes down to us right now."
The group began the sit-in at 1 p.m. and
continued for a few hours. Peterson said the
protest was "quite peaceful."

TREVOR CAMPBELL/ Daily
Jesse Levine talks about the work of MSA representative Stuart Wagner shortly after the announcement of his resignation at the MSA meet-
ing on Tuesday.

MSA
Continued from page 1A
the student government.
During his time on MSA, Wagner was seen as
one of the most vocal and visual members of the
assembly.
In July, Wagner protested a bill before the Ann
Arbor City Council that he said it forced unjust lim-
its on students by presenting the City Council with
ear-plugs as a gift to symbolize his feeling that the
council members were not listening to students.
MSA General Counsel Russ Garber expressed
disappointment to Wagner's resignation.

"We respect that Stu is doing what makes
him happy, not what we feel he should do,"
Garber said.
Wagner said his hope in stepping down is that he
can really accomplish something with his commis-
sion, and motivate others to follow his example.
'"My message is, if you're not going to do any-
thing on the assembly, you should step down. I just
feel like I could be doing more as a commission
chair," Wagner said.
RC senior Ryan Bates, chair of the Peace and
Justice Commission, said Wagner would be missed
by the assembly.
Levine thanked Wagner for his time and devo-

tion to MSA, and told the assembly that he had
changed the institution for the better.
"(Wagner) has put in his best effort, 10-fold,"
Levine said.
MSA Rep. Arielle Linsky said Wagner's resig-
nation was a great loss to the assembly, and that
she regretted that she couldn't change his mind
about resigning.
"Stu has been an amazing asset to MSA," Lin-
sky said.
Stu said that he had no regrets about his
involvement with the assembly, but that he
really felt that it was time to do something
different to improve the culture on campus.

AAPD
Continued from page 1A
Julie Stadelman, property manager
from Ann Arbor Realty, Inc., said that
though the main entrances in their
properties are equipped with automatic
locks, these doors are often propped
open by students.
"There's more propping doors in the
fall, mainly because people are moving
in," Stadelman said.
But not all apartment complexes
have automatic locks. LSA Junior
Jennifer Bischoff said that the main
entrance to her apartment building is
supposed to be locked at all times, but
the door doesn't close all the way and
does not lock.
She said the buildings around the city
that aren't securely locked are a result
of a lack of upkeep, a problem in a city
full of inexpensive student housing.
"When things are run down, it invites
intruders," she said.
In addition to the police department's
efforts to encourage locked doors, the
department also hopes to promote the
use of 9-1-1 in reporting suspicious
behavior, not just in emergency situa-

tions.
Oates said students often don't think
to call 9-1-1 when they should. "We
have a small criminal underclass that
preys on students," he said. "There are
people who get away with these crimes
because no one picks up the phone and
calls us."
But some students said they feel
uncomfortable contacting the authori-
ties about people they see loitering
around their property. Bischoff said she
saw some people hanging around her
apartment while she was moving in but
did not think to call 9-1-1 because she
only saw them during that one day.
"If I saw someone consistently, I
would let the management company
(for my apartment building) know
first," she said.
But Oates stressed the rapid nature of
a theft. "They'll walk in unchallenged
to a communal residence and look for
open doors, steal wallets, iPods, purses
and be gone in no time at all."
Oates said he is hopeful about the
new campaign and its effects on the
city's crime rates. "The message is real
simple: We're a very safe town, but we
do have crime."

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