100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 12, 2003 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2003-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 12, 2003 - 7A

WORLD
Continued from Page 1A
remembered all those killed by terror-
ism since the Sept. 11 attacks, includ-
ing U.N. personnel who died when a
bomb exploded at the world body's
Baghdad headquarters last month.
At Yokosuka Naval Base just south
of Tokyo, U.S. military personnel held
a wreath-laying service, while people
across Japan paid their respects at
memorials to the thousands who died,
including 24 Japanese.
"Why were those innocent citizens
victimized?" asked Japan's prime min-
ister, Junichiro Koizumi. "The people's
anger against terrorism will never
peter out."
In Baghdad, the U.S. administrator
for Iraq and the commander of Ameri-
can forces joined about 100 civilians
and soldiers for a moment of silence at
Saddam Hussein's former Republican
Palace in Baghdad.
L. Paul Bremer and Lt. Gen. Ricar-
do Sanchez bowed their heads as a
Scottish bagpiper played "Amazing
Grace."
At the U.S. Embassy in the Philip-
pines, U.S. Charge d' Affaires Joseph
Mussomeli laid a wreath by the mis-
sion's flagpole, where the U.S. flag
was at half staff.
In Australia, hundreds of expatriate

Americans and volunteers planted
3,000 trees in a Sydney park in
remembrance of the dead, among them
at least 10 Australians.
Australian Prime Minister John
Howard said the battle against terror-
ists would not end anytime soon.
Top Russian officials also paid
homage to the victims of Sept. 11, say-
ing Russia's solidarity with the United
States was born from shared experi-
ence.
"The day on which the black cloud
of dust from the collapsed skyscrapers
overcast the blue sky over New York
will go down in world history," Russ-
ian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov said.
Moscow has portrayed its battle
against rebels in Chechnya as part of
the international struggle against ter-
rorism.
In Brussels, Belgium, the 15 Euro-
pean Union governments issued a joint
statement reaffirming their "close soli-
darity" with the United States.
Polish Prime Minister Leszek Miller
told a memorial ceremony at the U.S.
Embassy in Warsaw that "there are
times when it seems the sun is not
shining, just like two years ago."
In China's Muslim northwest, the
regional Communist Party secretary
seized the occasion to warn that sepa-
ratists in the country's Xinjiang region
were getting training from internation-
al terrorists, including at "several

training camps in Pakistan."
In Muslim majority Pakistan, about
150 people, mostly children, held a
memorial service in Lahore.
"We want to show the world that
we are not terrorists," said Aneela
Amir, coordinator of the Insan
Foundation, a peace group that
organized the rally. "In fact we Pak-
istanis are peace-loving people..
We pray for the people who died in
the World Trade Center."
In Afghanistan, residents of Kabul
reveled in the changes since the United
States ousted the Taliban regime.
"Two years ago, I was in Iran and
didn't follow the news. Sept. 11 does-
n't mean anything to me, but I'm
happy to be back. It's much better now
that the war is over," said Leila Ahma-
di, 25, who returned to Kabul with her
family five months ago.
In New York, several events were
scheduled to honor the victims who
died two years ago. Two by two they
stepped forward at ground zero yester-
day, the sons and daughters, nieces and
nephews, grandsons and granddaugh-
ters of the Sept. 11 victims, mournful-
ly reciting the 2,792 names of the
World Trade Center dead.
"My mother and my hero," 13-year-
old Brian Terzian said after reading the
name of his mother, Stephanie
McKenna. "We love you."

Carndle ikI
silence ,4over
aver Dzg
~"unu'zgviki
VIGIL
Continued from Page 1A
New York City Police Depart-
ment, spoke on the conflict
between national safety and per-
sonal freedoms.
"It is a mark of our society, our
free democracy, that we can wres-
tle with this question," Oates
said.
Black Student Union Speaker
Boatemaa Ntiri was the last of
the evening's speakers. Ntiri, an
LSA senior, reminded the audi-
ence that the events of Sept. 11
were everyone's loss.
"The 9-11 attacks were color-
blind ... did we forget that the
race that suffered the greatest
loss was the human race?" Ntiri
said.
As Ntiri's speech finished, Taps
was played and candles were lit
by community and religious lead-
ers.
The flame was passed from
student to student until the entire
Diag was aglow.
MSA officers commented that
the turnout was much lower than
last year's vigil.
LSA freshman Amber Janis
said, "I think that it's really good
that they are making an active
effort and remembering Septem-
ber 11."
"But, I am still sad that more
students will come to Saturday's
football game than came here,"
she added.

CHALK
Continued from Page 1A
"We stand with the campus community and we were
offended by the chalkings," Raham said. "The chalk-
ings publicize Sept. 11 and come at a bad time."
LSA junior and former Michigan Student Assembly
Rep. Paul Spurgeon said he was saddened after seeing
the chalkings yesterday morning.
"September 11 is supposed to be a time when we
come together," said Spurgeon. "The chalkings were so
big and colorful that obviously it was intended to be
written. It wasn't just some drunk message."
"But I understand that someone is using their free-
dom-of-speech right even if we do find who wrote
them, but I'm going to use my freedom of speech too,"
* the michigan daily 2

Spurgeon added.
College Democrats Chair Jenny Nathan's inbox was
flooded yesterday morning with e-mails from students
reacting to the chalkings.
"What was written plays on people's insecurities,
especially on a day like this," said Nathan.
"I'm just disturbed by what happened, it really shows
bad taste."
Facilities and Operations spokeswoman Diane Brown
said the University has no policy on chalkings on side-
walks.
"The University strongly supports freedom of expres-
sion and since the chalkings were not down on vertical
surfaces, we are not in an a position to censor," said
Brown. "But it's unfortunate that someone would write
something offensive to some people."

TOP: Naljorma Drolma shields her
candle during yesterday's
anniversary vigil on the Diag.
(SETH LOWER/Daily)
LEFT: LSA senior Ruben Duran
holds a flag on the dlag thursday,
sept 11, 2003 (FOREST
CASEY/Daily)

NOW HIRING DRIVERS!
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
DAYTIME AND CLOSING SHIFTS
Inside and Management Available
Apply in person
Daily Interviews from 1 pm-8-pm
REQUIREMENTS:
YOUR OWN DEPENDABLE AUTO
GOOD DRIVING RECORD
CASH BONUS FOR
EXPERIENCED PERSONNEL
Contact Darren at
231-342-2973
Accepting Applications Today at
401 East Huron
623-7272
IMMEDIATE OPPENINGS
$11.25 base/appt. NoExp. Needed!! Temp or
Permanent. PT/FT. Scholarships avail.
Conditions Apply. Customer Sales / Service.
Mustbe18+
Call: 734-944-1223
www.workforstudent.com
INTERNSHIPFOR MUSIC AGENCY
Booking agency for national acts. 477-6677
LAW OFFICE (Ann Arbor) Assistant
Needed: General office duties including an-
swering phones, scheduling appointments, fil-
ing, copying, running errands. Strong com-
munication, computer and proofreading
skills. Hours needed are Mondays, 11:30 - 5:00,
Tuesdays 8:00-12:00, and Wednesdays
12:00-5:00. Send resume and transcripts to
Karen Beggs, fax: 332-8701 or
eldedaw@ameritech.net
MICHIGAN TELEFUND NOW HIRING
students for flexible night and weekend sche-
dules. Earn great money and make new
friends while supporting your University. Awesome
Resume Builder! Work Study /Non-Work
Study. Apply online: www.telefund.umich.edu.
998-7420.
MOVIE EXTRAS/ MODELS NEEDED.
No exp. req. Earn up to $500 - $1000/day.
1-888-820-0167. ext ul83.
MYCOLOGIST (TO BE) 20 flexible hours
per wk. Lab and culture exp. req. email re-
sume to scott@jemfarms.com
OFFICE PERSON NEEDED; 8-10 hrs./wk.;
$7/hr.; Work-Study Preferred; Spin Physics
Cr.; Contact Debbie 936-1027.
PAID EXPERIMENT $20. Fun group com-
puter game, 3 hours eves. Central Campus. Go
to Experiments.org to sign up.
PAID LISTENERS NEEDED for semester
long study at kresge hearing research.
onsan@umich.edu
PHYSICAL ASST. NEEDED for disabled
male law student. Pay neg., well trained, call
Chris at 734-761-9551.

