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September 19, 2005 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2005-09-19

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Monday, September 19, 2005 - 7A

HANDS
Continued from page 1A
thing ... let's not kill, let's work
with our fellow human being."
Also sponsoring the event
was the Megiddo Peace Project,
which Haber founded.
The project is aiming to
stage a two-week "International
Art for Peace Festival" using
Haber's carpentry and other
art and music. Haber created
the group with his wife, Odile
Hugonot Haber.
"The Megiddo Project is a
continuation of (Students for a
Democratic Society)," Haber
said.
Haber added that there needs
to be an SDS on campus today
so that students "are learning
how to transform their society."
the michigan

BUDGET
Continued from page IA
is actually a 1.3-percent decrease from
this year's original allocation.
"If you look from one year to the
next, our base appropriation has been
declining four years in a row," Peter-
son said. "It's important for people to
see that big picture - this is part of an
ongoing series of cuts."
Former University Provost Paul Cou-
rant commented on the -budget alloca-
tion in a presentation to the University
Board of Regents in July:
"Another perspective on the past
four years comes from comparing the
state appropriation with what it would
have been had it merely kept pace with
inflation in consumer prices. In 2002,
the appropriation was $363 million.
Had it kept pace with inflation, in 2006
it would be $396 million," he said.
At a regents meeting last Thurs-
daily Jt

day, University President Mary Sue
Coleman commented on the decrease
in funding: "This is about what we
expected, and what we planned for in
the University budgeting process this
year. Of course, my hope is that there
will be some progress toward more
predictable and robust levels of support
in the future. "This continues to be a
challenging situation," Coleman said.
Peterson said there is no chance of a
cancellation of the approximately $1,000
tuition hike approved by the regents in July.
While the Senate's floor-funding plan
would not affect the University, which
already receives $8,104 per student,
Universities such as Grand Valley, Oak-
land and Saginaw Valley would receive
more funding in the hopes of lessening
the disparity between appropriations
for different colleges in Michigan.
Senator Mike Goschka (R-Brandt),
a member of the Senate Appropriations
Higher Education Subcommittee snid

the original difference between schools
that were well funded and schools that
weren't was unacceptable. "We felt it was
important to say that regardless of where
you go to school in this state there should
be a minimum amount of state dollars
that would go to support any of our 15
public universities," Goschka said. Dur-
ing the current fiscal year, Wayne State
University receives $8,665 per student
while Grand Valley receives $3,072.
University Vice President for Govern-
ment Relations Cynthia Wilbanks said
the state government has been working
hard to support higher education.
"This is the fourth year that the state
has been struggling vitally with an eco-
nomic downturn, and there are realities
that are associated with that," she said.
"I do think the governor is completely
aware of the importance of higher edu-
cation. It's the stress and strain of the
economic conditions that don't allow
for a better outcome."

COHEN
Continued from page 1A
action by supporting the Michigan
Civil Rights Initiative. MCRI is a
state ballot initiative that aims to end
the use of affirmative action in Michi-
gan.
"(Cohen is) unusually courageous
to talk about affirmative action," said
panelist and RC alum Forde-Mazrui.
"People that oppose it are often called
racist."
Although Cohen does not shy away
from controversial positions, Cohn,
one of the panelists at the event, said
many faculty members ask themselves,
'Will I get in trouble for this?' before
openly articulating certain viewpoints.
"There's a tremendous fear on campus
to be labeled politically incorrect,"
agreed a member of the audience.
"On the surface, we are free," Cohen
said. "But there are pressures of conven-
tion at the University that make people
not speak out (about) some views."
But some audience members argued
that faculty members should abstain

from voicing their opinions in order to
maintain their objectivity in class. Pan-
elists also debated if free speech should
be allowed if it might offend members
of the public.
Wayne State University Law School
Dean Frank Wu said the rubric for
approriate free speech is not if it offends
the public. Instead Wu said approri-
ate free speech would aim to create
dialogue between people of opposing
viewpoints.
A founder of the Residential College,
Cohen embodies the RC's commitment to
debate and open dialogue, Regester said.
Two hundred and twenty three stu-
dent members of a Facebook group
"RC, The Residential College - the
Best Thing to Happen to U-M Since
Student Activism" seem to agree. They
chose Cohen, as the mascot for their
group, because he represents what the
RC stands for.
Regester said, "Carl's not afraid to
take controversial positions. He encour-
ages engaging controversy. The RC
definitely supports that, because we all
learn through it."

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CAMPUS CLEANERS: PROF. Dry Clean-
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University next to Campus Rental. 662-1906.
THESIS EDITING. LANGUAGE, organiza-
tion, format. All disciplines. 25 yrs. exp.
996-0566 or wvriteon@htdconnect com
TOP LINE ENGLISH lessons: first one free.
Credentialed teacher: 20 yrs. exp. All levels.
Call Ruth Crawford @ 734.997.8890.
WISE HEALTHCARE CHOICE. 4 treat-
ments and evaluation $75. Chiropractic Dr.,
30 yrs. experience. Call 734.994.5966.

WORK STUDY POSITIONS are avail. at
Kresge Hearing Research Institute for people
looking to apply to work-study award in com-
puter related areas. Email dcr@umich.edu

LEVIN
Continued from page 1A
mance is not matched by the administra-
tion's in Washington."
After speaking for about one hour,
Levin took questions from the audience.
One audience member accused Levin of
dishonesty, saying, "Please don't lie to us;
own up to the truth." The senator respond-
ed indignantly, insisting that all of his facts
were verified in the 9/11 Commission

Report and other government documents.
Several students said they attended
because they were supporters of Senator
Levin or the Democrats, but had mixed
reactions to his speech. Echoing what has
been a frequent complaint about the Dem-
ocratic Party, LSA sophomore Matt Feld-
man, said Levin illustrated the problems
but "didn't really offer any solutions."
- Daily staff reporter Christina
Hildreth contributed to this report.

!!!BARTENDER TRAINEES!!! $300 a day
potential, Age 18+ ok. No experience neces-
sary, training provided. 800-965-6520 x 125.
$$$ DISTRIBUTORS WANTED for Michi-
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Mike 1.800.369.PINS (7467).
$9.00/HR. MICHIGAN TELEFUND is now
hiring. Awesome Resume Builder! Apply on-
line: www.telefund.umich.edu or 763-4400.
CONTRIBUTE TO SCIENCEI
AND ARN $100 !

L ehav Sci. IRB#: HUMOOOOO649,IRB Approval Dac: 7131/05.
AlTENTION U OF M Students!
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your own schedule, sales/customer service,
conditions exist, all ages 18+ may apply, call
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ATTRACTIVE FEMALE MODELS for
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Must be 18. Call (734) 678-4181.
CONTINGENT CAREGIVERS TO work
with woman with MS in Ann Arbor home.
Exp. pref., but will train right person! Day-
time, eve. & wknd. shifts avail. Call (248)
698-4635 or andrealeigh33@yahoo.com
CONTRIBUTE TO SCIENCE and earn
$100! UM freshmen needed to complete 12
surveys (one/week) over the Fall semester
for a study of goals and adjustment to col-
lege. Email goals@umich.edu (preferred) or
call (734) 615-3626. Behav Sci. IRB#:
HUM00000649, IRB Approval Date: 7/31/05.
DOG WALKER $10/HR. Mon. and/or Wed.
around noon. Loc. on Dixboro Rd. next to
UM botanical gardens. Approx. 15 min. from
campus. Car nec. Call Trudy 734-769-7337.
GYMNASTICS INSTRUCTORS NEEDED
For girls & boys beginning classes. Day-
evening-weekend hours. Gymnastics and ex-
perience with children necessary. Gym
America 971-1667.
HELP CREATE A FAMILY
We are looking for egg donors in the Detroit
Metro, Ann Arbor, and Ypsilanti areas.
$4000 compensation to healthy women be-
tween the ages of 20-29 to be anonymous
egg donors. Donors will be evaluated, take
medication, and undergo a minor surgical
procedure. Serious inquiries only. Contact
ARR-Alternative Reproductive Resources at
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MOVIE EXTRAS EARN up to $200 per
day. All looks needed. No experience re-
quired. Call 800-644-8149.

HELP MAKE A Difference With Your
Work-Study Award. America Reads is still
hiring tutors for its 8 am. - 12 noon slots
Mon.-Thurs. You receive training, trans-
portation and support to do one-on one tutor-
ing with students in grades K-3 who are be-
hind in their literacy skills. You need at least
$1,000 award and you need to be avail. either
on Mon., Wed, or Tues., Thurs.
Apply today by going to the website
wvww.umich.edu/~mserve/areads. For further
info., contact Rachel (rrennie@umich.edu).
Immed. interviews, training following wk.
LEARN THE MUSIC BUSINESS...
The Blind Pig in Ann Arbor is looking for an
intern from the U of M student body, 18-22
years old,sthat loves music and going to see
live shows, to help in the booking office.
Knowing your way around Fireworks, Illus-
trator, and Photo Shop is a plus. If inter-
ested, email jason@blindpigmusic.com, with
the subject "Intem."
MARKETING/PROMOTIONS/E VENT
PLANNING INTERNSHIP with
People Magazine. $1000 + incentives.
Apply online at
www.edventurepartners.com/streetteam/
MYSTERY SHOPPERS
Get paid to shop.
Earn up to $150 per day.
Exp. not required.
Call 800 890 0471.
NECTO NIGHT CLUB is seeking Door
Staff, bartenders, barbacks and waitstaff for
employment. Please email:
jon@thenecto.com or call 734-994-5835.
NOW OPEN: QUARTER Bistro Restaurant.
Seeking Restaurant Servers/Host. Servers,
2-3 yrs. professional dining exp. Apply
within, Mon.-Fri., 1-5 p.m. 300 S. Maple.
Call 929-9200.
PiT OR F/T Administrative Assistant/Col-
lege student needed at Farmington Hills law
firm. Motivated applicants e-mail resume
and cover letter to wblaw004@aol.com
PART TIME WORK
Full Time Pay
$14.50 base-appt., ideal for students, flex.
schedules, no experience necessary, sales/ser-
vice, conditions apply, call (734) 994-3804.
SCOREKEEPERS IS HIRING cooks, wait-
resses, and floormen for the summer/upcom-
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schedule and apply today!!
310 Maynard
734.995.0100
SECRET SHOPPERS NEEDED
To Evaluate Local Stores
Restaurants and Theaters
Flexible Hours, Training Provided
E-Mail Required
1-800-585-9024 ext. 6281.
SMART SOCCER PLAYING slacker junior
needs Pioneer H.S. homework tutor for 20
$/hr. E-mail wkuzon@umich.edu
STUDENT JOURNALISTS WANTED
Conduct interviews & write original articles
about UM student life for
AnnArborStudentExchange.com
$10/article. Flexible Schedule. Contact:
brad@fmpublishing.net or 650-575-0598.
WOMEN NEEDED FOR research study:
The Possibilities Project @ the UM School
of Nursing is seeking women between the
ages of 18 & 35 who are currently experienc-
ing any of the following symptoms: binge
eating, vomiting, using laxatives or water

