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November 11, 2002 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 2002-11-11

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4B - The Michigan Daily - SportsMonday - November 11, 2002

MICHIGAN 41, MINNESOTA 24

GAME STATISTICS

Team Stats
First Downs
Rushes/Yards
Passing Yards
Offensive Plays
Total Offense
Return Yards
Comp/Att/Int
Punts/Avg
Fumbles/Lost
Penalties/Yards
Time of Poss

MICH
22
48/253
225
74
74/478
108
15/26/0
3/47.3
1/1
7/67
34:28

MINN
23
36/127
209
73
73/336
71
18/37/3
4/34.5
1/0
2/25
25:32

Blue continues Jug dominance
Linebacker Kaufman out for the season with an injured knee

a

By Jeff Phillips
Daily Sports Editor

M I C H I G A N

PASSING
Player
Navarre
Totals
RUSHING
Player
Askew
Perry
Underwood
Bellamy
Bracken
Navarre
Totals
RECEIVING
Player
Bellamy
Edwards
Joppru
Gonzales
Askew
Perry
Totals

C-A
15-25
15-25

1

Att
11
19
13
1
2
2
48
No.
5
4
3
15

PUNTING
Player
Finley
Totals
KICKOFF RETURNS
Player No.
LeSueur 2
Bracken 2
Totals 4

PUNT RETURNS
Player I
Curry, M.
Woods
Totals

No.
1

Yds
126
60
42
18
8
-1
253
Yds
50
75
58
24
10
8
225
No.
3
3
Yds
59
33
35
Yds
4
12
30
Solo
7
5
4
5
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
0
48
Yds
2
0
0
0
0
2

Yds
225
225
Avg
11.5
3.2
3.2
18
4.0
-0.5
5.3
Avg
10.0
18.8
19.3
24.0
10.0
8.0
15.0

TD
2
2
Lg
59
16
12
18
7
3
59
Lg
17
36
25
24
10
8
36

Int
0
0
TO
2
0
O
0
0
3
TD
1
0
0
0
0
2

Yds Avg Lg
142 47.3 54
142 47.3 54

DEFENSE
Player
Diggs
Sarantos
Shaw
Stevens
LeSueur
Hobson
Lazarus
Kaufman
Orr
Jackson
Williams
Curry
Rumishek
Hueur
Bowman
Drake
Spytek
McClintock
Avant
Stewart
Massaquoi
Totals

Avg Lg
29.5 30
16.5 20
23 30
Avg Lg
4.0 4
12.0 12
7.5 13
Asst
0
2
3 !
1 !
0
0
.O
2
0
0
0
0
0
0 .
0
0
14

MINNEAPOLIS - Saturday's Michigan-Minnesota
game ended the same way the past 13 had: With the
Wolverines running onto the field, dancing around
while holding the Little Brown Jug. Michigan now
holds a 65-23-3 record in this lopsided rivalry and has
won 31 of the last 33 games between the two schools.
A big, old, reddish-brown jug inscribed with the
results of each of the teams' meetings is hardly the
" prettiest trophy in football.
"It is an ugly trophy, but it is FOOTBALL
something that means a lot," captain
Victor Hobson said. Notebook
Despite the Wolverines' domi-
nance and the trophy's lack of attractiveness, the Little
a Brown Jug has lost no prominence with the team.
"I really respect the tradition of the Little Brown
Yr. Jug," Michigan coach Lloyd Carr said. "It's one of the
W greatest traditions in college football and we were able
- to hold onto it."
The fact that the trophy is the oldest in college foot-
ball is the major reason the teams covet it.
"The history of the trophy makes it very important
to our program," fullback B.J. Askew said.
K'. For Minnesota native Bennie Joppru, who played the
Gophers for the final time, winning the trophy has
extra significance as a captain.
"Six months ago, if you would have told me I would
t be carrying the Jug for the team when we go back to
(Minneapolis) ... It's something that when I was elect-
'~ ~ ed captain I was looking forward to, if I had the oppor-
k tunity," Joppru said.
Michigan has never lost the Little Brown Jug under
'N, Carr, who is now 6-0 against Minnesota.
SURF ON TURF: With the win, Michigan is now 9-0
against Minnesota in the Metrodome. The turf in the
. stadium is thinner than the FieldTurf that most schools
AP PHOTO are now playing on and that the Wolverines are consid-
Michigan defenders Shantee Orr and Cato June celebrate another win over Minnesota by parading ering installing next season. Illinois and Wisconsin
on the field with the Little Brown Jug. Teammate Tony Pape accused Orr of being a "jug hog." already play on the innovative surface.
Michigan takes advantage : u7.ME".

