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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 22, 2003 - 7

REJECTION
Continued from Page 1
according to the report.
Identifying the neurology of
rejection provides insight into more
severe conditions of depression and
suicide. The results indicate that
extreme situations resulting from
peer rejection, like school shoot-
ings, now have some biological
basis, the researchers said in a writ-
ten statement.
Ostracism and rejection deprive
people of a sense of belonging and
control, self-esteem and a "mean-
ingful existence," the study found.
At the University, psychology
researchers have investigated a
number of factors that affect
responses to social rejection.
Studies show that personality
traits can offset or exacerbate social
anxiety.
Rackham student Christian
Waugh, who conducts research in
psychology, said self-esteem is inte-
gral when studying mental health.
People with high self-esteem who
rely less on relationships tend to
weather rejection better.
"The findings are that people
who are more highly connected, and
have better/more enjoyable relation-
ships report better mental and phys-
ical health," Waugh said.
Psychology Prof. Susan Nolen-
Hoeksema confirmed that stable
relationships are essential to emo-
tional well-being.
On campus, there are a number of
resources available for students who
feel the pangs of rejection and emo-
P tional stress.
The University's Counseling and
Psychological Services is the cen-
tral support service on campus.
Though the office's number of
cases has increased this year, it con-
tinues to work with faculty and staff
to make sure students know of its
services.
"We do hear that students don't
know that we are here. We're con-
sistently trying to get the word out
that we exist," said Todd Sevig,
director of CAPS.
Often inundated with materials
during orientation, students tend to

Helping
Dealing
with
rejection
Places to go:
Counseling and Psychological
Services (CAPS)
Third floor of the Michigan Union
(734)764-8312
University Psychological Clinic
East Hall
(734)764-3471
University Center for the Child
and the Family (UCCF)
East Hall
(734)764-9466
forget about the University's offer-
ings, Sevig said. With a staff of pro-
fessional psychologists and social
workers providing both individual
and group counseling, CAPS is one
of the University's main resources
for mental help.
But Sevig mentioned that other
resources are available, such the
campus' psychological clinic and
the University Center for the Child
and Family.
In residence halls, resident advi-
sors are trained "to listen, be com-
passionate and caring, and to know
the right resources," said Jeanine
Bessette, assistant director of resi-
dence education for University
Housing.
"But (residence advisors) are not
trained to be counselors. They not
trained to be the primary (source)
of support," Bessette added.
LSA junior Andre Porchia, an RA
in Couzens Residence Hall, recount-
ed what he did when students came
to him with emotional problems.
"I talked them through it. If I
could tell that they really needed
some help, I referred them to some-
one who was more experienced. I
was trained to do that," Porchia
said. "I let them know that there are
people out there."

ISLAM
Continued from Page 1.
becoming Muslim and the diverse experiences that bring
people to Islam.
"Ultimately all we can do is present Islam as we've
experienced it and understand it," he said. "What other
people do with it will be different according to who they
are and what they want. I'm looking at it more from our
angle, that we have a responsibility to express ourselves."
Law School student Felix Chang said he attended the
event out of curiosity and was very impressed with the
testimonies he heard.
"I think they were really honest and open about the
decisions they had to make, something very personal to
them that they shared, and I appreciated that," he said. "I
think their stories are really interfaith, that their stories
of conversion can pretty much be applied to any belief
system, so it has universal appeal."
Muslim Students Association President Omar Khalil
said the panel drew positive response last year, and that
people commented that they enjoyed seeing how pan-
elists were introduced to Islam and what aspects of
Islam affected them the most.
"We had a lot of feedback last year saying perhaps
that was people's favorite event of the week, so we felt it
was something we should continue," said Khalil, a Rack-
ham student.
He said the event also showcases the diversity within
Islam and gives campus and community members a more
familiar angle from which to approach understanding Islam.
"First of all, what we wanted to show is that Islam
isn't just a foreign religion (and that Muslims are) not
just from the Middle East or Pakistan or from Indone-
sia," he said. "We wanted to show that there are people
like the students on this campus who are born American,
raised American, and yet they felt this for them was the
religion they chose for themselves."
Dann remembers being 14 years old and having a
short discussion about Islam with his coach, but it was
not until later that he said he realized the impact the
discussion had on him and the process he had
embarked upon.
"I didn't realize it at the time, but suddenly it had an
attraction to me. When I met a Muslim I would ask him
what he believed and if he had anything I could read.
The seed was already there," he said.
His conversion was a gradual process, Dann said, but
it didn't entirely negate his previous beliefs.
"Becoming a Muslim to me wasn't disbelieving in
Jesus or leaving everything from Christianity behind. It
was about believing in what I considered to be a more
accurate version of God's message."
He added that Islam has changed his life and his inter-
actions with his family for the better.
"Without Islam I don't know where I would be today.
My motivation for succeeding academically and suc-
ceeding professionally - all that stems from Islam, and
I don't think it'd be there if it weren't for Islam."

DAVID TUMAN/Dally
Students taking freshman-year classes may notice a lower percentage of blacks and Hispanics In the
classroom, according to the 2003 enrollment data released yesterday.

EN ROLLM ENT
Continued from Page 1
20 points to every underrepresented minority. The
University revamped its application process in
August to allow for more creative ways to find out
about a candidate's past and experiences. The
admissions office added more essays, asking appli-
cants to discuss the importance of diversity, and tell
about their experiences.
While student leaders have expressed concern
that high school students would not be able to
answer these questions due to lack of experience
with diversity, Monts said the admissions office is
making extra efforts this year to assist high school
students and guidance counselors.
"The admissions staff participates in admissions
fairs and other recruiting activities all over the
nation at which time the new process is explained,"
Monts said. "The staff in the Office of Undergradu-
ate Admissions conducts workshops for individual
high schools and districts on our new policies and
the application process."
In February, former University President James
Duderstadt said in an interview that he thought the
University should focus more on direct recruit-
ment efforts to bring minorities to campus, in
addition to considering race in admissions. He
mentioned his own agenda, "The Michigan Man-
date," which he implemented during his presiden-
cy from 1988 to 1996.
"The Michigan Mandate focused on outreach
into various population centers, high schools, mid-

dle schools, providing financial support, academic
support (and) changing the campus culture to
embrace diversity as necessary for excellence;"
Duderstadt said. "President (Lee) Bollinger chose
to go in somewhat a different direction, so many of
those programs were dismantled."
Monts also said that the rising cost of tuition
might deter potential students, but added the Uni-
versity continues to emphasize financial aid in
recruitment.
The University's population is at an all-time high
with increases in most schools, in a year when tite
University took a 10 percent budget cut from the
state. But University spokeswoman Julie Peterson
said enrollment management is a "complicated
process" and schools base their annual enrollment
targets on a number of issues.
"I don't see the budget situation causing schools
to shrink the size of their enrollment," Peterson
said. "I don't see colleges saying, 'first and fore-
most, let's cut our enrollment."'
The University noticed significant growth in
several colleges including the schools of Educa-
tion and Nursing. Education saw a jump from
611 students to 662 students. Nursing numbers
went from 815 to 841. Peterson said she believes
this may be due to shortages in both fields.
Administrators from both colleges did not return
phone calls yesterday.
The study also showed a 2-percent growth in
international students. But Peterson noted the
growth was less than in previous years, due to
stricter visa regulations.

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COLLEGE CLEANERS: PROF. Dry Clean-
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