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November 03, 2003 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday - November 3, 2002 - 3B

SATURDAY'S GAME
Niagara 2
Michigan 6
SATURDAY'S GAME
Michigan 6, Niagara 2

Michi 'an scores first four It's 'the remix to Braylition,'

-in Ni whoop-g hot &fesho

Niagara
Michigan

0 2 0 -2
2 2 2 -6

First period - 1, MICH, David Moss 2 (Jeff Tam-
bellini, Brandon Rogers) 11:39 (pp); 2, MICH David
Rohfs 3 (Eric Werner, Michael Woodford) 12:23.
Penalties - Aaron Clarke, NU (high sticking) 0:48;
Bench, MICH (too many men) 7:26; Clarke, NU (trip-
ping) 10:59; Luke Pario ,NU (slashing) 12:59; Dave
Homunik, NU (roughing) 17:40.
Second period - 3, MICH, Tambellini 6 (Eric Nysty-
rom, Jason Dest) 0:35; 4, MICH, Mike Brown
(Andrew Ebbett, Brandon Kaleniecki) 6:58; 5, NU,
Andrew Nahiriak 1 (unassisted) 16:10; 6, NU, Chris
Welch 1 (Homunik, Barret Ehgoetz) 19:14. Penalties
- Matt Hunwick, MICH (roughing) 2:58; Joe Tallari,
NU (roughing) 2:58; Moss, MICH (cross-checking)
7:15; Kaleniecki, MICH (roughing) 12:41; Tallari, NU
(slashing) 17:12.
Third period - 7, MICH, Ebbett 4 (Kaleniecki, Milan
Gajic) 9:45 (pp); 8, MICH, Henderson 2 (unassist-
ed). Penalties - Tambellini, MICH (tripping) 5:00;
Andy Burnes, MICH (roughing) 5:19; Tallari, NU
(roughing) 5:19; Jordan Meloff, NU (hooking) 8:55;
Clarke, NU (10-minute misconduct) 10:29; Clarke,
NU (high sticking) 10:29; Sean Bentivoglio, NU
(roughing) 10:29; Tim Cook, MICH (roughing)
10:29.
Shots on goal: NU 3-10-9 22; MICH 9-16-13 38. Power
plays: NU 0Oof 4; MICH 2 of 7.
Saves - NU, VanNyatten 1-1-0 - 32; MICH, Mon-
toya 7-1-0 - 17, Ruden 0-0-0 - 3.
At: Yost Ice Arena. Attendance: 6,643.
'M' STATS

Player
Tambellini
Ebbett
Hensick
Kaleniecki
Moss
Werner
Rogers
Nystrom
Rohlfs
Gajic
Henderson
Hunwick
Woodford
Helminen
Dest
Brown
Cook
Kautz
Burnes
Martens
Ryznar
Wyzgowski
TOTALS

GP
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
6
8
7
6
7
8
6
3
7
4
1
1

G
6
4
2
4
2
2
0
3
3
1
2
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
31

A
3
5
6
2
4
4
5
1
1
3
1
3
3
1
2
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
46

Pts
9
9
8
6
6
6
5
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
2
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
77

+/-
E
4
1
5
-2
-2
E
-3
E
E
2
-1
-1
-4
E
-2
6
2
1
E
1
E
6

PIM Sht
8 53
4 17
2 23
8 28
4 15
6 20
22 22
4 17
6 17
6 23
2 12
12 11
6 12
0 14
7 4
2 21
12 6
2 3
2 3
4 5
0 2
0 0
127 328

