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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, November 5, 2003 - 7

LANGUAGES
Continued from Page 1
main cause of disparities in understanding foreign
languages, others said the inequalities arise from
poor teaching methods.
LSA senior Oscar Rodriguez, whose proficien-
cy in Spanish placed him into an upper-level con-
versational program his freshman year, said
instructors' emphasis on grammar lessons con-
tributes to the gap between fluent speakers and
nonfluent speakers.
"The way (instructors) teach any LSA language
is, in the U.S., they teach more grammatical stuff,
so there's a deficiency in just plain fluency,' he said,
adding that his background in Spanish gave him an
edge even over accomplished speakers.
To a foreign language instructor, a rift between
fluent students and less experienced ones can frus-
trate the pace at which the class progresses through
the curriculum.
Sylvia Sutter, an assistant for student services in
the Department of Slavic Languages and Litera-
tures, said a glut of fluent students in lower-level
classes "would be difficult to other students,
because they would be left behind. ... We try to
have students at the same level."
To ensure that students in elementary language
courses learn at the same rate, Sutter added that stu-
dents have recourse to "heritage classes," which the
department has tailored specifically for students

who can speak - but cannot read or write - a
second language.
In addition to Russian, students can also take
heritage courses in other language programs such
as Spanish and Chinese.
But administrators said they cannot obligate stu-
dents already fluent in a second language to take
advanced courses or heritage classes. Instructors
can only ask students to transfer into more
advanced programs.
"It's all based on the instructor's decision peda-
gogically," Sutter said.
"I suggest to my student, 'you need to take a
higher class,' " said Wei Liu, a lecturer in second-
year Chinese.
Although administrators said they often
encounter proficient speakers in beginner cours-
es, they added that they do not believe these stu-
dents opt for elementary courses in order to
cinch a good grade.
"We don't get people trying to do that," said
Peggy McCracken, chair of the Department of
Romance Languages and Literatures. "It's really
hard to act bad in something you do well. ... It's too
much work, it's a four-hour-a-week class."
But students said they notice some of their class-
mates trying to cut corners by taking courses far
below their ken.
"There are a couple students who do that just to
get the easier grade," Mossa-Basha said. "But for
the most part, they're there to learn."

ART SCHOOL
Continued from Page 1
Schmidt said.
She said most professors approve of
the changes in the curriculum, though a
few were reluctant.
"It was a long, deliberate process with
full faculty involvement," Schmidt said
of the two-year discussion on changes.
"The faculty had a combined teach-
ing experience of about 500 years."
But there was no student input when
the changes were being made, Van Loan
said. Students were told about the
changes during summer orientation,
after they had already committed to the
School of Art & Design.
"They told us we were guinea pigs
and they were going to see what
went wrong in the first semester,"
Van Loan said. "First semester, we
had way too many balls in the air
and we were all upset. They made
changes second semester that did
make it a little better."
Schmidt said in the first year of a cur-
riculum change, some students are dis-
appointed because they do not receive
information about the changes -
though most students have been delight-

ed by the changes, she added.
"There's definitely a renewed sense
of energy at the school," she added.
May said the curriculum change has
created mixed feelings in students.
"In a way, it is more energetic in the
school," he said. "The basis of the cur-
riculum is to get people to try different
arts like design drawing and figure
drawing."
"Most freshmen and sophomores I've
talked to - half had their heart set on a
specific art while others liked trying
new things they probably wouldn't have
tried," he added. "There are mixed
reviews -half like it and half don't."
Most juniors and seniors are working
around the changes, May said. Though
he heard a lot of complaints last year, he
hasn't heard many this year.
Now in the RC, Van Loan still plans
to take courses at the School of Art and
Design. "I like the RC a lot better
because I have the freedom to choose
my classes," she said. "I am a little dis-
appointed, because I wanted to go to art
school but this one just didn't suit me."
Other University colleges that have
recently undertaken redesigns include
the School of Dentistry, the Medical
School and the Business School.

PARKING
Continued from Page 1
budget constraints, Brown said, adding that the AVI system
would actually prove to be more cost effective than the current
system. "This new advanced system (AVI) should save some
expenses instead of keeping actual staff. Additionally, the new
system can alert drivers when the structure is full," she said.
Similar systems are already in place on major high-speed
toll roads and highways and have proved to be beneficial,
Brown said. Faculty and staff will need to make a $20 deposit
to secure one of the new devices.
The devices mount to a vehicle's dashboard and can be
switched between automobiles. Instead of the driver physically
scanning the pass, the new system simply scans itself as the
driver enters the lot.
The University also touts the enhanced security under the
new system. Although the previous passes could be deactivat-
ed upon loss or theft, the new AVI devices will prevent people
from reselling the stolen permit, according to Brown. Any lost
or stolen device will be replaced for an additional $20 fee.
But a slight complication may occur with owners of select
vehicles. The AVI device may not work with owners of
BMWs, Subarus and various General Motors sport utility
vehicles, according to the University's Parking and Transporta-
tion website.
Brown said that any specific complications an employee
has with their AVI device would be addressed on a case-by-
case basis. The list of Blue parking structures to be converted
and the schedule can be found on the Parking and Transporta-
tion website, www.parking.umich.edu.

A2 voters appo anti_
urban sprawipro posal

GREENBELTPropos
blity re,
Continued from Page 1 mayoral
increased voter turnout. The election officers
drew three to four times the normal Electe
turnout in an off-year. register
Opponents of the Greenbelt pro- election
posal said that it could increase hous- required
ing and rental costs, which might one year
negatively affect students. LSAf
But opponents said they were not from th
discouraged by the proposal's suc- on Prop
cess. here sh
We understood going in that it to seew
was going to be a tough campaign," going th
said Craig Welch, chair of Washtenaw Anot
Citizens for Responsible Growth. Levine,
"We were happy for the opportunity think it
to campaign and we look forward to want to
working with the mayor," he added. cially si
The other proposal on the ballot, eight m
the michigan daily

l A, would have relaxed eligi-
estrictions for City Council or
l candidates and for appointed
>.
ed officials are required to be
red as voters at the time of
n. Council members are also
d to be residents in their wards
r prior to the election.
freshman David Zhen, who is
e 1st Ward, said he voted no
posal A. "I believe officials
ould have lived in Ann Arbor
what kinds of problems it is
rough," he said.
her LSA freshman, Emma
voted yes on the proposal. "I
is beneficial for students who
run for City Council, espe-
nce they move around every
onths," she said.

CITY COUNCIL
Continued from Page 1
Haug won 15 percent.
Johnson advocates regional urban
planning and said he wants to mediate
issues between students and police.
"I want to facilitate interaction
between student groups and the (Ann
Arbor) Police Department," he said.
Lax, an arts writer for The Michigan
Daily on leave, said his campaign was a
great learning experience.
"Maybe someday down the road
you'll see my name on a ballot, but for
now, I'm going to focus on being a stu-
dent;' Lax said. He ran in the election as
an independent.
Haug, a member of the Green Party,
said he plans to stay involved in commu-
nity politics. "The main goal of this
campaign was not to win but to get the
issues out in the open and have the other
candidates discuss them,"he said.

Both Haug and Lax said they will
continue to reside in Ann Arbor.
Higgins was victorious over LSA sen-
ior Dan Sheill, alum Scott Trudeau and
independent Jon Kinsey in the 4th Ward.
Higgins had 52 percent of the vote, beat-
ing Sheill's 6 percent, Trudeau's 30 per-
cent and Kinsey's 12 percent.
Like other candidates who did not
win a City Council position, Trudeau
thanked voters and volunteers who sup-
ported him.
"I encourage students to vote not only
in presidential or gubernatorial elections
but also in local elections," said
Trudeau, a member of the Green Party.
Sheill, a Libertarian, and Higgins
could not be reached for comment.
In the 2nd Ward, Reid won against
Democrat Amy Seetoo, 54 to 46 per-
cent. Reid was unavailable for comment.
With 73 percent of the vote, Greden
triumphed in the 3rd Ward over Liber-
tarian Rich Birkett, with 14 percent, and

