100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 07, 2005 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2005-03-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

M=PACT
",-Continued from page 1A
:the survival of M-PACT will be created
through a massive fundraising effort,
Coleman said.
The new program will also be help-
ful to students no longer receiving a
Pell Grant under a new federal for-
mula determining eligibility. Under
the new formula, the Bush administra-
tion will cut grants to students who no
longer qualify for them because their
family income has increased. The
-money saved from this process will
go toward making the grants given to
more needy students larger and possi-
bly increasing the number of students
receiving grants
The new formula will affect Univer-
sity students because 1,677 out of the
3,335 undergraduates who receive the
grant will lose about $400, the Detroit
-Free Press reported, while 300 Univer-
PIRGM
Continued from page 1A
As part of its drive to protect ten-
ant rights, Student PIRGIM would
distribute a two-part scientific sur-
vey to students about their expe-
riences renting or leasing in Ann
Arbor. The first part would ask
about students' experiences and the
second would gauge their literacy on
subjects, such as whether it is legal
for a landlord to charge a cleaning
fee. Student PIRGIM would then use
that information to set up a hotline
in the fall.
Another possible campaign
involves working with Granholm on
Michigan's high mercury levels in
water. The mercury renders the water
unsafe because of possible birth
DONATION
Continued from page 1A
will attract and the more money you will
attract."
The Detroit-based Carls Foundation
made the donation as part of its con-
tinuing pledge to promote children's
welfare. Industrialist William Carls
and his wife Marie created the founda-

NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 7, 2005 - 7A

sity students will no longer qualify for
the grants.
Engineering sophomore Conor
Burns said the new grant program
would be extremely beneficial to
him. Burns said he will be losing
grant money due to the recent cuts
made to the Pell Grant program.
"Basically, I'm receiving about
$10,000 a year in loans and I'm
$15,000 in debt, so having more
grant options would be great," Burns
said. "I don't want to be shackled
with more debt than I can possibly
pay off in the 10 years after I gradu-
ate. The less I have to pay back, the
better."
Although M-PACT aims to help
those whose families fall into the
lowest income bracket and who
already qualify for the highest Pell
Grant of a little more than $4,000,
Coleman expressed hope that the pro-
gram would benefit those whose fami-

lies fall into a higher income bracket
- $50,000 to $70,000 per year - but
still have trouble paying for college.
Andrea Craig, a counselor at Detroit
City High School said she was excited
to hear that M-PACT may help families
who do not fall into the lowest income
bracket.
"Working families who are not mak-
ing an extremely high amount of money,
but just meeting their needs don't get the
Pell Grant money, you have to be con-
sidered destitute in order to qualify,"
Craig said. "It would be wonderful for
a good student coming from an average
income family to qualify for this new
grant program."
Eligibility for M-PACT grants will
be determined by the level of family
contribution and other factors used to
distribute financial aid packages. Two-
thirds of University students currently
receive need-based financial aid in the
form of grants, loans or scholarships.

defects, Fox said.
"Over two years, we could help
reduce the mercury levels by 90 per-
cent," Fox said. "The Bush administra-
tion's plan would only do that much in
10 years."
PIRGIM had a student chapter at the
University in the 1970s and 1980s. At
that time, it was instrumental in plac-
ing blue-light emergency phones on
campus and requiring gas stations to
post prices, Hwang said.
"When we were a chapter, we could
do a lot more," she added.
According to Hwang, the regents
eliminated the chapter's funding in the
1980s because it feared the group had
too much influence.
Students For PIRGIM has been
meeting with MSA members since
the beginning of the school year in an

attempt to clear the path to funding.
Fox estimates the group collaborated
with two-thirds of the assembly's lead-
ers, but Wells-Reid did not notify it of
the injunction until less than a week
before the scheduled vote.
"He's been looking at the tax issue
for a while, and it wasn't until Fri-
day that he decided it was important
enough for the case," said second-year
Law School student Cliff Davidson,
Wells-Reid's legal counsel.
Students For PIRGIM has asked
Wells-Reid to drop the case because
the group believes it has addressed all
of his concerns, Fox said.
"If we lose the trial, then we will
continue to work as we've been func-
tioning," Hwang said. "(MSA's fund-
ing) is pretty critical to what we want
to accomplish."

tion that promotes children's welfare.
"Having lost their only child in
infancy, William and Marie Carls
experienced personally the need for
advanced and readily available pedi-
atric medical care and made it a prin-
cipled mission of the foundation they
established," said Elizabeth Stieg,
executive director of The Carls Foun-
dation in a press release. "The Trust-

ees of The Carls Foundation felt that
the Mott Children's Hospital plans
for a new facility are clearly needed
and help fulfill that mission."
The Carls Foundation has given
Motts donations before that have
helped fund research of jaw-related
birth defects and establish a new
diagnostic and treatment program
for children at risk for hearing loss.