The thinner turf meant that the game speed was
accelerated, something that the Michigan slayers
believed worked to their advantage.
"The turf is obviously a fast surface. We enjo3 play-
ing on the surface and we felt we had the advmtage
there," Hobson said.
"Playing on turf is fun sometimes - you feel alittle
bit faster, a little bit quicker on turf," offensive line-
man Tony Pape said. "I think it gives the advantge to
the faster team and we were the faster team today.
STILL MORE INJURIES: Already weakened by injiries,
the Michigan defense took another blow against Min-
nesota, when linebacker Zach Kaufman was lost for
the remainder of the season due to a knee injury.
Kaufman is the third linebacker to be lost fa the
season, joining Roy Manning and Lawrence leid.
Redshirt freshman Joey Sarantos stepped up nicely,
but the depth of the team is still being tested.
"We are not a very healthy football team right rmw,"
Carr said.
Safety Cato June returned to the field, but for only
two plays. Carr said this was a last resort move as
the secondary is even thinner thannthe linebacer
corps. June said he would take more than two sips
against Wisconsin next week. Michigan will need
him to, as cornerback Zia Combs and safety Julus
Curry's season status is still up in the air. Safety
Ernest Shazor also did not play against the Gophers
after coming down with turf toe in practice. Ofi:-n-
sively, lineman AdamStenavich is expected tbe
back next week.
JACKSON SETS RECORD: Against Minnesota, comer-
back Marlin Jackson notched his 16th pass breakup of
the season, breaking Charles Woodson's school record.
But the breakup might be remembered more for the
touchdown that never was than the record-breaker.
The play came in the second quarter when Gophers
quarterback Asad Abdul-Khaliq overthrew his receiver
and Jackson nearly picked off the ball, but he could
not keep control of it. Had he intercepted it, tiere
would have been little Minnesota could do to stop the
return from earning Michigan six points.

TD
TO
0
0
TD
O
0
0
Tot
7.0
TO
6
5.5
5.5
3.5
3.5
3.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
0.5
55
TD
1 0
0
1 0
1 0
1 0
6 0

4
4

PASS DEFENSE
Player
Sarantos
Shaw
LeSueur
Jackson
Massey
Totals

Int
1
0
3

Lg
2
0
0
0
0
2

Brk-up
1
2
6

of Minnesota'
GOPHERS
Continued from Page 11B
and got one foot down to give Michigan
a 27-17 lead.
"(The blocked punt) was definitely
the biggest play of the game for us,"
Michigan coach Lloyd Carr said. "There
are always some plays that change the
momentum for a team and that block
did so in many ways for us."
"(The blocked punt) put a dent in us,"
Burns said. "It was deep in our territory,
it put them on the 10-yard line. It really
hurt us."
Michigan (5-1 Big Ten, 8-2 overall)
rode fullback-turned-tailback B.J.
Askew for the final 15 minutes. Askew
pounded away at a decimated Minnesota
defense, scoring two touchdowns - one
on a 59-yard run - to give the Wolver-
ines an insurmountable 41-17 lead.
Askew finished the game with 126
yards rushing on 11 carries to garner his
second straight 100-yard rushing per-

mistakes

M i n n e s o t a

formance, as the Wolverines rolled to
their highest rushing output (259 yards)
of the season.
"We came into the game emphasizing
the run, and I thought we did a good job
of sticking with it," Askew said. "Our
offensive line did a great job of block-
ing for us."
Minnesota (3-3, 7-3) was able to run
and pass the football on the Michigan
defense for most of the night, but three
interceptions and errors in the kicking
game signaled the death of the
Gophers.
"They definitely weren't stopping us,"
Abdul-Khaliq said. "Anything that hap-
pened that was bad was because of
something that we did."
"It's field position," said Minnesota
coach Glen Mason, who has never beat-
en Michigan in his tenure as head
coach. "You get a punt blocked, a snap
over a guy's head. You can't play Michi-
gan on a short field - they're too
good."

PASSING
Player
Abdul-Khaliq
Gruening
Totals
RUSHING
Player
Jackson
Abdul-Khaliq
Mathews
Tapeh
Mays
Totals
RECEIVING
Player
Burns
Patterson
Utecht
Ward
Hosack
Baugus
Mathews
Mays
Totals

C-A
17-36
1-1
18-37

Y
1
2

Atn
19
13
1
1
1
36
No.
7
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
18

PUNTING
Player
Team
Gruening
Totals
KICKOFF RETURNS
Player No.
Burns 1
Mays 2
Total 3

Yds
89
67
13
0
-4
127
Yds
69
40
23
28
20
17
10
2
209
No.
1
3
4
Yds
17
37
54
Yds
17
17
Solo
13
6
5
5
52
Yds
O
0
O
S 0

Yds
181
28
209
Avg
4.7
5.2
13.0
0.0
-4.0
3.5
Avg
9.9
10.0
11.5
28.0
20.0
17.0
10.0
2.0
11.6
Yds
O
138
138
Avg
17.0
18.5
18

TD
2
0
2
Lg
28
12
13
0
0
28
Lg
27
17
15
28
20
17
10
2
28

Int
3
O
3
O
0
0
-4.0
1
TD
O
0
0
0
0
0
2

Sarantos & Co. step up and
become November s champs

AP PHOTO
Michigan defensive lineman Pierre Woods breaks through the Minnesota line to
block a punt in the third quarter.

