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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, March 9, 2005 - 7

PENALTY
Continued from page 1.
collects the bodily fluids that
stream out of the body during
electrocution.
While Kazama hopes ulti-
mately for the end of capital
punishment, he, along with
like-minded Americans, faces
an uphill battle as the death
penalty is supported by Presi-
dent Bush and exists in 38
states.
Proponents of the death pen-
alty say capital punishment
works to deter other crimes,
and a paper by three Emory
University economists states
they have found proof in their
research to support this claim.
According to their research,
each time an execution takes
place, there are 18 fewer mur-
ders.
LSA senior Eric Weiler said
he advocates the death penalty
in order to punish offenses
and discourage other crimes
- even for those under 18. He
also said he thinks each state
should have the right to decide
if they want capital punishment
or not.
"It's an issue of federalism,"
said Weiler.

Although Weiler said he
supports the death penalty for
crimes committed by teenag-
ers as young as 15, and in some
cases 14, he said he thinks cases
should be based on high lev-
els of evidence, such as DNA,
when deciding who should be
punished by death.
"I think the death penalty should
be reserved for the most heinous
types of murder," he said.
Unlike Weiler, LSA fresh-
man Monica Mendoza said she
is against the death penalty.
Mendoza said she attended
Kazama's presentation because
of an interest that was sparked
from a criminal psychology
class she took last semester that
gave her new information and
opinions regarding the current
criminal system in America.
"I always like looking below
the surface," she said.
Mendoza said she wants the
prison system to focus more on
rehabilitation rather than harsh
punishments - especially in
terms of juveniles.
"Kids are the least likely to
have better influences and the
most likely to be able to change
in the future," she said. "Cut-

OSCR
Continued from page 1
these numbers due to the AVI.
Hulswit said she was unsure why the dis-
crepancy existed but said one factor could
be that a case of forgery is counted as three
charges when brought to OSCR - mak-
ing, possessing and using a false document
- while counted as only one charge when
reported to DPS.
The report also showed 20 violations
of illegally possessing, using, distributing,
manufacturing or selling alcohol and other
drugs. Hulswit said this statistic did not rep-
resent a significant change from previous
years but that OSCR was continuing to try
and keep these numbers down. She said part
of this effort has been through reaching out
to students for their input.
OSCR has implemented an advisory

board within the Michigan Student Assem-
bly to assist in emerging issues, outreach,
programming, training and other ways of
reaching out to the University community.
Elkin said OSCR has made significant
efforts to incorporate student input in the
projects, such as an online program that
could aid students who are struggling to
overcome habitual marijuana use. OSCR is
currently evaluating the program to see if its
implementation would be beneficial to stu-
dents.
OSCR also worked closely with MSA
earlier this year through the Code of Con-
duct Advisory Board, which met to help
suggest and discuss changes to the Code of
Conduct.
"That's really been a theme for us this year
- is to figure out how students can inform
our best practices, in terms of what will be
useful towards their education," Elkin said.

MSA
Continued from page 1
Khan also noted that during the previous
two years of the program, people have gained
a new and more comprehensive understand-
ing of Islam.
"It makes me very hopeful for the future,"
she said.
Other opportunities for participating stu-
dents are the option of fasting as a Muslim
would during the month of Ramadan or par-
ticipating in prayer with their Muslim partner
at each of the five times observant Muslims

pray each day.
A question-and-answer session will be
held tomorrow night to allow participants
to ask why people chose Islam and to
clear up any false impressions of Islam,
Tarsin said.
According to Tarsin, past programs have
included between 10 and 20 participants. This
year, those who take part in the program will
receive a tote bag filled with informational
books on Islam and a calendar with Islamic
images from around the world.
"People can take something tangible home
with them and maybe benefit from it later on,"

SYRIA
Continued from page 1
of 3.7 million. An Associated Press esti-
mate put the crowd's size at 400,000 to
500,000.
A large proportion appeared to have
come in from the heavily Shiite regions of
the eastern Bekaa Valley and the south. In
those areas, loudspeakers urged followers
to travel to Beirut for the protest.
Awarki, surrounded by dozens of fellow
schoolgirls in gray uniforms and black and
gray scarves over their heads, said "at least
three-quarters" of her school had come to
Beirut "because the sheik invited us" -
referring to Sheik Hassan Nasrallah, the
Hezbollah leader.
Nasrallah addressed the crowd from a
balcony on a building facing the square.
"I ask our partners in the country orthose
looking at us from abroad, 'Are all those
hundreds of thousands of people puppets?'
Is all this crowd agents for the Syrians and
intelligence agencies?"'he said.
Nasrallah directly addressed Israel, tell-
ing it to let go of "dreams for Lebanon."
"To this enemy we say again: There is
no place for you here and there is no life for
you among us. Death to Israel!" he said.
"Lebanon is not Ukraine," Nasrallah
said, referring to that country's "orange
revolution" last year. "If anyone thinks you
can bring down a state with a few dem-
onstrations, a few scarves, a few shouts, a
few media, he is suspect, he is wrong."
Nasrallah also warned Washington
against any military action to achieve
its goals.
"The fleets came in the past and were
defeated. They will be defeated again,"
he said to the cheers of supporters wildly
waving Lebanon's cedar-tree flag.
The weeks of anti-Syrian demonstra-
tions in Beirut followed the Feb. 14 assas-
sination of former Prime Minister Rafik
Hariri. Many Lebanese accuse Syria and
Lebanon's government of responsibility
for Hariri's death; both deny any involve-

ment. At one point in yesterday's rally, the
crowd observed a moment of silence for
Hariri.
Yesterday's rally was far larger than
the more than 70,000 anti-Syrian pro-
testers who filled the nearby Martyrs'
Square the day before. That square, just a
few blocks away, was mostly quiet during
the Hezbollah rally, and Lebanese army
armored vehicles blocked the roads lead-
ing between the squares.
At least one opposition leader said the
pro-Syrian government pressured people
to turn out and some reports said Syria
had bused in people from across the bor-
der. But on a mountain road leading to
Beirut, only one bus with a Syrian license
plate was spotted in a convoy of pro-Syr-
ian supporters heading to the capital and
Hezbollah officials denied the charges.
Dory Chamoun, an opposition leader,
dismissed Hezbollah's demonstration as
"muscle-flexing"
"Yes, we all know that Hezbollah has
the material capability to mobilize such
large numbers of people and more," he told
AP. "But the difference is that in our dem-
onstrations, people arrive voluntarily and
on foot, not in buses pushed by someone
to demonstrate against something most of
them don't even understand."
Lebanese Defense Minister Abdul-
Rahim Murad told AP that the Syrian
pullback would include the main Syrian
intelligence offices in Beirut.
The withdrawal of Syrian intelligence
- a key part of Damascus' control - is
a central demand of the United States
and Lebanese opposition. Washington
has said Syria's pullback to the border is
not enough, demanding all Syrian forces
and intelligence out by Lebanese elec-
tions in May.
Syria has had troops here since 1976,
when they were sent as peacekeep-
ers during Lebanon's 1975-90 civil
war. When the war ended, the troops
remained and Syria has dominated
Lebanon's politics since.

ting their future
unfortunate."

short is really

SACAGAWEA
Continued from page 1
Thomasma wrote the book because he said Sacagawea
is not given enough credit for her contributions to the
Lewis and Clark expedition.
"I read the two million words Lewis and Clark wrote,
and I pulled out every reference to her," he said.
Thomasma's book came out the same year
Congress was considering replacing the Susan
B. Anthony dollar with a coin bearing the like-
ness of Sacagawea. Thomasma said he was
heavily involved in lobbying for the selection of
Sacagawea for the coin.
"I sent my book to the Secretary (of the Treasury),"
he said. "This is the little girl that had five major con-
tributions (to the Lewis and Clark expedition), and we
turned on her, exploited her. I said, 'Mr. Secretary, we
need to put her on a coin.'"
Notre Dame History Prof. Thomas Slaughter, who
recently authored his own book on Sacagawea, said
she is important to study because "her perspective
was undoubtedly entirely different than anyone else
in the expedition."
the michigan daily

"She was going home. Everyone else was going
away from home. ... Her story is much different than
the story of other people in the expedition," he said.
Slaughter said one of the most important contribu-
tions Sacagawea made to the expedition was simply
her presence. "Sacagawea helped to change the mas-
culine and military image of the expedition," he said.
He added that the Native American tribes Lewis and
Clark encountered on their journey did not under-
stand why they were traveling.
"The expedition made no sense from an Indian
point of view. They weren't traders, they weren't a war
party and they didn't look like they were members of
the same tribe. The woman was even more confusing,
which was good and led a lot of Indians to treat Lewis
and Clark as if they were not a war party, which was
greatly to their advantage," Slaughter said.
Despite the "five major contributions" of Sacagawea
that Thomasma teaches, some Native Americans do
not feel she is an important figure in their history. "I
think that she's been romanticized beyond the purpose
that she actually served," said LSA sophomore Britta-
ny Marino, a member of the Native American Student
Association and the Cree tribe.

"Beyond what I learned in school, I never really
learned more about her. I've never been exposed to
any sort of honoring or education thing that's been
focused on her," she said.
Marino went on to say she believes the reason
Sacagawea is so famous is due to her interaction with
Europeans. Marino said Americans need to be taught
about Native Americans who were leaders among their
own people - without European interaction.
Slaughter agreed that Sacagawea's popularity
stems from her involvement with white Ameri-
cans. "She is now a symbol of multicultural Amer-
ica," he said. "She is part of the United States. She
is not just an Indian waiting and receiving (white
explorers). She is a part of the expedition. At a
minimum, what she does is get into the story as
(a Native American) actor rather than simply one
who is acted upon," he said.
As for Thomasma, he said he will continue to
tell the story of Sacagawea. Last year's bicen-
tennial anniversary of the expedition has given
Lewis and Clark a national spotlight, he said.
"This is the time of high interest, I have to (teach
this) now," he added.

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