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January 27, 2005 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 2005-01-27

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2B - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, January 27, 2005

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v

The Michigan Daily -

Random won't buy lotion for guys

taleof I contents

Now To***

purchase the perfec

By Evan McGarvey
Daily Arts Writer
R: Hello?
TMD: Hi, I'm from The Michigan
Daily and you've been selected to take the
Random Student Interview.
R: Haha, really?
TMD: Yeah, I'm dead serious. Are you
psyched?
R: Yeah, that's cool.
TMD: All right, let's go. So who's your
favorite X-Man?
R: Wolverine.
TMD: Wolverine? Whoa, girl after my
own heart. Good choice, well done. So
whose boobs are you more likely to see
at the Super Bowl: Janet Jackson or Tony
Siragusa?
R: Well, we already saw Janet Jackson
,and I don't know who Tony Siragusa is.
TMD: He's this really overweight guy
who does commentary for Fox Sports,
and sometimes he runs from sideline to
sideline, and we get a little man-boob jig-
gle. I wasn't sure if we might see his. I'm
kind of gunning for it. So what was your
New Year's resolution?
R: I didn't have one.
TMD: Why not?
R: I think it's stupid.
TMD: You're not the first person to say
that tonight. Have you ever tried to make
one?
R: Not that I can recall.
TMD: Talk about your New Year's.
What did you do?
R: What did I do? I went to dinner, and
then I saw "Ocean's Twelve."
TMD: That's like the most boring New
Year's I've ever heard of in my life.
R: Yeah, I'm from a small town.

TMD: What's the small town like?
R: A general store, a gas station and a
post office. That's about it.
TMD: Are there like drunken old
farmers sitting outside the general store
murmuring about the crops and general
weather activities?
R: Not at this point.
TMD: All right. So what's the bet-
ter CCR song: "Fortunate Son" or "Bad
Moon Rising?"
R: CCR?
TMD: Credence Clearwater Revival.
R: Oh, "Bad Moon Rising."
TMD: You are two for two young lady.
You are just winning this interviewer's
heart. Speaking of which, Valentine's Day
is coming up. Tell me about the last awk-
ward first date you went on. Set the scene
for us.
R: Well, we were in a park, and we
were walking, and we sat out on a blanket,
and we started to kiss, and this dog came
up and started licking us.
TMD: Really?
R: Yeah, it was pretty gross.
TMD: Now was the dog a better kisser
than the boy?
R: Haha, I don't know. His tongue
missed my mouth so I couldn't really say.
TMD: Whoa! This is G-rated, kid.
What are you doing?
R: The dog, I was talking about.
TMD: I don't even want to get into
that. Lies! Do you expect Valentine's Day
gifts from every guy you know or just if
you're dating somebody?
R: Just dating.
TMD: Now what would you give a boy
for Valentine's Day?
R: Oh god, I don't know. It's too hard-to
shop for boys.

TMD: Why?
R: I don't know. If you're shopping for
a girl you can just get them hand lotion or
something.
TMD: You can't give a guy hand
lotion? Why not?
R: They don't use it.
TMD: The guys I know use it.
R: Oh, god. I don't want them using it
for that.
TMD: You're just too pure of heart to
give a gift like that. What would you do
if someone gave you a book filled with
sex tips. Urban Outfitters, in a move to be
trendy, has a lot of sex books.
R: I would use it.
TMD: You would use the sex tips? But
wouldn't you be offended that someone
would think you would need them?
R: No.
TMD: Wouldn't that be like giving
Michael Jordan a book on how to play
basketball.
R: Yeah, but I'm not the Michael Jor-
dan of sex.
TMD: Well, you liked Wolverine, so
you had me fooled. So tell me about your
hall: What's it like?
R: I live in Martha Cook, so it's pretty
quiet.
TMD: Are you the hellraiser?
R: Not really.
TMD: Describe the personalities.
Who's the crazy foreigner ... is the RA
drunk and high all the time?
R: No, she's not. She's really nice.
TMD: Oh, that's wonderful. Well, I
just talked to her and she said she doesn't
really like you that much. Bummer.
What's the capital of Sweden?
R: Stockholm.
TMD: Holy shenanigans. We have
called multiple people and you're the first
person to get that right. Secretary General
of the United Nations?
R: Kofi Annan.
TMD: What are you doing on Satur-
day?
R: Haha.
TMD: There are guys, really nerdy
geography majors, with their hearts palpi-
tating in the room right now. Name three
countries that were created after the fall of
the U.S.S.R.
R: Let's see. Um ... Kazakhstan,

Ukraine and Estonia.
TMD: I think we just found the girl
who got 1600 on her SATs.
R: I didn't.
TMD: You didn't? Well, you could
have fooled me. Spring break sex: What
happens in Cabo stays in Cabo or what
happens in Cabo becomes a burning dis-
charge two weeks later?
R: Hmmm ... it depends on who you
sleep with.
TMD: So what you're saying is that
beggars can't be choosers in Cabo?
R: Sure.
TMD: What are your plans for Spring
Break? What about Kazakhstan?
R: Haha, I don't think so.
TMD: Why not?
R: I don't speak the language, and it's
cold.
TMD: Excellent point after excellent
point. What's more depressing: the emo
kids with really long bangs who keep
bitching about their ex-girlfriends or the
bag ladies who ask you for your trash.
R: Bag ladies.
TMD: Why?
R: It's just sad. They can't help it. With
the emo kids, it's a choice.
TMD: So you think the emo kids
choose to be really sucky and lame.
R: Well no, but ... I guess they do,
don't they?
TMD: Yep, we're on the same wave-
length here. Just can't seem to get over that
one person. It's like my ex-girlfriend who
won't stop calling me.
R: That's sad.
TMD: Women be crazy. Except you.
You knew where Kazakhstan was, and
that was very impressive. One last ques-
tion, and this is for $100 million, and if
you get this right, I think you'll be the
smartest person I think we've ever inter-
viewed in the history of the Michigan
Random Daily ... Interview ... history ...
Daily. Can you tell me the newest coun-
try in Southeast Asia? What country was
founded in our lifetime?
R: Um, East Timor?
TMD: Holy crap, that's the cor-
rect answer. I honestly thought that you
wouldn't get that. Well, I am impressed,
and I'm sure everyone else will think that
when they read this on Thursday.

3B
4B
5B
6B

Bob Hunt: I don't
want my MTV
The Weekend List
Students cash
in with small
businesses
Make the most of
your living area
Card Sharks:

By Dan Marchese
For the Daily

7 - Learn how to
play poker

8B

Adam Burns:
Let me ride

Two obstacles stand in the way of
any aspiring musician: selecting the
right instrument and having the pas-
sion to start playing and stick with
it. For someone playing guitar, for
example, picking out the right axe
and having the perseverance to keep
plucking away at the strings to learn
his or her favorite song are vital.
Fortunately, there is help available.
Herb David, owner and founder of
the 43-year-old Herb David Guitar
Studio on 302 E. Liberty St., said
there are a lot of reasons someone
might want to play music.
"All you need to do is play. Music
is free, it feels good, it tastes good,
makes you feel better, puts a twinkle
in your toes, makes you walk lighter,
and inspires you," he said smiling,
stressing that the word "play" is so
important. David added, "It's kind
of like shuffling along like a penguin
instead of waddling like a duck."
For those who have never played a
guitar before, the process of figuring
out how to start, without the proper
knowledge, is an intimidating task. It
may help to ask an experienced musi-
cian about what they went through
when they first started.
"Initially, learning how to play an
instrument can be an extremely frus-
trating process. When you start, your
first inclination is going to be that
you want to play the music you are
interested in right away," said LSA
junior Matt Aldridge, who has played
the clarinet and piano for seven and
six years respectively.
Regarding his playing experience,
Aldridge added, "Obviously, this can-
not happen and so frustration mounts.

Instead of letting the frustration deter
you from playing, use it as a form of
motivation and you will find great
rewards in your dedication."
Getting Started
When looking for a guitar to start
off with, there are a variety to choose
from, the most popular choice being
the six-string guitar.
Guitars come in all shapes and
sizes, either in electric or acoustic
models. They range in price with
the low-end models starting at $149,
while custom-made instruments are
priced around $5,500.
The phrase "you get what you pay
for" holds true when shopping for a
guitar. An experienced player knows
that the best guitars will cost a little
more.
However, when it comes to mid-
priced guitars, price doesn't neces-
sarily -determine the quality. One
should sit down and play as many
different brands and styles as needed
until a comfort level is found.
The Herb David Guitar Studio
sells a large collection of electric and
acoustic guitars. They have begin-
ning guitar kits - made by Fender
- available in both models.
The acoustic kit includes a Squirer
guitar, pitch pipe, nylon strap, picks,
gig bag and instructional booklet
for $116. Herb David offers in-store
setup and will tune and retune your
guitar.
The electric kit includes a Stra-
tocaster guitar, Frontman 15 amp,
tuner, strings, gig bag, electric cord
to plug into the amp and an instruc-
tional book, for $279.99.
For the beginner guitar player,
an acoustic guitar is ideal for learn-
ing. However, the downside to them

is that they are limited in what they
can do in terms of sound variation.
They also require a lot more care due
to their sensitivity to temperature and
humidity.
An acoustic guitar provides a
unique sound that comes from the
wood used in the body. Spruce,
maple, and mahogany woods are a
small sample of what can be found
on an acoustic. Different woods also
provide a variety of color, enhancing
the appearance and individualism of
the instrument. The sound produced
by an electric guitar is mainly based
on the instrument's pickup and the
amplifier that is being used.
Once a guitar is picked out, the
next step is figuring out how to play
it. Herb David provides an array of
16 instructors who are able to assist
in beginning instruction. There is an
instructor for just about every type
of music available. One can learn the
techniques of classical, blues, jazz,
rock, fusion, folk, country and fla-
menco guitar.
Lessons at Herb David are $20 for
a half-hour session. When looking
for a teacher, it is recommended to
choose two or three different genres
that may be of interest. Also, bring
along a schedule so that time slots
can easily be accommodated.
Even though it is highly sug-
gested to take at least two months
of lessons when starting off, there
are other forms of literature avail-
able to use when becoming familiar
with the guitar. Instructional books,
from chord shape dictionaries to all
the major scales on a guitar, provide
an easy, non-interactive method of
learning. These can be found at any
guitar store and most music stores.
Good luck becoming a rock star.

:.;;>:
<

10B
11B
1 2B

Cooking up a storm
Get dressed up with
a necktie skirt
Dance around
Ann Arbor
Rocking out with
the right guitar
Weekend
Entertainment with
Adam Rottenberg

I am a golden god.

EatingDis
Participants Nee
You may be eligible if you are:
A woman between the ages
"Currently experiencing any(
- Binge eating
-Vomiting or using laxat
eaten or to control wei
- Excessive exercising to
- Fasting
- Underweight because c
- Missing your menstrua
Participants will receive 20 weeks of psychot
Compensation up to $200 for participation.
The Possibilities Project at the University of Michigan Se
Professor Karen Stein. Ph.D., RN
For more information: 1-800-742-2300, #2200 or E-mail:
URL: www.umich.edu/-possibil

MAGAZINE

I

I

Writers: Christine Beamer,
Katie Marie Gates, Megan
Jacobs, Dan Marchese, Evan
McGarvey, Kathryn Rice
Photo Editors: Elise Bergman,
Tony Ding, Ryan Weiner
Photographers: Trevor
Campbell, Jason Cooper,
Cristina Fotieo, Mike Hulsebus
Shubra Ohri, Ali Olsen
Cover Art: Ali Olsen
Arts Editors: Jason Roberts,
Managing Editor
Adam Rottenberg, Editor
Editor in Chief: Jordan Schrader

...but can't get
CALL THE DELIVERY BUTLER
We deliver right to your door from
these local restaurants:

" Banh Na
" Banditos
" Bennie's Broasted
Chicken
" Brown Jug
" California Pizza
Kitchen
" Dynasty
" Harvest Deli
" Mancino's

" Miki Japanese
Seafood
" Paesano's
" Pelagos Tavern
" Quizno's
" TGI Fridays
" Smokehouse
Blues
" Red Lobster
" Ya Yas

i

RYNTAWE~tIER/Daily

>Mon.-Thurs.
Friday
Saturday

LSA junior Eryk Folmer demonstrates his skill at playing the six string guitar.

9 am-9:30 pm
9 am-l0 pm
4 pm-10 pm

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B

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