By Gennaro Filice
Daily Sports Writer
Saturday at noon, all eyes in Michigan
turned to East Lansing. Throughout the
afternoon, every Wolverine heart collec-
tively beat to the events that took place in
Spartan Stadium. And this concerned
Michigan hockey coach Red Berenson.
"I was a little worried about the foot-
ball game today because we can all get
kind of thinking about that, and then
maybe not be as ready," Berenson said
following Saturday night's game at Yost
Ice Arena.
But Berenson's worries proved
insignificant, as Michigan - a team
that's struggled a bit with sluggish first
period play - overcame pigskin distrac-
tions and a thinned weekend game slate
to jump out to an early 4-0 lead over
Niagara en route to a 6-2 victory.
"Our team was anxious to play,"
Berenson said. "It was a long week, and
we only had one game to play this
weekend."
"I think the whole dressing room had
a pretty good feel from the get-go,"
sophomore Jeff Tambellini said.
The Wolverines managed nine shots
on goal (to Niagara's three) in a defen-
sive first period. Making the most of
its opportunities, Michigan manufac-
tured two goals. The Wolverines (3-1
CCHA, 7-1 overall) drew first blood,
notching a powerplay goal in the 12th
minute of the game.
After Michigan cycled the puck
around the perimeter a few times, Nia-
gara's (1-0 CHA, 2-3) penalty kill fell a
step behind. Junior Brandon Rogers
found Tambellini open just outside the
right faceoff circle, and Tambellini
ripped a one-timer at Purple Eagle goalie
Jeff VanNynatten. The shot reached Van-
Nynatten untouched and bounced off of
his chest. Junior David Moss then poked
the loose puck through the five-hole for
his second goal of the season.
This was the first of two Michigan
goals produced in their seven power-
play opportunities. The Wolverines
have scored at least one powerplay
goal in each game of the season. But,
Berenson believes there's still plenty of
room for improvement.
"(On the powerplay) I thought we
were really good at times, and then not
so good at times," Berenson said. "They
did a good job of blocking shots."
Less than a minute later, freshman
David Rohlfs interrupted the student
section's first goal celebration with
another Wolverine score. Junior Eric
Werner - who has proven Michigan's
most offensive defensemen - received
a pass on the right side of the goal from
junior Michael Woodford. Werner wait-

JEFF LEHNERT/Daily
Freshman Mike Brown notched his first career score in Saturday's 6-2 shellacking

Player GP GA Avg Ss Pct Mins
Montoya 8 20 2.62 180 .900 458:10
Ruden 2 2 5.50 7 .778 21:50
TOTALS 8 22 2.75 187 .865 480:00
CCHA ROUNDUP
Thuisday's game:
NOTRE DAME 4, Nebraska-Omaha 2
Fiday's games:
NOTRE DAME 2, Nebraska-Omaha 0
BOWLING GREEN 4, MIAMI 1
MICHIGAN STATE 8, Ferris State 0
OHIO STATE 2, Alaska Fairbanks 2
Western Michigan 5, CORNELL 5
LAKE SUPERIOR 2, St. Lawrence 2
Satrdays games:
BOWUNG GREEN 4, Miami 4
MICHIGAN STATE 4, Ferris State 2
OHIo STATE 4, Alaska Fairbanks 2
MCuN 6, Niaga 2
Western Michigan 3, CORNELL 2
LAKE SUPERIOR 4, St. Lawrence 2
CCHA STANDINGS

of Niagara.
ed for VanNynatten to commit and then
dished the puck across the goal to
Rohlfs who finished easily on a wide-
open net.
"(Michigan) comes at you in waves,"
Niagara coach Dave Burkholder said.
"They attack you with three across and
then their 'D' jumps in as well, and we
couldn't stop them tonight."
Michigan opened up the second peri-
od with a flair. Tambellini received the
puck on a breakaway from junior Eric
Nystrom and rocketed a wrister at the
goal. VanNynatten deflected the shot,
but Tambellini slapped the loose puck
into the net just 35 seconds into the
period.
Six minutes later, sophomore Andrew
Ebbett skated up the left boards and
sent a long cross-ice pass to freshman
Mike Brown, who buried his first
Michigan goal.
Down 4-0, Niagara got on the board
with 3:50 left in the second period.
Andrew Nahirniak scooped up a loose
puck on the right side of the goal and
sent a heavy wrister toward Michigan
goalie Al Montoya. A pileup ensued
around the goal, and the puck ended up
in the net. Nahirniak was credited with
the goal, but Berenson thought one of
his players had accidentally knocked it
through the pipes. Chris Welch cut