Avg Lg
0.0 0
46.0 51
34.5 51

Lg
17
22
22

PUNT RETURNS
Player I
Upchurch
Totals

N.o.
2
2

Avg Lg
8.5 11
8.5 11

TD
0
0
O
TD
0
0

DEFENSE
Player
Ward
Campbell
West
Losli
Totals

As
Lng
0
0
0
O
0

,st Total
5 15.5
3 7.5
2 6.0
1 5.5
22 63.0
Brk-up TD
1 O
1 0
1 0
1 0
4 '0

HORN
Continued from Page 1B
for a guy who was.getting his first shot
with the first defensive unit.
His interception was one of three for
Michigan; each killed an important Min-
nesota drive, and each came from a guy
who hadn't nabbed one yet this season.
LeSueur and Shaw were the other two
thieves.
The biggest play of the game came
courtesy of Woods. When Minnesota tied
the game at 17, Michigan responded with
an Adam Finley field goal. On the ensuing
Minnesota drive the defense forced a
quick punt, which was emphatically
blocked by Woods. A wildly acrobatic
Braylon Edwards touchdown reception
gave Michigan a 10-point cushion, and the
Wolverines did not look back. LeSueur's
interception came off the next Minnesota
possession, and Michigan scored again.
The big plays from these otherwise
quiet defensive competitors were what
kept Michigan afloat and the Wolverines
engaged on Saturday night. It was the dif-
ference between a team playing for a BCS
at-large bid and one that has to answer

questions about folding against meager
opposition. They were the save-the-day
plays that may be forgotten years later by
fans, but will never be forgotten by the
players and coaches. They were the plays
that make Michigan football players
Michigan men.
"I grew up a Wolverine fan," Sarantos
said. "Both my parents went here, my
grandparents went here, my sister went
here. I grew up the biggest Maize and
Blue fan you can imagine. When I finally
got to come here it was like a dream come
true. Now that I'm playing here, being out
there on defense, it's a dream come true.
"I can feel that (actually being a
Wolverine) is more real."
Champions are made in November?
Michigan won't be national champion this
season, and it won't be champion of the
Big Ten. But in a game that could have
been an unnecessary black eye on the
2002 campaign, Sarantos and company
certainly became champions in their own
right.
David Horn can be reached at
hornd@lumich.edu.

Askewt
answers
the call at
tailback
By Joe Smith
Daily Sports Editor
MINNEAPOLIS - Michigan
offensive coordinator Terry Nalone
may have finally found himself a
durable starting tailback.
And he didn't have to look very far.
Senior fullback B.J. Askew has
made quite the campaign fir the
position throughout the pa;t two
weeks while tailback Chris Peiry has
been hampered by an injured akle.
Askew rushed 11 times fcr 126
yards Saturday night, markig the
second straight game the Cincinnati
native has rushed for more than 100
yards. Askew's hard running and con-
sistency has the Michigan coaching
staff tempted to use the versatile back
even more.
"If he keeps running the way he
is, he's going to keep getting the
ball," Malone said. "I would think
that as long as Chris (Perry) is not
100 percent, I kind of like the idea of
B.J. playing tailback for us. I think
he has an amount of toughness that
you need in these Big Ten games.
He's constantly pouring it up the
field."
Askew's ability to break tackles
and hold onto the football (just one
fumble all season) has helped make
him the recent go-to guy in the
Michigan backfield. Askew is also
the Wolverines' fourth-leading
receiver with 28 receptions, making
him an intricate part of Michigan's
offense. This is nothing new to
Askew, who served as Michigan's
starting tailback last season, rushing
for more than 900 yards and 10
touchdowns.
"If there's a more valuable player, I
don't know who it is," Michigan
coach Lloyd Carr said. "Because he's
really played a wonderful role on our
football team. And he's done it all
year long."
Before this season, Carr tought
this was the year Perry would finally
carry the load for the Wolverines.
The injury-plagued junior started out
strong, compiling nearly 700 yardsin
his first eight games. But a sore
ankle has limited Perry's effeaive-
ness and playing time the past two
games, as he's rushed for just 109
yards over that span.
Saturday, after carrying the bal 17
times in the first half, Perry limped
off the field early in the third quarter
and played sparingly thereafter.
That's when the opportunistic

a

d.

PASS DEFENSE
Player
West
Isom
Williams
Montgomery
Totals

int
O
O
0

PLAYERS OF THE GAME:

Safety Jon Shaw was one of a number of unsung Michigan players that stepped
up in the Wolverines' win..

4

Ohio State president encourages tolerance from fans

COLUMBUS (AP) - Go ahead, boo Michi-
gan. Just be nice about it.
Ohio State University officials, not wanting to
ban tailgating or, other game-day fun, are encour-
aging football fans to be more respectful.
Iniversity President Karen Holbrook has

tion, of setting a tone of tolerance."
Ohio State officials also are trying to quiet the
wild parties that have occurred in recent years
near campus.
When large off-campus parties led to property
destruction last soring, the university joined

includes foul language, lewd T-shirts and taunt-
ing fans and coaches of opposing teams - works
against the university's attempt to promote aca-
demics. She said Ohio State has a chance to be a
national leader in tackling the issue.
"The kind of story I'm trying to tell is we have

AN

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