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February 08, 2005 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2005-02-08

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, February 8, 2005 - 3

0 N CAMPUS
Benefit party aims
to raise aid for
tsunami survivors
A benefit party to raise aid for tsuna-
mi survivors will be held tonight from 9
p.m. to 2 a.m. at Rick's American Cafe
in Ann Arbor. The event, sponsored
by the School of Social Work Student
Union, will include a live D.J. and door
prizes donated by local businesses such
as STA Travel and Footprints. Tickets
are $6 at the door and 80 percent of the
proceeds will go to the United Nations
World Food Program.
Social activist
* speaks on the role
of philanthropists
Emmett Carson, social activist and
CEO of the Minneapolis Foundation,
will speak today at 5 p.m. in room D1273
in Davidson Hall of the Stephen M. Ross
School of Business. Carson has earned
recognition by the Nonprofit Times as
being one of the United States' 50 most
influential nonprofit leaders.
Grassroots activist
to lecture at 'U,
The Institute for Research on Women
and Gender presents activist and writer
Minnie Bruce Pratt today from 4p.m. to
6 p.m. in room 2239 of Lane Hall. Pratt,
winner of the American Library Associa-
tion Gay and Lesbian Book Award and
other literary fellowships, has been active
S in the struggle for liberation through the
organization of grass-roots movements.
CRIME
Subjects found
stealing benches
The Department of Public Safety
caught subjects attempting to steal bench-
es from Michigan Stadium on Sunday.
The subjects were detained, but they have
been released pending charges.
Figurines stolen
from Markley
A subject reported to DPS that three
figurines were stolen from a dorm room in
Little House in Mary Markley Residence
Hall. There are currently no suspects.
People escorted
away for arguing
Subjects were found arguing at the
Ronald McDonald House on Sunday
morning. DPS escorted them off the
property at the staff's request.
THIS DAY
S In Daily History

'Traying' declines
due to lack of
snowr
Feb. 8, 1980 - With the decline in
snow, students have said the is a notice-
ble lack of "traying" on campus.
"Traying" is the recreation of
sledding down the snow on a cafete-
ria lunch tray.
"I've only gone once this year," com-
plained LSA sophomore Jeff Ivay.
As a result, cafeterias across campus
have seen a decrease in the number of
lunch trays stolen.
CORRECTIONS
An article on page 3A of yesterday's
edition of the Daily should have said Pi
Kappa Alpha is participating in the jour-
ney of hope.
An article on page lA of yesterday's
edition of the Daily should not have said
the Greek Activities Review Board is con-
sidering expelling SAE. The board makes
recommendations to IFC about expulsions,
and the issue is then voted on by the IFC
pesidents. The article should not have said
U that SAE is on social probation for the DKE

University appoints new director of ISR

By Karl Stampfl
Daily Staff Reporter

When distinguished researcher James Jack-
son takes over as director of what is often
called the best social research institute in the
world, he will face the
task of maintaining its
considerable reputation.
"This is one of those;
cases that we often have
at Michigan when we have
the best program in the:
world - the first course of
business is always keeping
it the best," Provost Paul
Courant said.
Courant announced last
week that distinguished Jackson
researcher James Jackson
will take over as director of the University's Insti-
tute for Social Research, effective July 1.
Jackson currently directs the ISR's Research

Center for Group Dynamics, the Program for
Research on Black Americans and the Center for
Afroamerican and African Studies. He is also a
social psychologist and the Daniel Katz Distin-
guished Professor of Psychology.
"He's been at the University for over 30 years
and has an international reputation as one of the
leading social researchers of our time," Courant
said. "It's a long list of accomplishments. He's a
very, very able man."
In 1980, Jackson directed the first-ever survey
with a nationally representative sample of black
Americans. Finding blacks to survey in the rural
South and urban areas was easy, but surveyors
wanted a truly nationally representative sample,
including blacks in mainly white, sparsely popu-
lated areas such as Montana and Wyoming.
Going door-to-door would have been too expen-
sive and taken too long. Jackson's idea to ask whites
in the area, who knew exactly where all the black
families lived, solved the problem. He dubbed the
procedure the Wide Area Sampling Procedure
- WASP.

"He will be a strong advocate for the importance
of social science in national conversations about
important policies like Social Security and Medicare.'
- David Featherman
Outgoing director of ISR

He has published many books and articles, most
notably on race relations, aging, health, immigra-
tion and African-American politics.
As the head of ISR, Jackson will lead over 600
regular staff members and more than 1,000 tem-
porary employees involved in fielding surveys all
over the country. He will also be in charge of a
budget of about $75 million a year.
Jackson will replace current ISR Director David
Featherman, who is stepping down after his second
five-year term as director. He will remain in ISR,
becoming the director of its Center for Advancing

ISRAEL
Continued from page:
programs right now, tl
certainly ways in which
who want to study in Isr
Dickerman said. "It's no
sible for students to go."
Gonik said instead of
for Israel to be remove
the list, the University
establish a program but
students to sign a waiver
ing the University of any1
AMI is currently worki
lawyers to develop such a
Programs like this ha
very successful at the
sity of Arizona, the Univ
Pennsylvania and all of t
University of New York
Gonik said.
"We don't want to put
dents in harm, but we

Research and Solutions for Society.
"I am very pleased that James will guide the
institute through what could be a challenging
period for the institute's scientific leadership
because of tighter federal funding," Featherman
said in a written statement. "He will be a strong
advocate for the importance of social science in
national conversations about important policies
like Social Security and Medicare."
Jackson will also aim to increase collaboration
among the different centers under the umbrella
of ISR.
"For me, the
1
here are benefits clearly
studentsth
ael can," outweigh the
.t impos- risks. Life is full of
waiting uncertainties, but
ed from
should to finally be active
require
absolv- about beliefs I've
liability.
ng with had my whole
waiver. lifeincredible ,"
ve been e Sd
Univer-
'ersity of
he State . Jennifer Rosen
schools,
LSA junior
any stu-
feel that

studying abroad in Israel is such a valuable and important experience, and
many students are very interested and shouldn't have to deal with the barriers
that the University of Michigan is imposing," Gonik said.
Adelsky said the value of studying abroad in Israel outweighs any risks
involved in traveling there and that many people have misconceptions of Israel
as a heated war zone.
"That risk is largely exaggerated by the media. The situation here is quite
calm, and I feel extremely safe," Adelsky said.
Rosen agreed, saying she believes people are mistaken in their fear of trav-
eling to Israel, when in reality, the experience has been invaluable.
"For me, the benefits clearly outweigh the risks. Life is full of uncertain-
ties, but to finally be active about beliefs I've had my whole life is incredible,"
Rosen said.
"The pride I feel for being here, in Israel, is inexplicable."
When a series of terrorist train bombings rattled Spain last March, the OIP
did not cancel any study abroad programs to Spain.
There was no travel warning in effect, but the U.S. Department of State did
release a public announcement directing U.S. citizens in Spain to "remain alert
and avoid large crowds when possible."

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