Michigan's lead to 4-2 with only 46 sec-
onds left in the second period. On a
breakaway, Welch started on the right
side of the goal, deked around an out-
stretched Montoya and flipped the puck
into the left side of the goal.
"We were probably fortunate that it
was the end of the period because we
were on our heels, and they had the
momentum," Berenson said. "We'd
given them, I thought, a couple of
weird goals - one of our players put
their first goal in, and then their sec-
ond goal, a guy came out of the penal-
ty box, and we made a poor decision to
forget the man and go after the puck
and missed it."
But Niagara's drive died at the inter-
mission as the Wolverines iced the
game with a pair of goals in the first
seven minutes of third period. Ebbett
beat VanNynatten with a putback on the
powerplay, and junior Charlie Hender-
son jumped on a loose puck and sent a
quick wrister to the back of the net.
"You've got to give credit to Niagara
for the game they put up," Berenson
said. "They had us on our heels at times
in the second period and early in the
third.
"We didn't feel safe with a two-goal
lead against that team, so I think it
shows a lot of respect for them."

j J. BRADY MCCOLLOUGH
The SportsMonday Column
AST LANSING - Now, usually
Idon't do this, but uh ... give
'em a lil' preview of the remix.
No, forget the preview. This is the
remix - "the remix to Braylition."
Braylon Edwards, I called you out.
After the Indiana game, in which you
stood on the sidelines for the first quar-
ter and a half, I questioned your work
ethic. I said you had created the image
of a superstar, but weren't giving the
effort to back up that image. I gven
compared you to R. Kelly.
I don't regret what I did. When I
heard you told other media members
the Monday after the Minnesota game
that I had misrepresented you, I didn't
flinch. You, the coaches and even your
father, Stan, gave me the impression
you were struggling with the responsi-
bilities bestowed upon the bearer of the
No. 1 jersey. My column was valid.
But this is the remix.
Bounce, bounce, bounce, bounce,
bounce, bounce, bounce - off my
hands.
Before you had even gone to bed Fri-
day night, The Michigan Daily had
already won the first game of the week-
end doubleheader, 10-6 over The State
News (that's 10 touchdowns to six
touchdowns).
I played tight end for most of the
night. Before the game, I wore the No.
1 jersey. I wanted the pressure, too.
For the past three weeks building up to
the State News game, I had been hyp-
ing myself as having the best hands on
the team. Just put it on my hands, I'll
catch it.
Until it counts.
I ran a pristine out-and-up - a pat-
tern I think you should run more often
- and left my guy in the dust. Quarter-
back Matt Venegoni put it over my
right shoulder in the endzone. I
watched it all the way in.
Drop.
Two series later, the same thing hap-
pened. Same route, same great touch
on the throw.
Drop.
My team needed me to catch those
balls, and for some reason, I can't
explain why I couldn't make the big
play. Obviously, I'm a sports writer for
a reason. I'm not you.
But I can feel you.
Dropping passes is something you
really can't explain. It does just happen.
And when it does, it eats and nags at
you afterward. Just ask my teammates
about the personal pity party I was
holding on the sidelines. Being No. 1
isn't easy, but the past five weeks,
you've made it look that way.
A r4

it the kitchen
The way you do the things you do
remind me of my Lexus coup.
Actually Braylon, I'd say you're run-
ning more like a Ferrari Testarossa.
You've scored seven touchdowns in
five games, six of those scores coming
in three games against then-top-10
opponents Iowa, Purdue and Michigan
State. Enough said.
You're second in the nation in touch-
down receptions with 11, tied with
Oklahoma State's Rashaun Woods and
five behind Pittsburgh's Larry Fitzger-
ald. Woods and Fitzgerald don't have to
share the rock with guys like Jason
Avant and Steve Breaston on a regular
basis, which makes it a lot easier for
them to inflate their stats.
But regardless of your talented
fellow receivers, John Navarre looks
for you when the team needs six.
You're the key to your team's igni-
tion in the air.
You must be a football coach, the
way you got me playin'the field.
You didn't exactly "toot, toot" or
"beep, beep," but whatever you did to
fix things up with Lloyd Carr and the
other coaches, it must have worked.
You're playing the number of snaps
you should have been playing all
along, and look what it's done for the
team.
Chris Perry is leading the nation in
rushing, Navarre has been steady as
always, but without your acrobatic,
high-wire acts in the endzone, I don't
think you guys would have won the last
four games.
When I heard that I missed your out-
pouring at the press conference after
the Minnesota game, where you
claimed you were a good guy and that
you would return for your senior sea-
son, I was shocked. It's rare that a play-
er in this program steps up and takes a
stand with the media. You guys aren't
allowed to. Did you ask Carr to let you
stand up for yourself, or did he ask
you? Either way, I respect that.
Prophecy is on the door
What does the future hold for you?
Big things, if the remix of your season
and football career continues. You
could be a top-10 pick in the 2005 NFL
Draft with your combination of raw
speed, ups and soft hands.
What's the prophecy for your team-
mates? Your current group could
become the first since 1997 to make
the Rose Bowl if you guys can find a
way to stay focused for three more
weeks. But you already know that.
You've been playing like it's the only
thing on your mind.
Here's another thing I'm sure you
already know: If you don't perform
like the Ferrari you can be, you guys
probably won't be booking tickets to
Pasadena.
Don't worry, though. I know you can
handle the pressure now.
J. Brady McCollough and R. Kelly did not
collaborate on this column. McCollough
can be reached at bradymcc@umich.edu.

Six players score in Blue rout

Team
Ohio State
Michigan State
Notre Dame
Miami
Michigan
Bowling Green
Western Michigan
Alaska Fairbanks
Northern Michigan
Ferris State
Nebraska-Omaha
Lake Superior

W
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
2
2
1
0
0

L
1
2
2
2
1
3
3
2
2
5
3
2

Pts
10
8
8
7
6
5
5
4
4
2
1
0

Overall
W L T
6 3 0
5 3 0
5 2 0
3 5 2
7 1 0
2 4 2
3 3 2
3 5 0
3 3 0
2 6 0
0 5 1
2 2 2

By Brian Schick
Daily Sports Writer

So far this season, Michigan has won
most of its contests with one player
shouldering the offensive load each

game. But on Satur-
day, the Wolverines
notched six goals,
and six different
players scored them.
The explosion
was the most well-

_ BO g

eight of the next 10 games against con-
ference foes, including matchups
against Ohio State and Michigan State.
"I thought it was good for us to get
some nonconference games out of the
way," sophomore forward Jeff Tambelli-
ni said. "It's a good time of the year
when you get deep into the conference
games and the teams you'll face in the
playoffs. I think our team is fine and
ready to go."
SWING AND A Miss: Sophomore for-
ward Andrew Ebbett threw up his hands
in excitement after scoring a powerplay
goal near the end of the first period,
making the score to 3-0. Just as the
Mumford High School band (replacing
the Michigan hockey pep band this

weekend) began to play "The Victors,"
referee Steve Piotrowski waved off the
goal, indicating Ebbett's stick was
above the crossbar of the goal.
Working in front of the net on the
powerplay, Ebbett swatted the puck into
the net after a deflected pass from jun-
ior defenseman Brandon Rogers. Both
the band and Ebbett - as well as the
6,643 fans at Yost - thought the goal
was good, despite the high stick.
"I was kind of hoping it was a goal,"
Ebbett said. "(Kaleniecki), my linemate,
was right there, and he said that (my
stick) was a little high, so I trust him.
"I was kind of getting on the ref there
a little bit, trying to get him to rethink it,
but I guess it was the right call."

ltter month hatus,
Ryznar returns to M'

.i1 1 "

HOW THEY FARED
No.1 Maine (7-0-0) vs. Boston University
W 2-1, vs. Merrimack W 6-2.
No. 2 North Dakota (4-1-0) vs. Yale W 10-
0, W 8-4.
No. 3 New Hampshire (4.1-0) vs. Union 9-2.
No. 4 Michigan (7-1-0) vs. Niagra 6-2.
No. 5 Boston College (3-2-1) did not play.
No. 6 Denver (5-1-0) at Minnesota W 4-3,
L 2-6.
No. 7 Boston UnIversity (214) at Maine L 1-2.
No. 8 Colorodo Coliege (5-0-1) vs. Min-
nesota State W 3-1, W 3-0.
No. 9 Harvard (0-1-0) Brown L 0-2.
No. 10 Minnesota (1-3-0) vs. Denver L 3-
4, W 6-2.
No. 11 Cornell (0-1-1) vs. Western Michi-
gan T 5-5, L 2-3.
No.12 Minnesota-Duluth (4-2-1) vs. Alas-
ka-Anchorage W 5-1, W 8-1.
No. 13 St. Cloud State (5-0-1) vs. Prince-
ton W 3-1, W 2-1.
No. 14 Massachusetts (5-1-0) at Provi-
dence W 4-2, vs. Providence L 2-6.
No. 15 Providence (5-2-1) vs. Providence
L 2-4, at Providence W 6-2.

