100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 07, 2002 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2002-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, November 7, 2002 - 7A
Enrollment figures up at colleges all over nation

By Lydia K. Leung
Daily Staff Reporter
More students than ever are flooding
campuses nationwide this fall and enroll-
ment figures show it, University of Michi-
gan officials said.
While increased enrollment is beneficial to
many private colleges, it is aggravating other
public universities with tighter budgets amid
the sluggish economy, according to a report in
the Chronicle of Higher Education.
University spokeswoman Julie Peterson
said one explanation for the increase is there
are more college-age students.
"The number of students graduating from
high school is growing each year. They are the
children of the baby boomers. More students
are applying to college and that number is
continuing to grow through the year of 2010,"
Peterson said.
From 1999 to 2001, the number of fresh-
men applications received by the University
increased by more than 3,000 applicants,
according to data provided by the University.
"Our applications have been soaring every

year," Peterson said.
Besides demographics, the economic
downturn is also urging more students to
attend college because of a more competitive
job market, students said.
Business junior Karen Gibbons said more
students are attending college "because they
are afraid they would not be able to find a
job." By attending college, students can enter
the job market when the economy gets better,
Gibbons added.
When the economy presents challenges,
Peterson said many students turn to high-
ranking public schools for continuing edu-
cation.
"When the economy is difficult, the stock
market is falling and people's investment is
losing value," Peterson said. "The top public
universities, like the University of Michigan,
begin to look like a particularly good choice
for people who are concerned about cost and
concerned about getting a quality education."
While some public colleges are planning to
increase tuition to avoid overflowing applica-
tions next year, some private colleges are
doing the opposite to attract more students,

the report said. Among them, Bethany Col-
lege has cut its tuition by 42 percent and its
applications went up by 42 percent.
But Peterson said the University is not
using tuition "as a marketing tool to either
attract or repel students," though it is one of
the most expensive public schools in the
nation.
"Tuition is set at the lowest possible level in
order to provide the resources necessary to
continue the quality of education that we have
in the University," Peterson said. She added
that in order to let students enjoy the
resources provided, the University is trying to
accept fewer students after having large fresh-
men classes the past three years.
Other more-selective private colleges, like
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, are
also reducing the size of their freshmen class-
es, according to the report.
All four University of Texas campuses had
double-digit percentage growths, while Indi-
ana University at Bloomington, the University
of Maine at Orono and South Carolina at
Columbia, took in the largest freshmen class-
es ever, the report stated.

JASON COOPER/Daily
University students walk through the newly renovated Angell Hall on their way to classes yesterday
afternoon.

ROUND-UP
Continued from Page 1A
She added that at the same time,
Land would work on improving serv-
ice in branch offices.
McNulty said Land congratulated
Hollowell on "a positive campaign
that focused on the issues that the
Michigan voters wanted to hear
about."
COLLECTIVE BARGAINING REJECTED
Proposal 02-3, which would have
written into the Michigan Constitu-
tion rights to collective bargaining
with binding arbitration for state
government employees, went down
to defeat Tuesday.
Fifty-four percent of Michigan
voters rejected the proposal, with all
precincts reporting.
Officials from the Michigan
Employee Rights Initiative, the con-
sortium of unions supporting the
proposal were not available for com-
ment.
MERIT argued that while unions
are technically able to bargain with
the state, the Michigan Civil Service
Commission is able to rewrite con-
tracts after they have been signed and
thus some form of protection was
COLEMAN
Continued from Page 1A
Coleman said she hopes to use her
position as University president to help
students find tools they need to figure
out their own solutions. She said she
appreciates the feedback she has been
receiving and hopes it will continue.
"I enjoy hearing about opinions peo-
ple have regardless of whether I can help
or not," Coleman said. "The more I
know, the better."
MSA President Sarah Boot said she
thinks Coleman has added a lot of ener-
gy to the administration and has
responded well to University student
issues.
"I think she's made a real effort to get
in touch with students," she said. "I have

needed for state workers.
Gov. John Engler and the Michi-
gan Chamber of Commerce opposed
the proposal. Currently only state
police troopers have "true bargaining
rights," as defined by MERIT offi-
cials.
LOCAL PARKS MILLAGE APPROVED
Ann Arbor voters overwhelmingly
voted to raise the property tax mill-
age for parks and recreation fund-
ing.
The proposal was approved with
71.6 percent of the vote, thus raising
the millage to its original level of
.4725, which had automatically
declined over several years to .3654,
pursuant to Michigan law. At the
renewed rate, property owners will
pay 47.25 cents for every $1,000 of
property they own.
"We are delighted with the result,"
said Mike Garfield, director of the
Ann Arbor-based Ecology Center. "It
means the city will have the money
to maintain and restore its parks sys-
tem and it should be one of the best
in the country."
The dollars will provide funds for
maintaining newly acquired parks
area as well as making them accessi-
ble to those with disabilities.
no complaints."
MSA communications chair Pete
Woiwole said Coleman should be
applauded for her accomplishments at
the University so far. He said she was
instrumental in designing the response
to the divestment e-mail, and has been
very cooperative with MSA activities,
such as last Saturday's "Blue Out."
But, he said he thinks she should do
more to open her door to students and
take a more aggressive approach to
seeking out those members of the
University community who -have con-
cerns.
"When you hold an office like presi-
dent, it's difficult for people to go to you
consistently," Woiwole said. "When you
put your ear to the ground ... the office
becomes a lot more accessible."

ARTS
Continued from Page 1A
together to produce two Shakespeare plays
and Salman Rushdie's "Midnight's Children,"
which will have its U.S. premiere at the Uni-
versity in March.
According to Karen Wolff, dean of the
Music School, the University is also working
on construction of the Walgreen Drama Cen-
ter, which will house all the drama teaching
space and a new performing space called the
Arthur Miller Theater, named after the famed
playwright and University alum. Currently,
organizers are choosing an architect for the
center and assessing whether the cost of the
project will exceed funds already in hand.
Wolff also talked about the importance of
renovations on Hill Auditorium. "You just
can't overstate the importance of Hill Audito-
rium," she said. "It means everything to be
able to perform music in a building geared
toward acoustics." She also said she believed
that the acoustics in Hill would improve as a
result of the renovations.
English and theater Prof. Enoch Brater was
skeptical of the importance of performing
arts spaces in the College of Literature, Sci-
ence and the Arts. "We have to think about a
program, not a building, that responds to the
needs of our students, and the building will
follow. ... Buildings on their own will not
build a strong community."
Also in the works are plans for the Music
School, the Art Museum and the Russian Stud-
Cox
Continued from Page 1A
first count.
State officials would count the votes again
if the totals are within 2,000 votes of each
other after the State Board of Canvassers cer-
tifies them Nov. 25. Either candidate or their
parties could also request a recount.
The campaign had been confident for some
time that the election would be close and Cox
would prevail, Sandler said.
He said the message he constantly empha-
sized, that Cox gained legal experience as

ies program to jointly put on a St. Petersburg
festival to celebrate the culture and arts of Rus-
sia. The festival will feature the Music School's
departments of dance and theater as well as a
performance by assembled music faculty of
works by Russian artists such as Rachmaninoff.
Support for programs like these come from
several sources, including grants available to
faculty members in the Music School, the
general fund budget for the School, and inter-
est from the Music School endowment. The
Music School is the fifth largest school in the
University with more than 1,000 students,
and tuition from those students is available
for commissioning new works.
University Provost Paul Courant talked
about the intellectual importance of commis-
sioning new works of art. "We are charged as
a great university to understand and change
the whole range of human thought and expe-
rience," he said. He went on to say that art is
an important part of how the University car-
ries out this duty.
But, not everyone believes the University is
living up to its artistic aspirations. Brater
expressed some displeasure with treatment of
the arts in LSA. "The College of Literature,
Science and the Arts does not always live up
to its name," in that it sometimes skimps the
arts, he said.
"We just need to have greater resources in
LSA." But he cited the strength of the cre-
ative writing department- and was quick to
add that "we have tried, we have a good
record of trying" to support the arts.
chief Wayne County homicide prosecutor and
Peters has barely set foot in a courtroom,
helped him inch to a win, he said.
As Peters did throughout the campaign,
Fisk discounted the claim that legal experi-
ence was the most important factor.
He said voters chose between two sets of
priorities.
Cox and Peters have "two very different
philosophies about where the attorney gener-
al's office should go," Fisk said.
"Mike Cox wants to move away from con-
sumer protection. Gary Peters wants to build
on it and expand it," he said.

REGENTS
Continued from Page 1A
"I know everyone woks hard to control costs, but we
need to work harder," Newman said.
Although the election resulted in the appointment of two
Republican regents to the board, Newman said this will not
impact the ability of the board to work together as a cohe-
sive group.
"The board really works together - we are not partisan
when it comes to the University," she said. "I'm sure that
will continue."
"Everything I did appeared to have paid off," Richner
said in declaring a victory that has not yet been officially
certified. He said he always knew the race would be close,
and he named campaign spending as the major reason for
his victory.
"I had the biggest bang for my buck as possible," Richn-
er said. "I think I spent (money) judiciously, in an effective
way to convey my message."
He said his success stems from his qualifications as an
attorney, a University alum and as a current state represen-
tative. Richner said he offers the experience needed to deal
with the Legislature, as well as an understanding of the
issues facing students.
"I am sympathetic to students because I wouldn't be
where I am without them," he said.
The Democratic candidates felt that, despite their loss,
they could be proud of their strong showing
"They didn't blow us out of the water and I think that
sends a message," Jumana Judeh, Ahmed's campaign man-
ager, said.
"More than a million people believed Mr. Ahmed would
be an asset to the board," she said. "We knew we had an
uphill battle going into it, but we believed we made a dif-
ference."
Judeh said Ahmed was not only very qualified, but that
he also possessed a different viewpoint much needed on
the board.
"We went into this on a platform of inclusiveness and
diversity for the University of Michigan and its board," she
said, adding that part of his platform included increasing
the cultural sensitivity of the University community.
Judeh admitted that negative press regarding Amed's pos-
sible ties to terrorist organizations played a role in his loss.
"It is unfortunate, and we are saddened by the accusa-
tion, especially because it is just not true," she said. "He is
guilty by association."'
While he will not represent the University in an official
capacity, Judeh said Ahmed plans to continue to do what
he has always done to support the University and its com-
munity.
Stephens, of Saline, was unavailable for comment
yesterday.

WWW,*dICHIGANDAILY.CO

the michigan daily

GET PAID FOR YOUR OPINIONSI
Earn $15-$125 and more per survey!
www.dollars4opinions.com
GET PAID TO PLAY. Gymboree Play and
Music is looking for energetic, creative, self-
motivated individuals to lead play and music
classes for children ages birth-4 yr. old and
their parents. Days, evenings, wknds. avail.
P/t. Call Laura at 734-214-3770.
GOLF COURSE MAINTENANCE Posi-
tions. The University of Michigan's Radrick
Farms Golf Course is seeking motivated con-*
scientious people to immediately fill mainte-
nance positions. Starting @ $7.50+ per hour
based on experience. Contact Corbin Todd at
734 998-7329 or corbint@umich.edu.
HEALTH CARE ASSISTING chiropractor
with patients, billing & typing. $8/hr. PIT flex.
994-5966.
HOLIDAY HELP WANTED! Must be able
to work during holiday break. Flex. P/T hours
Fax or email resume to
jobs@dollarbilicopying.com or
Fax: 734-930-2800.

MICHIGAN TELEFUND NOW HIRING stu-
dents for flexible night and weekend sched-
ules. Fun work atmosphere and great job ex-
perience. Earn up to $8/hr. plus nightly
bonuses. Apply online or stop by 611 Church,
Suite 4F. www.telefund.umich.edu. 998-7420.
PART TIME WORK - Local office of Vector
Marketing has several openings in customer
service/sales $14.05 base-appt. No experience
necessary, we train. Great real world/resume
experience. Flexible schedule.
Call 734-944-1223 workforstudents.com
PERSONAL TRAINER WANTED for pri-
vate fitness ctr., certification and/or degree in
related field is req. Individual must be highly
motivated & willing to work on expanding
their own clientele. Opportunity for advance-
ment & unlimited income, 734-477-9430.
REAL LIFE LIVING SERVICES is accept-
ing applications for Direct Support Staff work-
ing with people with disabilities. Great for
people w/experience in OT, PT, ST, Psych,
Social Work, Nursing, Human Services! $8-
$9/hr. Applicants must be 18 yrs. of age, pos-
sess valid unrestricted drivers license and have
a H.S. diploma/GED. (734)222-6076. EOE.
RESEARCH/ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT - Dynamic safety consulting firm
(www.appliedsafety.com) w/ national clientele
seeks indiv. to provide general project support.
Must have good writing and organizational
skills. Library experience, interest in law pre-
ferred. BA/BS or some college req. Submit re-
sume via fax - 734-994-9494, attn. K. Damell.
SCOREKEEPERS IS NOW HIRING Cooks,
Floormen and waitstaff for immediate open-
ings. Bring your class schedule and apply to-
day at 310 Maynard A2 - Across from Borders
Books Downtown. 995-0100.

BABYSITTER NEEDED FOR 6 & 4 YR.
old, 18 months, & newborn. Tues. noon-
5p.m., Thurs. 9:30-5:30 (any or part of this
time), & some weekends. Salary neg. Experi-
ence, references & transportation necessary.
Near Campus. Please call 734-332-7921.
EXPERIENCED MOTHER'S HELPERS
avail. Flexible schedules, reasonable rates.
Call Wise Hands 662-9325 or 662-3363
12-5pm Mon.-Fri.
FAMILY SEEKS RELIABLE, fun nanny for
2 girls (infant & 3) in our Canton home.
Mon.-Fri., 7:30am-4pm. 734-354-8826.

R-

CAA4CML ACAPLL0# JAIMICA
BAHAMAS R.OMIUA
SELL TRIPS,
EARN CASH, GO FREE!!
CALL TODAY FOR DETAILS!
CONTACT
STATRAVEL
MICHIGAN UNION
GROUND FLOOR SRV"CES
734.769.2555 800.648.4849
***SPRING BREAK BLOWOUT***
LOWEST PRICES & FREE TRIPS
FREE MEALS AND PARTIES BY Nov 6th
15 YRS EXP. Sunsplashtours.com
1-800426-7710.
*AT LASTI SPRING BREAK IS NEARI*
Book before Nov. 6th
FREE MEALS, PARTIES & DRINKS
2 FREE TRIPS LOWEST PRICE
SUNSPLASHTOURS.COM 1-800-426-7710
2 FOOTBALL TICKETS wanted. Michigan
v. Ohio State game. Top price paid. Call 908-
238-0012 & leave phone # if no answer.
ACAPULCO-BIANCHI-ROSSI TOURS -
SPRING BREAKI! The only company ex-
clusive to Acapulco! That's why we're the

EARLY SPRNG BREAK SPECiALS! Cancun
& Jamaica from $429! Free Breakfast, Din-
ners & Drinks! Award Winning Company!
Group Leaders Free! Florida Vacations from
$149! springbreaktravel.com 1-800678-6386.
SPRING BREAK '03 with StudentCity.com!
The ultimate vacation in Cancun, Bahamas,
Mazatlan, Acapulco, Jamaica and more! Pack-
ages include airfare, 7 nights hotel, FREE
FOOD, FREE DRINKS and 150% Lowest
Price Guarantee! REPS WANTED! Organize
15 friends and get hooked up with 2 FREE
TRIPS and VIP treatment! Also earn extra
cash and bonus prizes just for promoting Stu-
dentCity.com! Call 1-800-293-1445 or e-mail
sales@studentcty.com today!

FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED for bi-
level apt on Church St. & S. Univ.769-6478.

WANTED! SPRING BREAKERS! Sun
Coast Vacations wants to send you on Spring
Break 2003 to Cancun, Acapulco, Mazatlan,
Jamaica or the Bahamas for FREE! Call us
now at 1-800-7954786 or email us at
sales@suncoastvacations.com!

Af

#1 SPRING BREAK VACATIONS! Cancun, Ja-
maica, Acapulco, Bahamas, Mazatlan, Florida,
S. Padre. 110% Best Prices! Book Now &
get Free Parties & Meals! Group Discounts.
Now Hiring Campus Reps! 1-800-234-7007.
endlesssummertours.com.
***ACT NOW! GUARANTEE the best
spring break prices! South Padre, Cancun, Ja-
maica, Bahamas, Acapulco, Florida & Mardi
Gras. TRAVEL FREE, Reps Needed,
EARN$$$. Group Discounts for 6+. 1-888-
THINK-SUN (1-888-844-6578 dept 2626) /
\avenrnnhrcinlkr igmi ntc nmera

B1EAK
PANAMA EAC/i fi
SV ~PRt iICES:
Beacon
RkCAC04 RSRT

EAST INDIAN EGG DONER NEEDED
$50,000 compensation
Highly successful, professional East Indian
couple, need an egg donor of East Indian de-
scent, who is attractive and intelligent. (SAT
1400+) with a good personality. Privacy is
guaranteed. Please contact our agent:
Darlene@perfectmatch.com
www.perfectniatch.com
800-264-8828
SPECIAL GIFT- We're looking for healthy
women between the ages 21-25 for egg dona-
tion. All ethnic backgrounds are encour- aged.
Fee paid. Send inquiries to AARMA, P.O.
Box 2674, Ann Arbor, MI48106.

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan