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November 04, 2004 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2004-11-04

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8A - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, November 4, 2004

NEWS

0

THE DAY

AFTER

REUNITING THE COUNTRY
"Reaching these goals will require the broad
support of Americans, so today I want to speak to
every person who voted for my opponent. To make
this nation stronger and better, I will need your

BOWING OUT
"Don't lose faith, what you did made a difference.
And building on itself, we will go on to make a
difference another day. I promise you that time will
come.... And it's worth fighting for."
- Democratic candidate John Kerry
concedes yesterday
Kerry states
SCalifornia

*

support and I will work to
- President Bush,
Bush states
Alaska
Arizona
Alabama
Arkansas
Colorado
Florida

earn it."
victory speech yesterday

U
U
U

Connecticut

40

Delaware
District of Columbia

Illinois

U
U

Georgia
Idaho

Hawaii
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan

Indiana
Kansas
Kentuck'
Louisian
Mississil
Missouri
Montana
NebraskE

;y

U
U
U
U

Minnesota
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York

3

:a

Nevada
North Carolina

Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
Vermont
Washington
Wisconsin

0

U'
U
U;
U;
U

North Dakota
Oklahoma
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee

Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Wyoming

40

President Bush stands with his family and Vice President Dick Cheney
before a roaring crowd of his supporters prior to delivering his accep-
tance speech in the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington yesterday.

Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry waves to supporters with
his wife Teresa Heinz Kerry at his side after delivering his concession
speech at Faneull Hall in Boston yesterday.

I
I

National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice, left, and chief strategist Karen Hughes await President
Bush's acceptance speech in the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington yesterday.

A tired crowd lingers at Copley Square in Boston, hoping to see John Kerry or at least learn who the
president will be, in the wee hours of the morning yesterday.

4

Republicans strengthen hold on U.S. House, Senate

'The red states

get

redder and the blue states

get

bluer'

WASHINGTON (AP) - A triumphant phalanx of
conservative candidates paved the way as Republicans
used Election Day to strengthen their grip on Congress
and vanquish one of the Democrats' most visible national
leaders.
As undecided races in the House and Senate dwindled to a
handful, both chambers' GOP leaders rejoiced in their added
muscle. In the next Congress, Republicans will have at least
231 seats and probably one more for what would be a three-
seat pickup in the 435-member House.
The GOP will control the new Senate 55 to 44 plus a Dem-
ocratic-leaning independent, a four-seat gain.
"Last night was a monumental victory for the United States
Senate," said Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.).
Frist, who will still need to muster 60 votes to fend off
Democratic filibusters that can derail bills, spoke during a
whirlwind one-day victory lap through four of the five south-
ern states where Republicans grabbed seats from retiring
Senate Democrats.
The GOP's favorite scalp was that of Senate Minority
Leader Tom Daschle of South Dakota, the 18-year Sen-

SENATE

HOUSE

Republican
Democrat

Underscoring the conservative tide, the National Rifle
Association said 14 of the 18 Senate candidates and 241 of
the 251 House candidates it endorsed had won. It circulated
long lists of incoming House and Senate freshmen it consid-
ered "pro-gun."
Sen. Lincoln Chafee (R-R.I.), perhaps the Senate's most
moderate Republican, told The Providence Journal that he
might switch parties if President Bush were re-elected. "I'm
not ruling it out," he said.
Chafee spokesman Stephen Hourahan yesterday seemed
to try tamp down rumblings of a switch, saying of his boss,
"He has no intention of making an announcement of any-
thing in the near future."
Moderate Republicans took note of what happened and
began staking out their territory.
The likely new chairman of the Senate Judiciary Com-
mittee, moderate Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.), warned the
White House against trying to fill any upcoming Supreme
Court vacancies with judges who would oppose abortion
rights or invite Democrats to block them for being too
conservative.

4

55+4 E Republican 231 +4
44-4 Democrat 200-3

9 Independent I

*Independent I
* *ndecided 3

A

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