rounded output of the season, and the
first game in a month that didn't feature
a multiple goal-scorer. In addition, all
four lines notched a goal, a demonstra-
tion of the Michigan's depth.
Coach Red Berenson feels that his
team is capable of having every player
step up and carry the load offensively.
"When we're playing our best, we
should have everyone at least have some
kind of chance to score, and we should
also be playing well at our end of the
zone" Berenson said. "As a coach, that's
the challenge, to get everyone playing
well with and without the puck."
But Berenson is always quick to state
that a player shouldn't be judged by his
statistics alone and the subtle aspects of
his game are equally important.
"We need everyone to be able to con-
tribute if they get a chance, and certain-
ly offensively the puck isn't always
going to go in for your top goal-scor-
ers;" Berenson said. "(On Saturday) you
saw a lot of different guys contribute
offensively, and that is good."
Michigan's forwards seem to be hit-
ting their stride at the right time, as
Michigan begins a long string of con-
ference games. After having a month of
alternating between CCHA and non-
conference games, the schedule has

By Sharad Mattu
Daily Sports Writer
It was inevitable. Jason Ryznar was
back in the lineup last night, and it was
only a matter of time before he and his
recovered right shoulder would be test-
ed on the ice.
When it finally happened, the
Wolverines' coaches and players collec-
tively held their breath and waited to see
if Ryznar had survived unscathed.
Up in the pressbox, goaltending
coach Stan Matijiw gasped and pound-
ed his fist, watching closely as Ryznar
made his way to the bench.
Late in the third period of Michigan's
6-2 win over Niagara, Ryznar fully
extended his right arm out for the puck
at center-ice and a Purple Eagle skated
straight into it.
When it comes to Ryznar, it's under-
standable to fear the worst.
Last year, he injured his right shoul-
der the first game of the year against
Niagara, and then in his first game back
injured his left shoulder. He missed nine
games last year due to injury.
This season, Ryznar injured his right
shoulder against York Oct. 3. The plan
had been for him to return for last
weekend's series against Western
Michigan, but he opted to wait an extra
week. And Saturday, the possibility of a
separation or dislocation lingered as he

skated off the ice.
It turned out to be nothing more than
a scare, but it gave the Wolverines a
fright that rivaled anything they may
have witnessed on Halloween.
"It woke me up for a bit, but I got out
of it safely so I'm happy about it," the
junior forward said.
If healthy, Ryznar's size can give fits
to opponents. Michigan's offense has
been potent lately, but it is a relatively
small unit. Ryznar, at 6-foot-4 and 205
pounds, can fill an important role.
"Ryz is a big part of our physical
offense," sophomore forward Jeff Tam-
bellini said. "To have him back doing
the things he does down low, cycling the
puck, is great."
But first Ryznar needs to get com-
fortable on the ice again, something that
will take more than one game.
"It was great to get out there with the
guys and bang in the corners a little bit,"
Ryznar said.
"To tell you the truth, I felt kind of
out of sync out there. It's going to take a
few games to get back into it."
With key CCHA games against Ferris
State and Ohio State the next two weeks,
this is a good time for Ryznar's return,
as Michigan coach Red Berenson can
now send his best lineup out on the ice.
"It was a good test for Ryz because
he hasn't played at all since (the game
against York)," Berenson said.

JEFF LEHNERT/Daily
Sophomore Andrew Ebbett had a goal and an assist for the Wolverines. Ebbett put
a second puck into the net, but it was called back for high-sticking.

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