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December 09, 2004 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2004-12-09

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NATION/WORLD
Congress NEWS IN BRIEF
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WASHINGTON (AP) - Congress
esterday ordered the biggest overhaul
f U.S. intelligence in a half-century,
,placing a network geared to the Cold
Var fight against communism with a
ost-Sept. 11 structure requiring mili-
iry and civilian spy agencies to work
)gether against terrorists intent on
oly war.
The Senate overwhelmingly passed
he legislation 89 to 2, one day after the
louse easily pushed through the com-
romise strongly endorsed by Presi-
,nt Bush.
"The world has changed," said Sen.
oseph Lieberman (D-Conn). "Our ter-
orist enemies today make no distinc-
on between soldiers and civilians,
etween foreign and domestic loca-
ons when they attack us."
The Sept. 11 terrorist attacks three
ears ago on New York City and Wash-
ngton, which killed nearly 3,000
eople, proved that the intelligence
peration established in World War
I and modified afterward to fight
ommunism wasn't effective enough
gainst the threats of the new century,
enators said yesterday.
"We are rebuilding a structure that
as designed for a different enemy at
different time, a structure that was
esigned for the Cold War and has not
roved agile enough to deal with the
hreats of the 21st century," said Sen-
te Governmental Affairs chairwoman
usan Collins, (R-Maine).
Sens. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.) and
ames Inhofe (R-Okla.) voted against
he bill, with Byrd saying that it was
oly to expect a law to make America
afer from foreign terrorists.
"No legislation alone can forestall
terrorist attack on our nation," Byrd
aid.
Outside the Senate doors were sev-
ral of the family members who had
obbied Congress carrying pictures of
heir loved ones who died in Pennsyl-
ania, the World Trade Center or the
entagon.
"I don't think we've really digested
yet," said Mary Fetchet, a social
orker from New Canaan, Conn.,
hose 24-year-old son Brad died at
he World Trade Center. "It's been very
:motional."
KING
ontinued from page 1A
tumbling through rearranged clas-
ics and mediocre new material in a
oice strangled by years of substance
buse. Last night, King made it clear
e has no intention of dedicating his
areers later years to weakness.
After an extended instrumen-
at introduction by his eight-piece
ackup group, King gracefully
escended onto the stage. Putting his
ustom guitar, affectionately labeled
Lucille," on his lap, King took to
is center-stage throne. The fact that
ing remained seated did nothing
o mute the energy of the mature
nd passionate sounds that echoed
hroughout the performance.
The sounds of King's guitar as
well as the seasoned horns, drums,
.eyboards and bass were more than
nough to affirm the legitimacy of
King's near-deity status in the musi-
al world. The backup crew did a
ery credible, and at times impres-
ive, job of keeping up with the blues
ehemoth, but King made certain,
vith his lively delivery of jokes and
iffs, that all eyes remained stead-
astly on him.
While King's graceful playing
nd resonant voice will always be

he highlight of his performances,
he most surprising aspect of his
presence was his rejection of the
arrogance typical of acts of his
tatus. Throughout the show, King
playfully cracked jokes about his
age, his music and his audience. The
audience responded to this banter, as
well as a number of physical antics
ncluding kissing the microphone,
nd hoisting a glass of beer to the
audience before downing it in one
gulp, with continuously increasing
applause and excitement.
He had the audience clapping and
inging along to a quickly improvised
am before launching into his clas-
ic, "When Love Comes to Town,'
first made popular by its inclusion
on U2's 1988 release, "Rattle and
Hum." The opening licks of this
song were enough to clear away any
ingering doubt that the gracious and
heartfelt sounds of King's patented
guitar have hardly deteriorated since
his career was born in the studios of
Memphis. One look at the sometimes

KIEV, Ukraine
Parliament approves election reforms
Parliament approved reforms yesterday to ensure a fair ballot in Ukraine's repeat
presidential election as tens of thousands of opposition supporters, many of them
haggard and shivering after 17 days of round-the-clock street protests, chanted and
danced in triumph.
The surprise vote in parliament was part of a compromise package that also
included constitutional amendments to transfer some presidential powers to parlia-
ment - but only after parliamentary elections in 2006, when backers of opposition
leader Viktor Yushchenko hope to win a majority.
Yushchenko had earlier denounced the amendments as an attempt to render his
likely election victory meaningless, but he appeared to have ended up strengthen-
ing his political standing by demonstrating an ability to find common ground with
his opponents and solve a crisis that could easily have turned violent.
"During these 17 days we have gotten a new country," Yushchenko told the roar-
ing crowds on Kiev's main Independence Square. "We have realized that we are a
European nation. We have grown confident that Ukraine's future can't be stolen."
JERUSALEM
Settlers ask to keep communities together
Residents of some Jewish settlements in the northern Gaza Strip have pro-
posed that their entire communities be moved to locations inside Israel under
Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's plan to withdraw from Gaza next year, a law-

maker said yesterday.
A resident said the settlers want to remain together outside Gaza, a sign that a
significant number of the 8,200 settlers slated for evacuation next year are resigned
to leaving Gaza, despite vocal opposition by settler leaders. Some have quietly
formed committees to negotiate their exit.
Nissim Slomianski, a lawmaker with the pro-settlement National Religious
Party, who met with settler representatives on Tuesday, said they remained
opposed to Sharon's withdrawal plan, but want to remain together if they are
forced to leave.
"I don't want to give the impression that they are ready to leave," he said. "How-
ever, if there is a situation where they are taken out by force, then they want to move
as an entire community."
CAMP BUEHRING, Kuwait
Rumsfeld hears soldiers' criticism of U.S. Army
In a rare public airing of grievances, disgruntled soldiers complained to Defense
Secretary Donald Rumsfeld yesterday about long deployments and a lack of
armored vehicles and other equipment.
"You go to war with the Army you have," Rumsfeld replied, "not the Army you
might want or wish to have."
Spc. Thomas Wilson had asked the defense secretary, "Why do we soldiers have to
dig through local landfills for pieces of scrap metal and compromised ballistic glass
to up-armor our vehicles?" Shouts of approval and applause arose from the estimated
2,300 soldiers who had assembled to see Rumsfeld. "We do not have proper armored
vehicles to carry with us north," Wilson, 31, of Nashville, Tenn., said.
SAN ANTONIO
New breast cancer drug shows better results
A newer drug prevented far more breast cancers from recurring in older women,
with far fewer side effects, than the old standby tamoxifen doctors said yesterday, cit-
ing a new study. Cancer specialists said Arimidex is likely to become the first-choice
treatment for most women who have had the disease, and they predicted a wider role for
similar drugs of its type, called aromatase inhibitors.
New research suggests Arimidex might be able to prevent 70 percent to 80 percent
of the most common type of tumors that occur in women after menopause, compared
with the 50 percent that tamoxifen is credited with warding off.
- Compiled from Daily wirkreports
MARKET UPDATE .
WED. CLOSE CHANGE
DOW JONES 10,494.23 +53.65
NASDAQ 2,126.11 + 2.99
S&P 500 1,182.81 -5.74
I I
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