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November 12, 2002 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, November 12, 2002 - 7

INTEGRITY
Continued from Page 1
innate for us to cheat."
University faculty are currently more concerned
with clarifying the issue and learning more about
its effects on campus before taking any direct meas-
ures against the acts. Tomorrow's meeting will deal
more with education than with establishing guide-
lines for punishment, organizers said.
"Even if we talk of a sense of community integri-
ty, the more important issue is personal integrity,"
Rice said. "And while we've been talking about ini-
tiating a dialogue this year on academic integrity,
we might not come up with solutions as much as
we will raise awareness of the issue."
The accessibility of information through the
Internet and other forms of mass media has compli-
cated the problem; and many University faculty
members said they believe that academic dishon-
esty needs to be redefined in the context of new
avenues of information.
"Much has changed in regard to the Internet. In
English, at least, that certainly accounts for a huge
amount of what we see in regards to plagiarism,"
English Prof. John Whittier-Ferguson said.
Increasing occurrences of plagiarism and cheat-
ing have incited other universities, such as Duke
University and the University of Virginia, to imple-
ment strict honor codes as a preventive measure for
dishonest behavior.
This may be one possible way for the University
of Michigan to address incidences of academic dis-
honesty before freshmen ever enter the classroom.
"Maybe the best we can hope for is that the
presence of an honor code will clarify what our
expectations as a college are with respect to aca-
demic integrity. You're going to have to look pret-
ty far and wide to find that definition here right
now,"Rice said.
But some students are hesitant to believe that
this would be an effective measure for eliminating

"While we've been talking
about initiating a dialogue
this year on academic
integrity, we might not
come up with solutions as
much as we will raise
awareness of the issue."
- Louis Rice
College Academic Judiciary Committee
coordinator
inappropriate behavior.
"I don't think (honor codes) would have much
of an effect because I know a lot of professors who
already do that'when they give tests. I think a lot of
students just wouldn't follow it," LSA senior
Christina Chau said.
In spite of this skepticism, honor codes remain
a possibility for the future. LSA Student Govern-
ment has created an Honor Code Implementation
Task Force to push for a standard of integrity.
"I believe that an honor code would enforce the
idea that honesty is essential to our university,"
task force chair Jesse Knight said.
The University has also created a website
focusing on academic integrity to stimulate con-
versation between students and faculty in hopes
of finding a solution.
"In the larger sense, the whole premise of the
university is that people are working in a large
group with a common purpose; and when you
violate the trust within that group, you can
destroy the respect for that institution," Whittier-
Ferguson added.

WEBSITE
Continued from Page 1
versity of Florida - AlcoholEdu.edu is based
on personalized feedback, customizable ques-
tions, surveys and educational resources.
But AlcoholEdu follows the format of a
class textbook, with chapters pertaining to
alcohol in society, how alcohol is metabo-
lized, how different dosages affect behavior,
learning and memory and why people use
alcohol in the first place.
Students take an assessment quiz at the
beginning and a final exam at the end of
the course to see what they knew and what
they learned.
MyStudentBody, on the other hand, focuses
on rating students' risks, beliefs and lifestyles
and compares them to other students in order
to give users an idea of how they compare to
other students, as well as to access the conse-

quences of their behavior.
"We ask them about their living arrange-
ments, the organizations they are involved in,
the different consequences involved with
their drinking. As they go through these
questions, they get feedback as to how they
stand with the average student drinker. Peo-
ple who receive ┬░this form of feedback tend
to moderate their drinking," said MyStudent-
Body.com spokesman Emil Chiauzzi, direc-
tor of multimedia development at Inflexxion,
Inc., which created the site.
Personal stories and student-written arti-
cles are also available on the site, as well as
an "ask the expert" section.
Chiauzzi added that while the website con-
forms to national definitions of alcohol
abuse and binge drinking - five drinks in
one sitting for males and four for females -
it is not trying to blow the problem out of
context.

"College students, compared to other peo-
ple their age, tend to drink more, and it's part
of the culture," he said, adding that about 50
percent of students will binge drink within a
two-week time frame. "The average person
is not getting sloppy drunk every week, but
most college students do drink. We are not
looking to demonize the problem."
Both websites take a more hands-off
approach to alcohol abuse prevention,
which Chiauzzi said has proven to be more
effective when working with adults.
"A lot of people are just used to being
told what to do and our approach is more
to allow people to make an informed deci-
sion about their own personal risks," he
said. "If you moralize and try to control
behavior, they turn off. They are not inter-
ested in being told what to do. They want a
sense of feeling that they are able to make
their own decisions."

PARENTHOOD
Continued from Page 1
offered by North Campus Family Health
Services and daycare programs, like the
Family Housing Child Development Cen-
ter and Pound House. The University Cen-
ter for the Child and Family offers
professional mental health services for
families on a sliding scale and a child-care
subsidy program.
"The family and child care resources make
for a supportive environment," Tucker said.
Both Tucker and Gomez said the Kids
Kare at Home program has been especially
helpful. These programs provide licensed
professionals to the homes of student-par-
ents when a child is sick and consequen-
tially cannot attend school or daycare.
Tucker added that her views on life as a

student-parent differ from those of other
student parents as her son is now 12 years
old and does not require the same type of
care and attention that younger children
need.
"I think people who have really young kids
will find things different because infant care is
hard to find and also expensive," she said.
This perspective also applies to her views
on the parenting resources offered by the
University. "In comparison to my undergrad-
uate institution, I would say that they are a
lot better, but that is also because my son is a
lot older," Tucker said.
Gomez agreed that the University offers
a lot of resources, but feels that they do
not publicize them enough to new stu-
dents. She said that the University gives
the impression that student-parents should
be more proactive in finding programs and

other resources.
Limited room available in programs is also a
problem, Tucker said.
"The number of slots for care on cam-
pus is very low in comparison to the num-
ber of kids that need that care," she said.
Tusker said one of the reasons she feels there
is limited room in the daycare programs is
because the University staff also use the pro-
grams.
But the most difficult challenges that face
student parents come from unexpected compli-
cations, Gomez said.
"Today she was sick and I stayed home,"
Gomez said. "I had something to submit to a
group project at 3."
"The biggest thing for me is finding your
own network of support," Gomez added,
stressing the importance of making friends
that are able to understand her situation.

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