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NEWS

The Michigan

Daily -Friday, February 4, 2005 - 7

The.. Michigan J .Daily - ...F.i.a..Jar . 20

* PRESERVES
Continued from page 1
tal conservation." Continental-scale
conservation involves the linking of
environmental preserves to form a
series of broader networks that will
enable the highest degree of wildlife
sustainability.
"Single, large protected areas are bet-
ter than several small, isolated protected
areas. In North America we don't have
these kinds of places," he said.
Foreman said such preserves will reg-
ulate local ecological systems by giving
carnivores at the top of the food chain
a chance to roam uninhibited in their
natural environment. These animals,
in turn, provide protection for smaller,
native species.
Such steps are necessary as a result of
current human interaction with environ-
mental systems, Foreman said.
"Right now, today, we are in a
mass extinction event. It is caused
by one species: us. We human beings
have become a geological force in

this mass extinction," he said. "We
are now exploiting every square inch
of the earth."
Constructing the massive preserves
required for such a project would almost
certainly be met with resistance given
the realities of urban sprawl and gov-
ernment policy. But Foreman said he
does not believe these problems should
discourage the enactment of his vision.
"I'm not talking about doing the impos-
sible. ... We do it one piece at a time."
Recently, Foreman has been
encouraged by the pieces he sees as
falling into place around the country.
He cited the release of wolves back
into Yellowstone National Park and
the policies of local governments in
California as major victories for the
conservationist movement.
"We need to have a hopeful vision for
the future, and that is what continental-
scale conservation is all about," he said.
"Remarkable things can happen when
you have a bold, hopeful vision."
Still, Foreman said he believes much
work must be done and pleaded with

audience members for further action.
Listeners in the auditorium were
receptive to the call following the
speech. Engineering sophomore
Doug Fynan was drawn to the event
as an individual who had "always
been involved in environmental orga-
nizations." He left feeling as though
Foreman presented "down-to-earth
solutions an average American can
see as logical."
Jen Kullgren, an LSA sophomore,
shared similar thoughts. "He did a
real good job of giving us a more prac-
tical side" to environmental policy,
Kullgren said, adding that his ideas
seemed feasible.
Foreman's credentials as an author
and advocate drew a crowd that nearly
filled the auditorium for the 45-minute
talk, which was followed by a question-
and-answer session.
Foreman summarized the proceed-
ings simply. "The most important thing
is how we apply science to on-the-
ground conservation. We can do better,
but it is up to us to do better."

DIVESTM ENT
Continued from page 1
abstention. Evenson plans to send a let-
ter to the Wisconsin Board of Regents
suggesting it consider divestment soon.
"We're a relatively small campus, but
in some ways this hasn't happened on a
big campus anywhere in the country,"
Evenson said.
At the University of Michigan, the
pro-Palestinian campus group Stu-
dents Allied for Freedom and Equal-
ity leads a campaign to divest from
Israel. SAFE is planning to make
some kind of formal recommenda-
tion to the University that it divest
from Israel, said fifth-year LSA
student and SAFE vice-chair Salah
Husseini.
Husseini said he would not go into
details as to what channels SAFE
plans to use because it does not want to
reveal its strategy to opposing groups,
but he reiterated why SAFE supports
divestment.
"We should have a moral basis for
our investments," Husseini said. "We
shouldn't invest in things that result in
the killing of people."
SAFE has had several speakers on
the subject of divestment this semester,
Husseini said.
"It's not a political issue for us," he
said. "It's really an issue of human

rights. It shouldn't matter what side of
the Israeli-Palestinian conflict you're
on. There are millions of Palestinians
whose rights are being violated and our
money is helping to do that."
But only on rare occasions does the
University let politics determine its
investment options, University spokes-
woman Julie Peterson said, citing the
University's 1978 divestment from
South Africa because of apartheid and
the 2000 divestment from tobacco com-
panies. On both of those occasions,
holding those investments threatened
the University's values and mission,
Peterson said.
"There is not enough evidence that that
is happening in Israel to divest," she said.
The issue has come up before at
the University, most notably in Fall
2002, when students from more than
70 universities drew national atten-
tion by gathering on the Diag to pro-
test universities investing in Israel.
The rally prompted University Pres-
ident Mary Sue Coleman to release a
statement saying the University had
no plans to divest. At the time, of the
University's $3.4 billion investment
portfolio, it had stock in two compa-
nies directly located in Israel with a
total value of about $500,000.
In 2003, the issue came up again
before the Michigan Student Assem-
bly. Two students sponsored a reso-

lution to suggest to the University
Board of Regents that the University
divest from Israel. MSA voted the
resolution down by a near two-thirds
majority.
"The vote was overwhelming-
ly against," MSA President Jason
Mironov said. "Since then there's
been some discussion, but no votes
to pass resolutions have occurred."
Divestment has not come up much
on campus since then, said Rabbi
Jason Miller, assistant director of
the University of Michigan Hillel
chapter.
"This is old news," he said. "No
universities will actually divest from
Israel, which is a good thing because
there's a lot to gain from business
partnerships with Israel."
Jessica Reisch, co-chair of the
American Movement for Israel, said
divesting from Israel would hinder
the peace process.
"It counteracts any steps toward a last-
ing and viable peace," she said. "It will
hurt not only the Israeli's economy but
the Palestinian's economy because it's
dependent on the Israelis."
Reisch also said that divesting
from Israel is a form of prejudice
against Jews.
"I personally think that divesting
from Israel is anti-Israeli and that
it's also anti-Semitic," Reisch said.

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GROUPS
Continued from page 1
revolves around an issue relevant to
University student organizations,
such as risk management, finances,
scheduling and space allocation.
"I think that the point of the sev-
eral subcommittees is just that there
is so much work and the requirement
of distinct areas of expertise such as
financial management, risk manage-
ment, legal requirements, etc. We
wanted the risk, legal and economic
issues divided up a certain way for
discussion purposes. No doubt the
early recommendations of certain
subcommittees might be in conflict
with others; yet, part of the process
is to figure out how we can all work
together to create a good whole."
Eklund said.
Students play an important role
in subcommittees. MSA Vice Presi-
dent Anita Leung participates in the
financial committee, where she dis-
cusses issues such as the role of non-
profit organizations, filing for taxes
and how to follow IRS regulations.
"Nothing like this has been done
before. It has never been formalized how
student groups have been organized. I
know people are worried that student
voices are not being heard. They defi-
nitely are through SOAR," she said.
Harper agreed on the importance
of student involvement on campus.
"Student organizations provide such
a service to the community, and it
is a very valuable part of the insti-
tution. We want to make sure that
they're well served. And that is what
(SOAR) is all about - how we pro-
vide additional support so that we
can strengthen student organiza-
tions," she said.
Varner said student groups might
not understand that even though the
University is self-insured, it only
covers specific items under specific
terms, she said. Part of the mis-
sion of SOAR would be to eventu-
ally implement guidelines so student
organizations can understand if they
are breaching the contract, she said.
Eklund said an example of a
potential problem would be whether
the University's insurance covers an
accident when a student organiza-
tion borrows a vehicle through the

University. The risk management
committees of SOAR would work
on potential guidelines to this inci-
dent by asking questions such as
how many students were in the car
and whether they were following the
speed limit, she said.
SOAR also seeks to create guide-
lines for student organizations that
reflect the core values of the Univer-
sity, such as diversity and equality,
Wilson said.
If SOAR's recommendations are
put into action, all student organi-
zations will be eligible for advice,
said Wilson. Even though the Greek
system has the Office of Greek Life,
various subcommittees have con-
templated methods to deal with their
specific problems, such as liability
issues with hazing.
But Varner said the Greek system
will not receive special treatment.
"We will treat the Greek system
like we treat any other student orga-
nization. We will work some of their
specific problems into our ideas for
implementation. They will also be
treated with the same expectations,"
Varner said.
SOAR is seeking more students to
provide feedback and ideas of how
to improve relations between student
organizations and the University.
Even though nothing has been
implemented yet, Wilson said that the
subcommittee meetings have already
succeeded in widening the commu-
nication gap. "If I learned anything
at Michigan it's that people do not
talk (between colleges and student
organizations.) It will be interesting
to see what other problems this will
solve," Wilson said.
Some student leaders have
expressed worry about the potential
implications of SOAR's proposals.
MSA Student General Counsel Jesse
Levine said he is concerned about
the possibility that SOAR could
change the jurisdiction of student
group oversight, potentially cutting
MSA's Central Student Judiciary out
of the process.
"The jurisdiction is not clear yet
for any student group for the future,
and that's why I'm concerned,"
Levine said. "I think students need
to be involved in the judicial pro-
cess."

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