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January 18, 2005 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2005-01-18

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NEWS

The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 18, 2005 - 7A

COLEMANUniversi
COLEMAN thes
the ad m
Continued from page 3 half of
her friends are thinking of applying to the Univ
the University, but added that she could fewer p
understand that some minorities would thought
want to attend southern schools because the Uni
of the perception of a more positive "Even
atmosphere for blacks. (affirma
Sekou Watkins, a junior from Renais- he said.
sance High School, agreed. Admi
"I think minorities are more interested one con
in historically black colleges - they feel students
more comfortable with more African applicati
Americans," he said. Coler
Duane Miller, a senior at Renaissance of advic
High School said he has applied to the "Kee[
CODE thi
with (Pr
Continued from page 1 meeting
which) the type of justice you get is the with he
kind of justice you pay for," he said. vince he
Despite SRAC's decision, Josh we'll be
Gewolb, chair of MSA's Code of Conduct Mahajan
Advisory Committee, said he believes The r
Coleman will decide to pass the amend- be votin
ment because the University of Iowa, dural an
where she was president before coming For exa
to the University of Michigan, allows stu- Universi
dents to hire attorneys to represent them Resoluti
in all types of hearings. that enfo
"I'm sure President Coleman will about th
agree that there's no reason students at that are 1
Michigan should have fewer rights than Gewo
those at Iowa," Gewolb said. vote to
Priya Mahajan, an LSA junior and posals. F
co-chair of MSA's Student Rights Com- how the
mittee, said if MSA is given the chance "For t
to speak with Coleman it may be able to week the
convince her to approve the proposal. substanc
Overtur
BAMN sstates th
Continued from page 1 petition,
legitimacy. Driver said the petitions were stated in
gathered in a deceptive way. Rackh
"People were deceived (because of BAMN',
the language). Also people who were on MCRI f
parole were the people who circulated said BA
the petitions. We want to find out if Klan to the El
members circulated the petitions, because meeting
they're in support of it," Driver said. it will no
She added that for the next six weeks, Royal
BAMN will concentrate on getting at prevent
least 100,000 people who signed the first in 2006,
petition to sign a separate petition issued strategie
by BAMN, called "Fraud Must Not bly havin
the michigan daily
S LEASING FOR FALL '05. Efficiencies 1 FULLY F
bdrm., 2 bdrm., 618 & 624 Packard & 820 a park.
Ann & S. Main. 734-260-3619. May- Aug

ity, but has not yet heard from
aissions office. Miller said about
his friends have also applied to
versity. He said he hadn't noticed
people applying, but said he
the decline could be a result of
versity's admissions lawsuit.
n the discussion of getting rid of
tive action) is offensive to some,"
issions officers also held one-on-
sultations with the high school
on helpful changes to their
ions.
man left the students with a word
e.
p your eye on the ball and work
nk if we are able to actually talk
resident Coleman) and to have a
or some type of inside channel
r that we should be able to con-
er to approve it. But I'm not sure
able to (meet with Coleman),"
n said.
emaining proposals SRAC will
g on include a variety of proce-
nd record-keeping amendments.
mple, MSA is asking, that the
ity's Office of Student Conflict
on - the administrative body
orces the code - release statistics
e number of rape and drug cases
brought before it.
lb said he is confident SRAC will
recommend the remaining pro-
But, Harper said she was unsure
committee would vote.
he issues that are coming up next
ere is no disagreement about the
ce, but about whether it is appro-
n Civil Rights Law". This petition
at there was deception in MCRI's
and that the initiative should be
clearer language.
ham student Ben Royal said
s primary goal is to prevent
rom getting on the ballot. Royal
MN plans to present its petition
ection Committee, which will be
in six to eight weeks, in hopes that
ot validate MCRI's signatures.
added that if BAMN fails to
MCRI from being on the ballot
there are a number of other legal
s they will pursue - most nota-
ng MCRI revised for the ballot so

through road blocks in your path. Do not
be defined by your circumstances but
instead define them," she said.
Steven Kemp and Jackie Lewis-
Kemp's son is a student at Detroit Coun-
try Day School. They both expressed
excitement about the opportunities avail-
able at the University.
"This effort is phenomenal. For the
president to come and recruit these stu-
dents will be very helpful," Lewis-Kemp
said.
Coordinator of Executive Communi-
cations Deborah Meyers Greene said the
University will be releasing the number
of minority applications that were sub-
mitted this year on Wednesday.
priate to include them in the code," Harp-
er said.
Recently, SRAC, OSCR and MSA
have disagreed on what types of amend-
ments and proposals should be included
in the student code of conduct. Members
of OSCR and SRAC have argued that
several of MSA's proposals are of a pro-
cedural nature and should not be included
in the code of conduct.
"(OSCR) is in favor of the amendments
that are left," said Keith Elkin, the direc-
tor of OSCR. "Where we differ is that on
four of them the question is whether or
not they belong in the statement. They
look more like implementing the policy
as oppose to the policy itself."
MSA can propose amendments to
the University's student code of conduct
every two years. The code's purpose is to
outline the University's expectations for
students and also to define what will hap-
pen to a student who violates the code.
that the language is clear and plain.
Driver said that in cities like Houston,
where MCRI had been forced to revise
the language of its initiative when collect-
ing signatures, people had voted against
the initiative because the wording made
it clear that it was a vote against affirma-
tive action.
Stephanie Newsone, a student from
Charles L. Spain Junior High School,
said she was happy to be part of the event
despite the cold weather.
"We wanted to support equality of our
nation and all nations that are segregated
from others. (We want to) stop segregat-
ing in America," Newsone said.

SPEAKER
Continued from page 1
"We must invest in smaller class sizes,
provide more technology and endow the
principals with the leadership to take on
these issues."
Cisneros also said in order for Ameri-
ca to enliven its urban centers, "we must
also reduce the contentiousness between
America's cities and suburbs."
For example, many major cities in the
Northern United States struggle with
problems such as homelessness and
lack of affordable housing. Historically,
these problems have stemmed from
the middle class workers leaving urban
centers and moving to the suburbs, said
Cisneros.
He added that recent developments in
several major cities, such as encourag-
ing the entertainment venues to relocate
to downtown areas, are causing many
who work in urban development to be
optimistic that middle class Americans
will once again return to these urban
areas.
"Chicago, which had lost population
for five censuses in a row, has now seen
their population increasing," he said.
He also pointed out cities such as
Houston, which he said boasts the
number one urban school system in the
AUTO SHOW
Continued from page 1
holding out for the massive BMW
760i sedan, with a V12 engine and
$117,995 sticker price. It's Winston's
second time at the show, and he vows
never to miss it.
"The atmosphere here is great. To be
a part of one of the world's biggest auto
shows - it's amazing," Winston said.
The public opening followed a week
of press, industry and charity previews.
The show, which runs through Jan.

country.
"Detroit and Los Angeles are
rebuilding their central cities as
well," he said.
To open the lecture, Cisneros com-
memorated the history of the civil rights
movement, describing racial struggles
throughout the history of the United
States. He gave detailed descriptions of
African American tribulations during
the Atlantic Slave Trade, the Civil War,
Jim Crow Laws and the Civil Rights
Movement of the 1960s.
The 1956 Montgomery Bus Boy-
cott, he said, paved the way for King
to emerge as the nation's most promi-
nent civil rights leader. During the
boycott, African Americans in Mont-
gomery, Alabama "made the decision
to boycott the bus system until it would
change is (segregation) practices,"
Cisneros said.
He recounted how King organized
lectures and marchers to peacefully pro-
test the segregation laws. He described
the crossing of the Selma bridge, where
marchers were met by "vicious dogs and
fire hoses."
"Literally, old women (were being)
blown away by the full power of fire
hoses, tumbling across the street and
getting hurt," he said.
After King's assassination, Cisneros
23, is spread across 700,000 square
feet of the downtown arena. More
than 700 vehicles are on display,
many spinning slowly on elevated or
fenced-in turntables beneath giant
corporate logos.
A bright green Jeep hangs verti-
cally, as if scaling the huge rock wall
and waterfall behind it. Men crowd
around displayed engines and chassis,
pointing, explaining and quizzing, and
visitors aim digital cameras at concept
cars, interiors, insignia and friends who
climb behind the wheels.

said, public lawmakers responded by
"passing laws outlawing segregation in
so many places," and starting organi-
zations like Head Start and other early
childhood education programs.
Excited about Martin Luther King Jr.
Day, students and staff received the lec-
ture with enthusiasm.
"I thought he was really good. I want-
ed to hear what he had to say, especially
tying into equality," Kathy Friedrichs,
who works in the School of Engineering
and attends the memorial lecture annu-
ally, said.
While the memorial lecture was the
main event for the day, other prominent
speakers also visited the University
to speak in remembrance of Dr. King.
U.S Circuit Judge Harry Edwards spoke
this afternoon to a capacity crowd- at
Hutchins Hall. Edwards discussed his
latest article, "The Journey from Brown
v. Board of Education to Grutter v. Bol-
linger: From Racial Assimilation to
Diversity."
Taking lead from his educational
and professional background, Edwards
explored the evolution of racial rela-
tions in the United States. Society has
changed, he said, from an environment
where blacks were forced to assimilate
to white culture to a forum where diver-
sity is encouraged.
Diana Teng had a friend snap her
photo in the drivers seat of a $77,000
champagne-colored BMW 6-series
convertible. The 26-year-old health
department worker from Toronto has
been having trouble with the Mercedes
C-Class she bought last year, and is
keeping her eye out for something new.
She said the show is a great way to
get ideas.
"I don't come here to look at the cars
on the road," Teng said. Her criteria for
a new car? "Prettiness. And if it goes
fast, that's a bonus."

U U

FOOD FOR THOUGHT
The Vietnam Protestors
Yung Krall, author of A Thou-
sand Tears Falling, is the
daughter of the Viet Cong
ambassador to Moscow. Yung
once told a UM audience that
North Vietnam was within
three days of surrender,
but the protest movement
forced a halt to the bombing
and the war dragged on
for years. Did the protes-
tors save or cost lives?
Gary Lillie & Assoc., Realtors
www.garylillie.com

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MCKINLEY STREET: SPACIOUS 1 & 2
bdrm. apts., bay windows, fireplace, bale.,
A/C, covered prkg. A private shuttle to North
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NEAR KERRYTOWN! GREAT location!
Spacious studio & I bdrm. apts. Avail. Fall!
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NEAR UNION: LARGE contemporary stu-
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RIVER'S EDGE APARTMENTS! 1 mo.
free! Why pay the high A2 prices? Ypsilanti
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apply online at www.riversedge.org
RIVERHOUSE CONDO, 2 bdrm., carpet
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FURNISHED CAMPUS APARTMENTS
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Large 2 bdrm. apts. in modem buildings.
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MEDIA COORDINATOR
Growing Ann Arbor healthcare company has
a P/T entry-level position with our in-house
advertising agency. This position will assist
the Media Buyer with broadcast, print and on-
line media buying activities. Candidate will
perform ad response reporting, research, traf-
fic and clerical functions. Exc. organizational
and analytical skills req.; interest in the busi-
ness side of advertising a plus. Must be com-
puter literate and proficient in Excel. For con-
sideration please e-mail cover letter with
salary requirements to:
recruiter@foresthealth.com or fax to
734-547-1281. EOE.
OFFICE OF NEW Student Programs is now
hiring students for summer. Positions will be
40 hrswk. at $7.25/hr. Job will include as-
sisting students and parents with orientation
registration, answering of telephones, and
special projects. Must be friendly, motivated
and willing to provide information/assis-
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uary 21st at 3511 Student Activities Building.
RECEPTIONIST, P/T. DO you pride your-
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Please fax resume to 734-997-7131 or call
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FREE RENT IN exchange for P/T nanny &
light house cleaning. Working, single dad
seeking PIT help for 5 yr. old boy (Tues.night
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