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September 22, 2005 - Image 7

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily -'

Thursday, September 22, 2005 - 7A

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 22, 2005 - 7A

GOOGLE
Continued from page 1
Lessig agreed with Google and its inter-
pretation of copyright law.
"Technically, copyright law states
that if you make of copy of a work, that
you need to obtain permission from the
author," Lessig said. However, he said it
is important to recognize what Google
is attempting to accomplish by digitizing
works and enhancing public access.
Lessig said the ultimate use of the
database would not compete with com-
mercial interests of the publishers and
authors and therefore Google's use of
copyrighted works falls under the fair
use doctrine.
An example, Lessig said, would be
when parts of a book are copied for a
book review, allowing for public cri-
tique of a work. Lessig said Google's
library project falls under the same realm
because it provides information to the
general public that would otherwise not
be readily available.
DETROIT
Continued from page 1.
ty also spent about $300,000 to renovate
and equip the space, which was formerly
a restaurant. The provost's office contrib-
uted about half of the $520,000 cost.
At yesterday's opening reception, Regent
Martin Taylor (D-Grosse Pointe Farms)
and former Provost Paul Courant stressed
that the center was a long time coming.
Coleman agreed, but added, "I think
we had to get to a stage where all the stars
were aligned. I also think you have to do
it right."
Deans of various colleges were the first
to suggest the center to the central admin-
istration five years ago, Coleman said.
The center will benefit both the Uni-
versity and the city, said Charlene Turner,
president of the Michigan Neighborhood
partnership, which addresses human
needs in Detroit and Dearborn.
Anderson said some people in the city
look at the University as an ivory tower,
adding that the reverse is also true.
"There's a perception that Detroit's
unreachable, like it's a different coun-
try," Anderson said. "The center will be
a more visible presence."

TRANSIT
Continued from page 1
Palombo also said this region is espe-
cially in need of mass transit because
of the large numbers of students and
employees who may not have access to
individual automobiles. He said within
the Southeastern region of Michigan,
there are 10 universities, with more than
100,000 combined students. He also
pointed out that 1,800 people work at the
Detroit Metro Airport and could be using
public transportation to get to work.
But Kolb said it is difficult to pass a
bill that creates a mass transit authority.
"You're changing the status quo. There is
not unanimous support for mass transit,"
he said.
State Rep. Leon Drolet (R-Clinton
Township) said he has no problem with
the coordination of already existing tran-
sit systems, but opposes the extension of a
transit system, which he believes no one
will use. He said very few of his constitu-
ents use mass transit, and it would not an

efficient use of tax dollars. "Mass transit
is very effective and worthwhile for cities
that are densely packed, but it's too late
for metro Detroit," Drolet said. "Most of
the people who live in my district don't
work in metro Detroit anymore."
Still, Kolb said that people will use
the transit system, citing the high price
of gasoline as an incentive. "Every major
metropolitan region in this country has
a mass transit system. We want to be a
world-class state and a world-class city,
then we need a world-class transportation
network, and that's what DARTA helps to
build."
LSA freshman Marissa Gerber said
she would use public transportation if it
wasn't too costly. "I would probably use it
to go to the airport or concerts. You could
go see attractions like Greektown. I think
it would be useful," she said.
Public Health student Rachel
Ross agreed. "I'm an out-
of-state student, so I don't
have a car. It would be a great way to get
to the airport and to actually see Detroit."

COME OUT
Continued from page 1
universities - typically dominated
by left-wing intellectuals - cre-
ate hostile environments for these
students in which to express their
views. That's why we are encourag-
ing students to "come out" and not
be ashamed of their beliefs."
Many students who attended the
event were enthusiastic about voic-
ing their opinions and identifying
themselves as conservatives.
"Amidst all this liberal propagan-
da ... I think if you voice your opin-
ion, especially as a conservative, you
feel ostracized," LSA junior Jason
Reinglass said.
Many students said they felt
relieved after participating in the
event and were glad to find other
students who shared their political
opinions.
"It would be great if we could all
come out freely without being tar-
gets of aggression from liberals,"
LSA junior Kim Peters said. "I think

this will help because people will
see that there are other people with
them."
Allison Kasic, campus services
coordinator for Campus Leadership
Program, voiced her hopes regard-
ing the outcome of the day's events
and how it would affect students and
conservative student groups.
"Ideally, we'd like to live in a
world where everyone's political
beliefs are respected, but at many
colleges where most of the profes-
sors are liberal Democrats, it's up to
these students to stand up for their
beliefs and spread the word," Kasic
said.
LSA junior Brandon Adkins, who
is the website designer for YAF, also
had high hopes about the outcome of
this event.
"This is just the beginning,"
Adkins said. "From here on out,
it's in the hands of the students who
participated. It's up to them to start
expressing their views with other
students."
Adkins also stressed the purpose

of the event as an opportunity to
encourage awareness as opposed to
creating negative feelings.
"This day isn't really about try-
ing to show the world that the Uni-
versity has a liberal bias; it's really
just about showing other people
what you believe in." Adkins said.
"I think conservatives and liberals
alike should take this (event) in open
arms and embrace this."
With a total of seven schools par-
ticipating, the state of Michigan had
the most schools involved in the
event nationwide. Ultimately, the
day was a success, according to the
event coordinators, with nearly 200
University students signing up to
receive more information about con-
servative groups on campus.
This event kicked off a series of
national activism events that the
Campus Leadership Program has
planned for the near future.
In the upcoming months, a
National Sovereignty Day, as well as
a Save Christmas Campaign, are in
the works.

At yesterday's opening reception,
though, homeless people walking just
outside of the center down Woodward
Avenue provided a stark contrast to the
University faculty, administrators and
students dining on refined food and talk-
ing about the difference they would make
in the lives of Detroit citizens.
Detroit was recently ranked the poor-
est city in the country by a U.S. Census
Bureau report. More than a third of its
residents live under the poverty level.
Johnson said everyone in Detroit
should be granted two things at birth:
a birth certificate and a certificate of
hope from the University because of the
opportunities it offers.
School of Education senior Kaellen
Weld-Wallis was born in Detroit. She
maintains a realistic view of the city's
poverty and its problems, but said the Uni-
versity could help its residents solve them.
"The times are hard, and therefore
the timing is perfect," Weld-Wallis said.
"There is hope for my home."
Coleman said the physical presence
of the University in the city will also aid
recruiting and increase applications from
residents of the city, calling the center a
"great recruiting tool."

Building the center is part of a push to
globalize the University, Coleman said. The
efforts also included Coleman's delegation
to China last summer, which established
partnerships with Chinese universities,
and the Michigan in Washington program,
which encourages undergraduates to spend
a semester in Washington D.C.
Coleman said globalization is especially
important post-Hurricane Katrina.
"(The hurricane) is a distressing but crit-
ical example of why University of Michi-
gan students should be in our major cities,
studying, researching, and being immersed
in the many ways the government, the pri-
vate sector and non-profit organizations
address the issues that figuratively and lit-
erally affect our lives," she said.
Other property the University owns in
the city includes the Detroit Admissions
Office, the Legal Assistance for Urban
Communities office that the law school
owns and the Detroit Rackham Build-
ing, which has been leased to Wayne
State University since the early 1990s.
The University leased Rackham to WSU
because it did not have any use for it, and
did not want to pay to renovate the 60-
year-old building, University spokesman
Joel Serwach said.

AEPHI
Continued from page 1
new group. The speaker - who intro-
duced herself as a former AEPhi sister
- made it clear that PHI is not associ-
ated with Panhel, but that women were
encouraged to join in order to "carry on

the tradition of AEPhi."
Wunsch said if she had been consult-
ed by the former AEPhi members, she
would "never, ever have granted them
permission to start this society."
If the sorority does re-form on cam-
pus, the girls who were once in the chap-
ter will not be readmitted. "The national

organization will be recruiting a whole
new set of girls," Fediuk said.
Wunsch added that if any of the
organizers of Monday's event were
in the group that was granted alumna
status when AEPhi was shut down
last year, "their status will now be in
jeopardy."

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