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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, November 12, 2003 - 7

CLUBS
Continued from Page 1
to exist at the University. "It's a volun-
tary process," McGovern said. Clubs
who do register with MSA gain privi-
leges such as funding and room usage,
but there are also many clubs on cam-
pus that have not registered.
Even though no stipulations explicit-
ly state that clubs must have an estab-
lished purpose, McGovern said MSA
could disband groups that do not hold
any meetings.
She explained if an organization's
name does not accurately describe the
activities of the club, MSA can cancel
it. Because of this, an organization reg-
istered under MSA that does not hold
any activities at all could be mislead-
ing of its club's name and then could
be revoked of its MSA privileges.
Furthermore, MSA Treasurer Elliot
Wells-Reid said if a club is misusing
its MSA funds, the assembly can not
only revoke the club's status, but also
issue a fine.
"But a lot of this (club validity)
relies on honesty," added McGovern.
University admissions officers also
have to rely on the honesty of its appli-
cants when admitting students. Univer-
sity spokeswoman Julie Peterson said
no university could check every refer-
ence on all the applications it receives.
"We have to rely on the honor system,"
she added.
This year, undergraduate admissions
at the University have attempted to pre-
vent students from falsifying extra-cUr-
ricular activities on their applications.
Peterson said the undergraduate appli-
cation now asks students to list the clubs
they have joined in order of their impor-
tance to them, making it more detailed
and harder to falsify. "This provides a
more personal view for us, and then they
also have to write something about why
it's important to them," she said.
James Hayes, associate director of
admissions at the undergraduate Busi-
ness School, said the school checks its
applicants' transcripts and recommen-

dations on a random basis. But the
Business School does not verify infor-
mation about club involvement."We
just don't have enough time. There's
not enough man power," Hayes said.
But Hayes said extracurricular infor-
mation about the student is still very
important to the application process.
The Career Center at the University
also does not verify the resumes of its
registered students. Lynne Sebille-
White, assistant director of recruitment
services at the Career Center, said the
large number of students registered
there makes checking them all impos-
sible. "However, before students can
register they have to read and agree to
a falsification agreement, attesting that
they understand all the statements they
provide (to the career center) have to
be true," she said.
"If it is found that they have violated
the policy, then there are serious rami-
fications;' she said. Students in viola-
tion can no longer use the Career
Center's services.
Sebille-White said students should
be aware that employers thoroughly
verify the information of its employ-
ees. She added the Career Center has
had few problems with the integrity of
resumes.
While most University students
don't create clubs to fill their resumes,
they do join many student organiza-
tions in order to boost them. Moreover,
some students join a student organiza-
tion only for the benefit of writing it
on their resume, rather than for any
personal importance.
An anonymous sophomore stu-
dent said some members of one of
the large pre-medical clubs at the
University join only so that they can
use it on their medical school appli-
cations.
"In a large organization like that,
there are so many members who don't
do anything," the student said. She
added that a lot of people in the club
join for the wrong reasons. "But I'm
sure there are some people who do join
for a good reason."

Rubn notes importance of internat/onal relatons,
believes country can overcome economic crisis

RUBIN
Continued from Page 1
important question is whether the recov-
ery will be sustained or short-lived after
the current stimulus measures have
worked through the economy.
Economic analysts overlook the risks
embodied in this question, he said.
In his discussion of solutions, Rubin
cited a lesson learned during the Mexi-
can and Asian financial crises that
occurred during the Clinton adminis-
tration.
"If we are going to succeed," he said,
"we must have genuine and mutual
respect (for other nations)."
Recognizing the importance of
exports, Rubin stressed the benefit

imports have on industries. Trade poli-
cies have highly visible impact, making
trade a tricky concern. Rubin also dis-
cussed the role other nations' economies
play in a U.S. economic recovery.
"What would help a lot is more robust
economies in Japan and Europe," he
said, though most economists foresee
only modest gains in those economies.
Speaking on the consequences of
the present economic state, Rubin said
the continuation of high trade imbal-
ances could have a profound effect on
the U.S. dollar. The U.S. economy
could be damaged by a severe weak-
ening of the dollar, as was experienced
at the end of the Carter administration,
if these trade imbalances are not recti-
fied, he said.