"I want to encourage (students) to get more
involved, whether they register to vote m
Ann Arbor, come to speak at City Council
meetings or call me directly at my office.
- City Councilman-elect Leigh Greden
(D-5th Ward)

independent Donna Rose, with 12 per-
cent.
Greden said he hoped students would
take an interest in city affairs.
"I want to encourage them to get
more involved, whether they register to
vote in Ann Arbor, come to speak at
City Council meetings or call me direct-
ly at my office," Greden said.
In ward five, Woods easily kept her
seat, defeating Libertarian Jason Kantz
75 percent to 11 percent. Fourteen per-
cent of the voters chose a write-in candi-
date, Adrianna Buonarropi, the 2002

Green Party nominee for lieutenant gov-
ernor.
Woods' campaign used many differ-
ent means to inform and contact the
public, including going door to door to
speak to voters and mailing out flyers
and other information to the people in
her ward. "We set up a website so peo-
ple could go and see my positions on
various issues, my accomplishments,
and my qualifications," she said.
Woods added that her campaigning
allowed her to establish a "comfortable
lead" early last night.

FALL 2004 HUGE 9 BDRM. HOUSE on
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idry. 665-8825.
FALL 2004 RENT with us! We have it all!
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bdm. prkg. avail. 734-260-3619/260-3473.
FOOD, FUN, FRIENDS, FACILITIES!
Student Co-op Housing. Rooms available
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laundry, parking, meals, social activities!
$430-620. Contact ICC Office at 662-4414
or www.icc.coop
GREAT HOUSE AVAIL. Sept. '04 near ath-
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GREAT REMODELED 2 bdrm. Kerrytown.
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new! Call for special. 973-7368.
HOUSE 6 BDRMS. 3 baths. totally reno-
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close to campus and nursing. 347-6372.
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY
Campus Area Apartments
Wilson White Company, Inc.
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www.wilsonwhitecompany.com
Equal Housing Opportunity
IN A LEAGUE OF IT'S OWN - 1 block to
Campus. The Washington Manor - 418 E.
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apts. Modern bldg. with new kitchens, A/C,
furn., balconies, great for Graduate students.
Fall- Call Varsity for appt 668-1100.
KERRYTOWN 6/7 BDRM. HSE. FALL
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Call for viewing 668-1100.
MCKINLEY STREET SPACIOUS 1 & 2
bdrm. apts. Bay Windows, fireplace, balc.,
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NEAR UNION, LG. contemporary studios, 1
bdrms. & 2 bdrms. Fall & May leases avail.
741-9300. www annarborapartments net
NOW LEASING FOR FALL 2004
CAMPUS RENTALS
HOUSES AND APARTMENTS
STOPBY FORABROCHURE
1335 S. UNIVERSITY
665-8825
WWW.CAMPUSREALTY.COM
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RENT MEI'MAGREATHOUSE! GREAT LOCATION. ABBEY APT. MAKE$$$TAKINGOnline Surveys THE ORIGINAL COTTAGE INN is looking LOOKING FOR TWO premium tickets for
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418 E.Kingsley B 7
1522Geddes 7
926 Sylvan 7
909 Sylan 8
927 S. State 6
933 S. State 7
1303 S. State 6
817 McKinley 7
1012 Michigan 6
1601 S. University 6
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JANUARY 1ST SUBLET. 820+ sq. ft. apt.
Corner Packard/State. Off Street prkg. $750
includes everything. Jason @ 734-997-0254.

M=May S=Sept. J=Jacuzzi
All have been completely remodeled. Oak
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have central A/C, rest have room A/C.
Call 973-7368, www.allmandproperties.com
RENTS FROM $699 for a very limited time!
Pets welcome, covered prkg., 24-hr. fitness
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888-729-4809 or visit
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RIVER'S EDGE APARTMENTS! Why pay
the high A2 prices? Ypsilanti is only 15 min.
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bdrms. From $595. Free Heat & Water.
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TOWNHOME. BEAUTIFULLY REMOD-
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UNIVERSITYTOWERS
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NOW TAKING RESERVATIONS
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Call Today 734-761-2680
W. HURON 2 bdrm. duplex, 900 sq. ft. Off
street prkg. wshr./dryer incl. private deck,
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COLLEGE CLEANERS: PROF Dry Clean-
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University. Next to Hill Aud. 662-1906.
HAIRBRAIDING- FREE Transportation!
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PRIVATE TUTORING FOR LSAT,
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734.996.2861 www.TESTGURU.com
THESIS EDITING. 25 yrs. U-M exp.
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TUTORS! MAYSSOUN BYDON, U of M
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Best preparation course in town. Call the Institute
for Higher Learning. 734-213-5728.

MICHIGAN TELEFUND NOW HIRING
students for flexible night and weekend schedules.
Earn great money and make new friends
while supporting your University. Awesome
Resume Builder! Work Study / Non-Work
Study. Apply online: www.telefund.umich.edu.
998-7420.
MOVIE EXTRAS/MODELS NEEDED
for local casting calls. No exp. or age re-
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Earn up to $200 a day.
1-888-820-0167
NANNY/HOUSEKEEPER-- Mon.- Fri. 2-6
pm. Westside Ann Arbor. Afterschool care
for 3 kids, aged 11-14. Includes driving chil-
dren to activities, light housekeeping, laun-
dry, meal preparation, errands. Must have re-
liable transportation, work well with minimal
supervision, and have references. Avail. im-
mediately. Option of full-time during sum-
mer months. $10/hour. Respond to
kfpannarb@aol.com (or 734-395-2882) and
include contact information and resume/de-
scription of experience.
PAID EXPERIMENT $20. Fun group com-
puter game, 3 hours eves. Central Campus. Go
to Experiments.org to sign up.
PHARMACOGENETICS AND
EYE PRESSURE CONTROL
The U-M Kellogg Eye Center is currently
conducting research to understand how eye
pressure is controlled by specific genes. You
can participate if you: are between 18 and 50
years of age; are not pregnant; have no his-
tory of severe asthma, eye surgery or eye
trauma. Upon completion of the study, partic-
ipants will be compensated. This study in-
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more information, please contact the U-M
Kellogg Eye Center at 888-393-4677(EYE-
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PHYSICAL ASST. NEEDED for disabled
male law student. Pay neg., well trained, call
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PROMOTIONAL MODELS- promote new
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Eam $20-25/hr. Must be 21+. 734-717-4727.
RESEARCH SUBJECTS WANTED
What causes heartburn?
We want to know, and you can help.
Investigators at the University of Michigan
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are looking for people with heartburn.
Receive $150 for as little as a few hours of in-
volvement over two days.
For more information, contact
Either: Dr. Borko Nojkov
(734) 615-3990 bnojkov@umich.edu
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(734) 936-8750 bweinman@umich.edu
SCOREKEEPERS IS NOW HIRING Cooks,
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!BABYSITTER NEEDED! for 8 mo. old,
20hrs/wk., flexible hrs. 327-4665.
FUN JOB WORKING with young children.
Substitutes needed work according to your
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ers welcome to apply too. Call St. Paul Early
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PARENT'S HELPER WANTED: For very
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or Thurs. 4-6. References required. Must be
flexible and like kids. 996-3437.
WANTED: RESPONSIBLE, TRUSTWOR-
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NATIONAL SPEAKER GARY YOUROFSKY
at UM today November 5th
7pm in the Michigan Union (Pendleton Rm.)
Incredible presentation and video footage
about pressing societal issues!

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GREAT LOCAL COUPLE eager to
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If interested please call 734-213-1225

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