3 WKND. DAYS/MO. and/or 2 morn./wk.
Transportation, responsible. Refs. 769-1462.
A2 FAMILY NEEDS energetic, enthusiastic,
experienced, part-time nanny. Tues., Thurs.
Call 734-395-4223.
CHILD CARE FOR children ages 18 mo. to
3 yrs. Sunday mornings for church from 10 -
11:30. $15/session. Call Lisa Reifert at
734-4340229.
CHILDCARE NEEDED FOR 2 boys, ages 3
yrs. & 15 mos. on Tues. & Thurs. preferably
12-8PM. Must have some toddler care exp.
Ready to start immediately. Send resumes to
tasha@umich.edu
CHILDCARE PROVIDER SOUGHT for 3
1/2 yr. old son of UM Professor and en-
trepreneurial wife. Care in Ann Arbor home
for 10 hrs/wk. @ $10/hr must have car. Call
Cheryl: 327-9993.
EVENING/WEEKEND CHILD CARE
Needed. Must love children, be active, reli-
able, trustworthy, have car. 747-9484. Email
tassavat@comcast.net
EXP. SITTER NEEDED to watch our 2
young children in our Dexter home. 1-2 after-
noons/eves. per wk. Call 734-651-2122.
LOVING, MATURE, RESPONSIBLE
babysitter needed for 3 mo. old daughter &
occas. 6 yr old son. $10/hr., flex. hrs., trans.
required. Non-Smoker. Call 761-8844.
P/f BABYSITTER
Care for 10 month old infant in A2, begin-
ning in September. Requirements: exp. with
infants, strong refs., love of children, non-
smkr. About 10 hrs./wk., days/nights. Call
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P/T BABYSITTER NEEDED in A2. 2-8 hrs.-
/wk. Need Car. 734-761-9322.
P/T NANNY IN South Lyon area, flex. hrs.
& light hse. keeping is a plus. 248-437-4535.

QUITO
Continued from page 1A
"Because (the shower) was right.
next to the clinic, (locals) would pass
by and we would get to meet them,"
Hong said.
"We were reminded of whom we
were working for and if we needed
a hammer, they would run and get it
for us," she said. "I got to contribute
something in a very practical way and
when I left, I knew this facility was
there for them. It was my reward to
know I helped them."
This year, Valsangkar said she aims
to increase the number of participants
to about 50, consisting of physicians
and medical students as well as stu-
dents specializing in construction,
public, health, pharmacy, tutoring and
film and video.
"Our goal is to have enough people
in each discipline (of the project),"
she said.
In addition to maintaining construc-
tion efforts, tutoring and operation of
the health clinic, Valsangkar said she
hopes next summer's participants will
be able to accomplish Quito's ever-
increasing objectives, such as instituting
a girls' leadership program in communi-
ty schools, creating a children's library
and establishing medical records for

patients.
"We don't want to just be a band-
aid - we want to get to the root of the
community's problems," Valsangkar
said. "We want them to eat better, live
in cleaner homes and wipe out the alco-
holism."
LSA junior Lindsey Worcester, who
participated as a tutor in the project,
said while she initially thought the
trip would offer her the opportunity to
improve her fluency in Spanish, in the
end she learned much more.
"I got to spend more one-on-one time
with the children. They are so hardwork-
ing and have such a passion for learning,
it was really inspiring," Worcester said.
"Because they don't have the same edu-
cation opportunities as us, they seem to
value it more."
Worcester added that the children
were very patient in dealing with obsta-
cles created by the language barrier.
"I like to think I helped them a little,
but I think I learned a lot more from the
trip. It really did help open my eyes to
our lifestyle here in the states and all
the material items we value that are not
necessary," she said.
"I think people go into experiences
like this to try and help and impact
others," Worcester said, "but I think I
came out of this much more impacted
by them."

SPRING BREAKERS WANTED
Sun Splash Tours Now Hiring Campus Rep-
resentatives. EARN FREE TRAVEL AND
CASH. FREE MEALS BY 11/7.
www.sunsplashtours.com 1-800-426-7710.
WANTED: WILL BUY single and season
tickets to UM football. Will pay top dollar.
www.mtctickets.com & 866-682-8499.

STILL AVAILABLE!
Pick 1 of 3 beautiful bdrms. in this house lo-
cated just blocks from central campus and
the field area. House comes w/ wshr./dryer,
dwshr., 2 prkg. spots, & a lg. front porch.
This house is also fum. & ready to move in!
Rooms starting @ just $475/mo.
Call Justin @ 734-663-4101.
THE CHURCH @ 1131 Church Street,
Close to UM Campus, 1 month rent offer un-
til 9/20. 3 Bedroom AND Loft. Parking, laun-
dry. $2095, neg. 734-741-5021,
qrjmanagement@comcast.net
ROOMS OR HOUSE near Central/Medical
campuses. Prkg., fum., 248-651-5765.

Apartments Available!

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