IRAN
Continued from page 1A
toppled the Shah and brought the late
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to power.
"If the Shah is in Iran, you would
give him nuclear technology, but if
Imam (Khomeini) is in Iran, you can't
do that ... the history of nuclear energy
in Iran is a lesson in contradictions in
Western policy towards Iran," he said.
But Rafsanjani said Iran has been
very transparent since 2002 when
aspects of its nuclear activities were
revealed and that it has cooperated

with the International Atomic Energy
Agency, the U.N. nuclear watchdog, to
dispel suspicions that it was seeking
nuclear weapons.
He said Iran would never agree to a
permanent halt on enriching uranium,.
a technology he says Tehran is entitled
to under the Nuclear Nonproliferation
Treaty.
Iran suspended its uranium enrich-
ment activities last year to create confi-
dence and avoid U.N. Security Council
sanctions. But Tehran says maintaining
the voluntary freeze depends on prog-
ress in ongoing talks with Britain, Ger-

many and France, who are negotiating
on behalf of the European Union.
"Definitely we can't stop our nuclear
program and won't stop it. You can't
take technology away from a country
already possessing it," Rafsanjani said.
Alaeddin Boroujerdi, head of the
National Security and Foreign Policy
committee of the Iranian parliament,
told the conference that Parliament
would not approve additional proto-
col to the NPT if the Europeans insist
Iran turn its temporary suspension of
uranium enrichment-related activi-
ties into a permanent freeze.

MSA
Continued from page 1A
One source of competitors is Maize Rage,
which draws all its candidates from the orga-
nization of athletic supporters that bears the
same name. But the party is not focused on
University athletics. Rather, it is mounting
a campaign of change. Chrzanowski said he
aims to change the emphasis of MSA.
"Their attention is on a lot of issues that
aon't necessarily impact students directly,"
Chrzanowski said. "We'd like to see a lot
that attention turned to how they can help the
students on campus." He pointed in particu-
lar to what he called MSA's focus on inter-
ational events.
Stenvig took issue with Chrzanowski's

characterization of the student assembly.
"I would say the opposite," she said. "We
don't live in a bubble. These issues directly
affect students on campus in a broad and
sweeping way." She added that MSA does
not ignore strictly campus concerns, attrib-
uting Chrzanowski's opinion to critics of the
predominately liberal agenda of MSA.
Still, Chrzanowski predicted his party
will fare well with students who are disen-
chanted with MSA and feel it does not rep-
resent them.
The LSA sophomore was also critical of
the way other MSA parties have conducted
their campaigns.
"One of the things we definitely do not
want to do is the dorm invasion tactic. That
is one thing we will not do," he said. Instead,

Chrzanowski said, "Our primary goal is
going to be encouraging people to actually
vote." He vowed to mount a positive cam-
paign, saying "We're not looking for a blood-
bath here."
As in last November's elections, DAAP
will again focus on increasing minority
enrollment. Black enrollment 'declined 15
percent in the current academic year, the
first since the new application was created.
"To have black enrollment drop 15 percent,
this fight is just beginning," Stenvig said.
The central goal of Stenvig's party remains
the defense of the University's race-con-
scious admissions policies.
But in a possible move to attract traditional
DAAP supporters, Levine said, "The leader-
ship of Students 4 Michigan is committed to

standing behind U-M's admissions policies.
In that respect, we do not differ much from
DAA P."
Stenvig said Levine's position does not
erase the need for her party.
"I'm glad that they're taking that posi-
tion," she said, adding that her party has
taken leadership on the issue.
Levine said his party has broad appeal.
"As a party, we aim to be representative of
campus," he said. "We're running people with
a variety of political viewpoints." These can-
didates include College Republicans Chair
Allison Jacobs, Saamir Rahman, member of
Students Organizing for Labor and Econom-
ic Equality and Bart Kumor, who serves on
MSA's Peace and Justice Commission.
Stenvig criticized Students 4 Michigan's

selection of candidates as electioneering.
"We don't want to compromise our posi-
tion just to win a few votes," she said. "That's
ridiculous." She also denied that DAAP is a
one-issue party.
"Even if they aren't particularly focused
on Ann Arbor, we are the people who will
defend students' rights on campus," she
said.
MSA campaigns begin on Wednesday,
when Students 4 Michigan will have final-
ized its party platform.

4

the michigan daily

STUDIO,1 & 2
E BEDROOM
UNITS.
Furnished & Unfurnished.
One block from UM Campus
Tower Plaza. 663-1530.

NOW SHOWING

GET PAID FOR YOUR OPINIONS!
Earn $15-$125 and more per survey!
www.moneyforsurveys.com

S

2 Bedroom apartments and efficiencies
**FREE INTERNET, Newly REMODELED
** GREAT rate & LOCATIONS
**Fully Furnished
Prime
610 Church Street
761-8000
www.primesh.com

£
"
,
;

GREAT HOUSES, GREAT APART
MENS!
!!12005 Lease!!!
ALL HOUSES. HAVE 6 LG. BEDROOMS!
Plus many have studies as shown below!!!!
LOCATION STDY. BATH. PRKG. TERM
927 S. State 0 2J 4 M or S
418 E. Kingsley 0 2 4 M or S
926 Sylvan 1 3 J 6 Sept.
909 Sylvan 2 3 J 7 Sept.
1012 Michigan 0 3 6 Sept
M=May S=Sept. J=Jacuzzi Stdy.=Study
All have been completely remodeled.
Oak floors, new carpet & fum., 2 new side
by side fridges, trash compactor, dwshr
I have central A/C, the rest have room A/C.

PETS WELCOME: CONTEMPORARY 1 &
2 bdrm. apt. Great campus locations. Call for
details 741-9657.
RIVER'S EDGE APARTMENTS! 1 mo.
free! Why pay the high A2 prices? Ypsilanti
is only 15 min. drive to campus. Leasing
now! 1, 2, & 3 bdrms. From $595. Free
Heat & Water. 487-5750. Virtual tours and
apply online at www.riversedge.org

$600 GROUP FUNDRAISER
Scheduling Bonus
4 hrs. of your group's time PLUS our free
(yes, free) fundraising solutions EQUALS
$1,000-$2,000 in earnings for your group.
Call TODAY for a $600 bonus when you
schedule your non-sales fundraiser with Cam-
pusFundraiser. Contact CampusFundraiser,
(888)923-3238, or visit
www.campusfundraiser.com
COLLEGE CLEANERS: PROF. Dry Clean-
ing & Ldry. Free summer storage. 715 N.
University next to Hill Auditorium. 662-1906.
EDITING. LANGUAGE, ORGANIZA-
tion, format. All disciplines. 25 yrs. exp.
996-0566 or writeon@htdconnect.com
MEDIA POWER MICHIGAN'S only autho-
rized Avid & Apple training center. Contact
us @ 248-351-0101 or visit media-power.com
MOST IMPORTANT SKILL for law school
success? Check out lawschoolprepcourse.com

LEARN TO EARN $5K to $10K wk. PfT,
No selling, telling, or explaining. Proven sys-
tem. Trained by millionaires. 888-687-2564.
PAID EXPERIMENTS
Go to www.michiganpaidexperiments.org to
be notified about paid experiment opportuni-
ties! Multi-player games, marketing surveys,
etc. Pay $10-$50. New experiments posted
weekly on site, and sent out as email an-
nouncements to registered users. Non-stu-
dents welcome.
PHARMACOGENETICS AND EYE
Pressure Control
The U-M Kellogg Eye Center is currently
conducting research to understand how eye
pressure is controlled by specific genes. You
can participate if you: are between 18 and 50
years of age; are not pregnant; have no his-
tory of severe asthma, eye surgery or eye
trauma. Upon completion of the study, partic-
ipants will be compensated. This study in-
volves minimally invasive procedures. For
more information, please contact the U-M
Kellogg Eye Center at 888-393-4677(EYE-
IOPS). irbmed number 2002-0580.

PREMIERE CO-ED CAMP on mountain
lake setting hiring instructors & supervisors
for Waterski, Watersports, Tennis, Outdoor
Adventure, Ropes, Land Sports, Gymnastics,
Creative & Performing Arts, Incl. Guitar.
Dates: 6/16-8/21. Have a summer of a life-
time in beautiful Maine! Contact
1.888.993.5335, CampWekeela@aol.com
Apply at www.campwekeela.com
TOP BOYS SPORTS CAMP IN MAINE!
Play & Coach Sports * Have Fun * Make $$$
Camp counselors positions available
Summer 2005.
Apply online www.campcobbossee.com
Or call 1-800473-6104.

SUMMER CAMP POSITIONS: Make a dif-
ference in the life of a child! Summer ther-
apy camp for children with physical disabili-
ties. Located on shore of Lake Superior in
Big Bay, MI. Positions available for Coun-
selors, Waterfront, Instructors for Nature/
Arts & Crafts/Recreation/Canoeing, Nurses,
Therapists, Food Service, and Auxiliary.
Must be enthusiastic, responsible, and love
children. June 12 through August 7. Salary,
room & board, and experience of lifetime
provided. Call or write for application and
information. Bay Cliff Health Camp, PO.
Box 310, Big Bay, MI 49808,906-345-9314,
e-mail BayCliffHC@aol.com
Visit us at www.baycliff.org
SWIMMING POOL SERVICE and
construction. Fast paced outdoor work,
weekends off. Top pay for hard working, self-
motivated people to work inthe NW
DETROIT SUBURBS. 248-477-7727.
WANT TO LIVE in a GREAT apartment
AND earn some CASH?
Varsity Management has an opening for
Resident Managers at 848 Tappan (Park Ter-
race) apartments and other locations.
Call us at 734.668.1100 for details.

APARTMENTS IN 2 LOCATIONS!!!
'3 Min. Walk to Frieze Bldg.,
'(B. Kingsley/ Division)
.2 Historic bldgs. completely remodeled.
-2 bdrm. penthouse, see all of A2, Avail. Fall.
-31g. bdrms. w/ free vanity. Avail. Now, Fall
-6 bdrm., complete remodel in process, Fall.
Modern Apartment Building: Remodeled
- 2 bdrm. culinary delight, trash compacter.
19 ft of counter space, dwshr., etc.
Avail. Now and Fall
3 Min. walk to South Quad
1 & 2 bdrm. 100% remodeled apts. with new
'fum., oak firs., new carpet, prkg., A/C, dw-
shr., & cable. Avail. Now, Spring & Fall.
Both apt. locations include: Idry., great prkg.,
and heat/water
Please Call: 973-7368.

BABYSIT'ER NEEDED FOR wk.day after-
noons & Fri. or Sat. night. Flex. sched. Con-
tact 734-662-8990 or Mcfinton@umich.edu
BABYSITTER NEEDED IN AA area, start-
ing now. Part time, flex. hrs. must love kids.
ref. req. Call 734-769-7786.
EARLY CHILDHOOD SUBSTITUTES
needed. Fun job working w/ young children.
$8/hr. Work according to your schedule.
Call the director at 734-668-0887.

$440-1 BDRMJBATH. APT. unfurn., $480
fum. Tappan/Hill. Free prkg. Ldry. in Bldg.
Avail. May 20th, Call Davia: 734-929-0765.

!!!BARTENDER TRAINEES $300!!! a day
potential, Age 18+ ok. No experience neces-
sary, training provided. 800-965-6520 x 125.
$9.50/HR. MICHIGAN TELEFUND is now
hiring students for flex. night and weekend
schedules. Awesome Resume Builder! Work
Study / Non-Work Study. Apply online:
www.telefund.umich.edu or 998-7420.

!!FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED!
$450/mo. 4 bdrm. Condo., 1 bdrm. left. Utils.
incl., A/C.,' Idry., & free prkg. Cable TV,
DSL. Call 313-838-2629.
FEMALE RMMTE. NEEDED - Grad. stud.
for rm. in townhse. Fum., wshr./dryer, prkg.

The Michigan Daily is now hiring
Advertising Account Executives for the
Spring, Summer, and Fall terms.

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan