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January 24, 2005 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 2005-01-24

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The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday, January 24, 2005 - 3B

SUNDAY'S GAME
Indiana 61
FG FT REB
MIN M-A' M-A 0-T A F PTS
Branson 31 1-3 0-0 0-0 3 0 2
Gathing 18 1-2 2-2 1-4 0 2 4
Hawkins 37 6-7 4-5 2-10 1 5 16
Valentin 29 3-12 0-0 1-4 1 4 7
Stephenson20 2-6 0-0 0-3 3 3 4
Smith 24 4-7 0-0 0-2 0 0 11
Boyd 8 1-3 0-0 0-0 1 0 13
Enterline 28 3-8 5-6 1-2 5 3 11
Chapman 5 2-2 0-0 1-2 0 1 4
TEAM 3-5
Totals 20023-5011-13 9-32 1418 61
FG%: .460 FT%: .846 3-point FG: 4-17,
.235 (Smith 3-6, Valentin 1-4, Stephen-
son 0-4, Boyd 0-2, Enterline 0-1). Blocks:
3 (Hawkins 2, Branson) Steals: 7 (Valen-
tin 3, Chapman 2, Branson, Enterline).
Turnovers: 15 (Valentin 5, Stephenson
3, Enterline 2, TEAM 2, Boyd, Hawkins,
Gathing). Technical fouls: None.
MICHIGAN 63

FG
MIN M-A
Pool 39 7-16
Helvey 27 3-7
Walker 35 4-10
Starling 38 5-11
Clement 33 1-5
Flippin 7 0-0
. Cooper 15 2-5
McPhilamy 7 0-1
TEAM

FT
M-A
6-9
2-2
4-4
2-2
0-0
2-2
0-0
0-0

R EB
0-T
2-11
0-1
4-5
1-3
0-3
0-0
3-3
0-0
2-6

A
2
1
0
2
5
0
0
0

F PTS
2 21
4 8
2 12
1 14
1 2
2 2
0 4
0 0

Totals 200 22-5516-1912-31101263
FG%: .400 FT%: .842 3-point FG: 3-16,
.188 (Starling 2-7, Pool 1-6, Clement 0-
3). Blocks: 3 (Pool, Starling, Clement).
Steals: 4 (Pool 2, Starling 2). Turnovers:
12 (Pool 3, Starling 3, Cooper 2, Helvey,
Walker, Clement). Technical fouls: None.

WHAT DID YOU SAY?
"They celebrated like we
won the national title."
- Michigan coach Cheryl
Burnett on the Wolverines'
reaction after winning their
first game in over a month
Helvey 's'D
propels Blue
By Stephanie Wright
Daily Sports Writer
Just under eight minutes into the first half, Indiana guard
Cyndi Valentin made her first basket of the game - a short
jumper off an assist from Leah Enterline. The play sparked
a 10-5 run that let the Hoosiers reclaim a two-point lead
with three minutes left in the half.
It also marked the first Indiana possession in which Val-
entin wasn't guarded by Michigan forward Kelly Helvey.
Heading into yesterday's game, Michigan coach Cheryl
Burnett knew her team would have to contain Valentin to
snap its nine-game losing streak. One of the Big Ten's top
offensive threats, Valentin came into the game ranked fifth
in the conference with 16.7 points per game and had hit
almost 40 percent of her 3-point shots.
Burnett relied on Helvey - the Wolverines' most aggres-
sive defender - to shut her down.
"We came into the game knowing we had to stop (Valen-
tin), and Kelly Helvey again got the assignment," Burnett
said. "We said, 'Kelly, instead of switching out a lot, you
try to stay on her.' "
And except when she was resting on the bench, she
did. Helvey's tenacious defense held Valentin to just
seven points on 3-for-12 shooting, including 1-for-4 from
beyond the arc - her third-lowest scoring output of the
season. And while forwards Tabitha Pool and Janelle
Cooper guarded Valentin effectively at times, Helvey
deserved most of the credit.
Throughout the game, the 5-foot-Il forward stayed
close to the smaller Valentin, limiting her looks at the bas-
ket. And even when Indiana's offense dictated that another1
player guard Valentin, Helvey was still focused on stop-
ping her.
Early in the second half, Valentin had the ball on the
perimeter and looked to make a move toward the basket
past Michigan forward BreAnne McPhilamy. Helvey rotat-
ed over and batted the ball away from Valentin, regain-
ing possession for the Wolverines. That kind of hustle by
Helvey forced Valentin to turn over the ball five times, her1
highest such total of the season.
"(Michigan) did a good job," Indiana coach Kathi Ben-
nett said. "(Valentin) didn't have one of her better days.4
They ... took her out of the game."1
Bennett quickly cited Valentin's foul trouble as an addi-
tional reason why she was not a factor in the game. Valen-i
tin committed four fouls, the last coming with nearly eight;
minutes remaining in the second half. Her early foul trou-
ble not only caused her to log just 29 minutes, after playing
the full 40 in her last three games, but also forced her toI
play with less intensity on offense and defense. That tenta-

YESTERDAY'S SCORE
Indiana

61
63

Winter weather calls
for Starter nostalgia

Michigan

Michigan.................28
Penn State...........29

33 - 61
34 - 63

At: Crisler Arena
Attendance: 1,703
BIG TEN STANDINGS

Team

Big Ten Overall

Vi1/11 Yls 14'11 V fGl Qll

Penn State
Ohio State
Minnesota
Michigan State
Purdue
Iowa
Illinois
. Wisconsin
Indiana
Michigan
Northwestern

7
6
6
5
4
3
3
1
1
1
1

0
1
1
2
3
4
4
5
6
6
6

12
19
16
16
11
14
11
7
8
5
4

6
2
3
3
7
4
6
9
9
13
16

DANIEL BREMMER/Daily
Kelly Helvey held Cyndi Valentin to just seven points.
tiveness prevented Valentin from driving to the basket and
drawing the foul, a move she has depended on for points.
Valentin is third in the Big Ten in free-throw percentage,
hitting .883 of her shots from the charity stripe. Against
Michigan, Valentin did not make it to the line for just the
third time this season.
While Burnett stressed that it took a solid team effort
to stop Valentin, Helvey appreciated being the player most
responsible for containing her.
"I like to take (the pressure) on myself," Helvey said. "I
want to be the one that if she scores, it's my fault. I'm going
to do my best not to let her score."
Helvey's strong defensive performance - coupled
with her eight points on 3-for-7 shooting - represent-
ed the second straight game in which she has improved
from her early season struggles. Helvey averaged just
5.1 points on 12-for-36 shooting through the Wolver-
ines' first five Big Ten games. In Michigan's 73-49 loss
at Minnesota on Thursday, Helvey scored 11 points and
notched four steals.
But being able to shut down Indiana's best player in a
Michigan victory meant the most to her.
"That's a lot of pride for me," Helvey said.

While the snow continued
to pour down on Satur-
day afternoon, my stom-
ach continued to growl. Weather.
com's -2 wind chill quelled my
starvation through a few episodes
of BET's Fresh Prince-athon, but
when my belly began to roar like
Clubber Lang (a.k.a. Mr. T) in the
final fight scene of Rocky III, I
thought it was time to venture 18
steps away from my Church Street
home to the closest eatery, Univer-
sity Cafe.
And so the layering commenced.
But as I put
on my under-
shirt, short-
sleeve shirt,
long-sleevea
shirt, Jurassic.
5 sweatshirt
and North
Face jacket, I E GENNARO
couldn't help FILICE
but ask myself, The SportsMonday
Isn't there a Column
better way?
And out
of nowhere, I was reminiscing
about 1995. Not because of the O.J.
Simpson trial or even Jerky Boys:
The Movie. Rather, I found myself
evoking a winter one decade ago
because that was when I owned the
most prolific article of winter sport-
ing apparel ever ...
The Starter jacket.
That's right - that oversized,
puffy, half-zip, hooded pullover
that took America by storm in the
early/mid '90s; the jacket that was
embraced by people of all regions,
social classes, races, religions, creeds,
ages and genders.
In 1995, nobody had to worry
about lengthy preparation time or
annoying tugging and rearrang-
ing, all of which are common side
effects of multiple layers of cloth-
ing. A three-toned Starter parka
(not the light-weight, full-zipper
model) boasted maximum insula-
tion and warmth while providing
unparalleled comfort.
The iPod my parents gave me for
Christmas two years ago came close
but fell short of dethroning what is
still the greatest Christmas present
I ever received - my blue and gold
California Golden Bears Starter
jacket.
From Dec. 25, 1994 through all of
1995, I lived in this nylon heaven. The
northern California weather hardly
ever hit temperatures that really
demanded a jacket, but the parka
joined my Adidas Sambas as everyday
pieces of my wardrobe.
While the hood's drawstring
adjusters became hot commodities
in every middle school homeroom,
my favorite part of the jacket was
its definitive kangaroo pouch. A
seemingly infinite amount of space
to my prepubescent paws, this pock-
et located at the front of the jacket
held pretty much everything I need-
ed as a sixth grader: baseball cards,
the latest edition of Slam magazine,
a packet of Fun Dip candy and a can
of Jolt Cola.
But my main reason for sport-
ing the jacket was that it was the
ultimate display of fanfare. While

a T-shirt or hat indicated fondness
toward a certain team, the Starter
jacket - available in many colleges
and every team from America's
big four professional sports - por-
trayed Shakespearian passion
toward your favorite squad.
Not every Starter jacket represented
its owner's dearest team, though.
Color scheme and mascot/logo
popularity took precedence over team
allegiance for many folks. This led to
certain teams making jacket appear-
ances in random areas. And there
were two teams that seemed to be
heavily represented in all 50 states:
the Charlotte Hornets and the Dallas
Cowboys.
The astronomical popularity of the
Hornets edition was easy to under-
stand. Besides the fact that 1995 was
the pinnacle of the teal uniform era
- something that the Detroit Pistons
caught in its recession - the jacket
featured that cracked-out, basket-
ball-dribbling hornet mascot. But the
esteem for the Dallas jacket was a bit
harder to comprehend.
While the Cowboys are supposedly
"America's team" and the '90s was
their most dominant period, the team
had a Notre Dame quality to it - you
either loved the 'Boys with all your
heart or absolutely despised them
- so it's hard to see how the jacket
gained mass appeal. The color-scheme
wasn't unique (blue, silver and white)
and the logo was nothing special
(a big blue star). But, like Michael
Irvin's lightening-striped fade, the
jacket became the ultimate fashion
statement.
When the popularity of the first
series of parkas began to waver,
the company struck sequel gold by
introducing the alternate black ver-
sions. These revised Starters hung
around for a few years but couldn't
carry the corporation into the new
millennium.
It's hard to say why this fad came
to an end as the '90s rolled on. Maybe
it had something to do with the gang
violence that coexisted with the jacket
(stories of Starter muggings highlight-
ed the news on an almost daily basis);
maybe it had something do with Apex
introducing knockoff Starter jackets
and flooding the market. But this
fashion super-fad crashed harder than
Zubas pants.
Every once in a while, I'll spot
a middle-aged man who shares
my Starter nostalgia (the jacket
reappears in the Big House every
November), and this reinforces my
own wistfulness.
When I reached high school, my
momma was feeling charitable and
gave my Cal Starter to my younger
cousin. To this day, I haven't
excused this unbelievably ignorant
act.
So as the legendary Michigan win-
ter pounds Ann Arbor, I long for the
good old days when every sports fan
(and trendsetter alike) effortlessly
braved anything Mother Nature con-
cocted with comfort, style and notable
puffiness.
Gennaro Filice doesn't really hold
any grudges against his mother and
loves her with all his heart. He can be
reached at gfilice@umich.edu

THIS WEEKEND'S RESULTS:
Michigan 63, INDIANA 61
PENN STATE 73, Michigan State 56
Ohio State 71, NORTHWESTERN 59
Purdue 79, IOWA 75
MINNESOTA 80, ILLINOIS 68
WEDNESDAY'S GAME
Purdue at Michigan State 7 p.m.
THURSDAY'S GAMES
Michigan at Iowa 7:05 p.m.
Ohio State at Wisconsin 7 p.m.
Indiana at Illinois 7 p.m.
Penn State at Northwestern 7 p.m.

SATURDAY'S GAMES
Michigan at Wisconsin
Penn State at Minnesota
Purdue at Northwestern
Ohio State at Illinois
Michigan State at Indiana

2 p.m.
12 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.

HOOSIERS
Continued from page 1B
take the lead 61-60, but Pool made
sure that it would be the last time
Indiana (1-6, 8-9) had control of the
game.
Pool's athletic ability took over
again. She blew past another Indi-
ana defender to hit the game win-

'M' STATS

Player
Pool
Walker
Starling
Helvey
Flippin
Clement
Dierdorf
Cooper
McPhilamy
Moore

G
18
18
18
18
18
18
9
18
18
2

Min
36.4
27.7
19.2
26.8
23.3
26.7
11.1
24.7
11.1
1.0

A
2.2
0.2
1.1
2.4
1.9
3.8
0.2
0.9
0.0
0.0

Reb
9.0
3.8
2.3
4.1
1.4
2.4
2.1
3.3
3.3
0.0

Pts
16.7
13.5
5.9
5.6
5.1
5.1
4.3
4.2
1.5
0.0

ning layup with 46 seconds left,
putting Michigan up 62-61. Indiana
turned the ball over with 32 sec-
onds remaining, and M ichigan ran
the time out. When Pool grabbed a
rebound off freshman Krista Clem-
ent's missed shot with 0.3 seconds
left, the Wolverines finally sealed
their first victory since Dec. 11
against IUPUI.
"I'm so proud of our kids because
of so many of the things we have
worked on," Burnett said. "(We)
stopped the drive, executed offen-
sively. We kept our composure when
every possession was critical."
Controlling the ball with 11:30
left, Pool missed a long 3-pointer
but followed her shot to grab the
offensive rebound. Pool fell to the
ground and looked like she was get-
ting tied up. Before Indiana could
force the jumpball, Pool shoveled
the ball to freshman Janelle Cooper,
who was also on the ground. Just as
Cooper got the ball, she tapped it to
a cutting Becky Flippin, who drew
a foul. That effort typified how the
team played throughout the game
and the losing streak.
"We had some really great effort
(plays)," Burnett said. "The kid who
had more hustle plays than anybody
was Jessica Starling. She's on the
floor, really giving us a lot of effort.
I always want to appreciate the fans
too, because if we do something

hustle-wise they really try to carry
us the next play. We talked about
out-hustling Indiana."
With Michigan hustling on every
possession, diving after the loose
balls and protecting the ball better,
the Wolverines had more offensive
possessions. Michigan took advan-
tage of the extra plays to get addi-
tional shots and kept Indiana on its
heels.
"If you eliminate turnovers, we will
be executing more," Pool said.
But the other key to the game was
the defense of Michigan on Indiana's
junior guard Cyndi Valentin. Val-
entin came in averaging almost 17
points and five rebounds per game.
Michigan gave the difficult duty
of covering the 5-foot-8 guard to
Helvey. Helvey embraced the chal-
lenge, holding Valentin to just seven
points on 3-for-12 shooting:
"] liked taking it on myself," Helvey
said. "(She) had (seven) points, and
that's a lot of pride for me."
With the Michigan defense con-
taining the Hoosiers' best player,
and the offense reducing its mis-
takes, the Wolverines got their first
Big Ten victory. The whole team
felt like its effort in practice finally
resulted in a victory that will carry
into upcoming games.
"We knew that, through our hard
work in practice, that (effort) would
pay off," Clement said.

KEY STAT
12
Number of turnovers commit-
ted by Michigan yesterday. This
was the Wolverines' best per-
formance since they committed
just 7 against Drake Nov. 30.

3~~~~~~~~m MM..... I..!. . - p..M.MMoo.

Welcome Students... Belatedly
FOOD FOR THOUGHT
I am an Ann Arbor businessman - and a Vietnam Vet. The found-
ing principle of Vietnam Veterans of America is: Never again will
one generation of veterans abandon another
We Vietnam Vets live by that creed, and as such, I run ads that
attempt to dispel the myths of the Vietnam War and the Protest
Movement. You have probably heard all of your life that the Pro-
test Movement ended the Vietnam War. In coming weeks I will
quote a few people and pose a few questions that will hopefully
cause you to think for yourself and not blindly accept the propa-
ganda that is often taught as historic fact.
Why, you might ask, would someone not in the education indus-
try spend a lot of personal money on advertisements that will not
generate income? The answer is I feel an obligation to those who
died, those who suffered in other ways from the protestors and
those who serve in our military today.
Those who died deserve to have the truth told about them. Those
who suffered homelessness, addiction and PTSD, deserve to be

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