SCOREKEEPERS IS NOW HIRING Cooks,
Floormen and Waitstaff. Apply in person at
310 Maynard,A2 - 995-0100.
TUTOR NEEDED FOR a Japanese business-
man and his wife based in Ann Arbor to help
in conversational English. 2-4 hrs./wk.
$15-18/hr. Japanese language skill desired.
Call: 996-9616. Email: hayashin@umich.edu
or tmagoril69241MI@comcast.net
UP TO $300/HR., male models wanted for
amateur photo/video work. Must be in shape
and eager to show off. No exp. nec. E-mail
models@themailbox.com for information.
UP TO $500/WK. processing mail. Get paid
for each piece. Create your own schedule.
Call: (626)821-4061.
WANT TO BE A STAR? Hollywood pro-
duction company seeking videos for TV
Show. Win $2500! Info:
www.crazycollegepranks.com

' A 4
Join America's #I Student Tour Operator
CANCUN
ACAPULCO
JAMAICA
BAHAMAS
FLORIDA
Call for group dis ounts

ANN ARBOR
Continued from Page 1A
This was not the first rally YAF held in accordance to the
events of Sept. 11. Hours after the attacks on Sept. 11, YAF
State Chairman Doug Teitz said YAF initiated a rally on the
Diag. "People from around the University joined in - in
solidarity. People were shocked and wanted to show sup-
port for America," he said.
But only a couple years later, Teitz said that many people
on campus have forgotten what happened.
"The campus has reverted to its liberal ways and contin-
ues to view America as the great evil in the world," said
YAF Co-Chair Laura Davis.
Teitz added that the greater population has also forgotten
who remain enemies to America as well as the country's
way of life. "Many people have already forgotten (that)
there are still soldiers in the field and that enemies of yes-
terday are still enemies of today. On some degree, the Uni-
versity has gone back to an apathetic state," he said.
As one of multiple events taking place in remembrance
of Sept. 11, Davis said that YAF differentiates itself from
the vigil sponsored by the Michigan Student Assembly in
its concern with patriotism.
Raham said his primary concern with last night's vigil
was its lack of the American flag being prominently dis-
played by a color guard during the vigil. Instead he
instructed members ofYAF to arrive early and bring flags.

But Ann Arbor Area Committee co-coordinator and
Interfaith Council member Chuck Warpehoski said that the
vigil his group held last night celebrated the idea of peace
and brotherhood.
Their Sept. 11 evening peace vigil began with a circle of
silence for the events that occurred. The silence continued
for 45 minutes and ended only with the sound of the gong.
AAAC Coordinator Phillis Engelbert said that the vigil and
organization are aimed at "calling for peaceful resolutions
rather than the endless war on terror."
Warpehoski said that although there is a lot of grief asso-
ciated with Sept. 11, he said he feels the vigil can capture
the ideal of future peace for the world.
"The vigil is a chance for Sept. 11th families who lost
loved ones to come together and not only mourn their fami-
ly members, but also to envision a more peaceful world,"
Warpehoski said.
Unlike the AAAC's vigil last year, Jewish residents
worked collaboratively with Muslims to organize the event.
Last year, the vigil was planned exclusively by Muslims -
with no interfaith collaboration.
Warpehoski said they hope that this show of interfaith
unity to support the vigil will "provide a model for other
communities across the nation."
He added that one central hope of the organization is that
Sept. 11 will never occur again, and with that there, will be
no more victims of terror in the United States or in any
other parts of the world.