Addressing today's federal deficit,
Rubin mentioned the 1992 elections,
when a high federal deficit led the pub-
lic to believe that "we lost control of our
economic destiny" he said.
"Deficits reduce our flexibility in
responding to (events)," he said.
Because of the surpluses the coun-
try had on Sept. 11, the tragic event
could have been faced without
changes in the interest rate, he added.
Now, interest rates will remain low as
long as private capital demand
remains low.
"Fixing this morass has become
exceedingly difficult," he said.
Still, Rubin ended the lecture on
somewhat of a high note.
"The economic potential of our coun-

try is enormous," he said. "Our country
has been highly resilient in (hard
times)."
As Rubin fielded questions from the
audience at the end, he stressed that the
future of the economy is uncertain, say-
ing, "If I sounded unwarrantedly opti-
mistic, I certainly didn't mean to."
After joining Goldman, Sachs &
Company in 1966, Rubin became gen-
eral partner in 1971 and co-senior part-
ner and co-chairman from 1990 to
1992. He joined the Clinton adminis-
tration in 1993, directing the National
Economic Council. In 1995, Rubin was
sworn in as the 70th secretary of the
Treasury. Rubin became director and
chairman of the executive committee
for Citigroup in 1999.

GEO
Continued from Page 1
"They have to look at what they
think they have to do for the member-
ship versus what is still preserved in
that recommendation," he said.
Rackham student and genetics GSI

Allison Poor said she hadn't thought
much about the new policies, or
whether she would participate in a
work action.
"I would support it ... I don't
know if I would participate in it,"

ance benefits."
Eshleman said she would ensure
that any actions would have little
effect on her students, especially if
they are graduating in December.
"This is between the union and the
University," Eshleman said.
"I would do everything I could so

that their lack of my grade on their
official transcript wouldn't kill
them."
She added that a grade strike was
preferable to a walkout because
classes could still continue. "You
never undertake any type of work
action without serious unhappiness."

Poor said.
"I don't

even use the health insur-

COLEMAN
Continued from Page 1
pay package and other working conditions" at compet-
ing private schools, Toller said.
The compensation package offered to presidential
candidates must be large enough to attract experienced
leaders and to ensure that they do not soon leave for a
higher paying job, Toller said.
"What you're looking for is quality of leadership
and stability of leadership," he said.
Deitch said in addition to making their schools more
competitive, quality administrators return the money
invested in them by attracting more research grants.
The Board of Regents decided to increase the presi-
dent's salary even before administrators began to

search for a new president two years ago, University
spokeswoman Julie Peterson said.
The decision was based on the findings of a con-
sulting firm hired by the regents before President Lee
Bollinger left to take the top spot at Columbia Univer-
sity, Peterson said. The firm, Towers Perrin, reported
that Bollinger's salary of $326,550 was "quite a bit too
low," she said.
The regents decided to offer Coleman a yearly
salary of $475,000 after the firm suggested that the
new president be offered a salary in that range, Deitch
said. "If you wanted the best talent, then we had to be
very competitive"he said.
He said the figure did not increase the University's
budget - which is more than a billion dollars - and
was not responsible alone for significant tuition

increases.In addition to presidents being offered more
pay, more presidents like Coleman are receiving
incentives tied to their performance or to how long
they stay at their school, Toller said.
"There are a variety of incentives built in for the
person to stay, and that performance will be as effec-
tive as the board hoped for," Toller said.
In addition to her salary, the University is required
to pay Coleman $27,500 each year in benefits due to
retirement payment rules, Peterson said.
Coleman also receives $75,000 annually in
deferred compensation, so long as she stays at the
University for five years, Peterson said. After five
years, Coleman will also receive a retention bonus of
$500,000, bringing her average yearly income up to
$677,500.

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