TRAVEL
---SERVICES

TRAVEL
Michigan Union Grondn Fl
734-769-2555
1218 S. University Ae.
734-998-0200

WANTED VETERINARY ASST. / RECEP-
TIONIST. P/T, will train. 668-1466.

***SPRING BREAK - sign up with Student
Express & get FREE roundtrip airline tickets
to over 15 International destinations- incl.
Aruba, Dominican Republic, Costa Rica,
Caribbean hot spots & more. Why go with
anyone else. Limited offer - call now.
Commission rep. positions avail. now.
Call:800-787-3787. www.studentexpress.com

i a

ABLE HOUSEHOLD/ CHILDCARE helper
wanted. Busy household is looking for an ex-
tra pair of hands after school to help with
cooking & childcare. Any afternoons. Pay
$11/hr. Own car, non-smoking. 741-9860.
AFTER SCHOOL SITTER Wanted for 1st
grade boy. Tu., Wed., Th. 3:30 - 5:30. Call:
662-9505.
AFTER SCHOOL SUPERVISION for 11 yr
old boy. 2-4 days /wk. 3pm-5:30pm. Slauson
School, West side home. Pay generous, car
req. Call: 994-0810
BABYSITTER NEEDED FOR infant in our
A2 home w/ parent on premises. 10-15 hrs.-
/wk. Weekday afternoons, own transporta-
tion, refs. req. Call 668-7009.
BABYSITTER WANTED FOR 1 yr. old.
6-9 hrs./wk., refs., & own transport. $10/hr.
Call Liz 332-9618.
FUN JOB WORKING with young children.
Substitutes needed work according to your
schedule. Guys and foreign language speak-
ers welcome to apply too. Call St. Paul Early
Childhood Center 668-0887.
LOVING, MATURE BABYSITTER needed
to care for our 4 yr. old son. 1 to 2 afternoon-
s/wk. (Tues. and/or Thurs.) from 12:00-4:45 p.m.
Must have reliable car & references. $10/hr.
734-761-8844.
PART-TIME NANNY needed on Thursdays
8am-5pm. To care for two excellent kids, 3
and 5 yrs old in Ann Arbor. Great Pay! Call:
741-5873 or 622-5648.
PLAY BARBIES AND other fun stuff w/our
4 yr. old. 2 afternoons/wk. 1-4pm. Must have
child care experience and reliable car.
$10/hr.313-363-5719.
RESPONSIBLE YOUNG WOMAN needed
to drive our 8 yr. old daughter to school,
Mon.,Tues., Fri. Plymouth to Ann Arbor.
Drive time: l hr.= $20/day. 734-341-7767.
i.. ' 1

GREAT RATES ON Airport Trans. SAVE
BIG between 9 am and 5 pm. By apt. only.
Call SAM from 10am-10pm. (734)944-6070.
KEEP THIS NUMBER - too drunk/hung-
over/studious to attend game? Call me (last
minute ok). Alum needs 2 tix to ND game.
I'll take anything. Just graduated so not
much money to spend. 657-6469.
MICHIGAN FOOTBALL I Need ND, Pur,
OSU Tix.(Non-Student Pref.) 734-327-8912.
REAL FAN NEEDS to take 10 year old son
to Michigan/ Notre Dame game. Needs tick-
ets to raise son as a Michigan Wolverine
fan. Call 586-350-3606.

WANTED 2 OSU Football Tickets.
alumni with more money than sense seek
OSU tix. Call Tom @ 850-712-9095
tjj757@earthlink.net

2
2

WANTED FOOTBALL TICKETS FOR
NOTRE DAME GAME. Call: 213-326-5776.

ECURREN.COM: ANN ARBOR'S
best entertainment website.
Music, cinema, stage!

LOOKING FORA ROOMMATE?
Roommate matching @ Huron River Apts.
$450/bdrm. $250/deposit Short term leases
available. www.hrpaa.com or call: 996-4992.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan