100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 06, 2002 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2002-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, November 6, 2002 - 7

GOVERNOR
Continued from Page 1
In her favor was voter disenchantment with the poli-
cies of Republican Gov. John Engler and a heavy
Democratic enthusiasm over controlling the governor's
office for the first time in 12 years and only the second
time in 40.
Following the primaries, the campaign took a
sharp turn to the negative, with Granholm accusing
her opponent of wanting to privatize the Blue
Cross/Blue Shield health care plan and tying him to
the Engler administration, which she said "blew" a
$1.2 billion surplus.
Republicans chided Granholm for her tenure as cor-
poration counsel to Wayne County Executive Edward
McNamara, accusing her of approving numerous no-
bid contracts for work at Detroit Metropolitan Airport,
which at the time was fully under the jurisdiction of the
county executive.
Her opponents said the attorney general could not
be trusted when, during an October debate, she said
she did not "want" to raise taxes. Nevertheless,
Granholm promised a general change in state poli-
cies, ending the "divisive politics of the past" - a
reference to the Republican campaign, and a general
acceptance that it was time Michigan elected a
woman as governor.
"Never relinquish the high ground we claimed and
you held so well," Granholm told supporters at the
Democratic victory party, at the Renaissance Center
Mariott Hotel in Detroit.
Former Gov. James Blanchard, Engler's prede-
cessor, echoed many last night when he said the
toughest problem the new governor will face will

be the state's budget deficit, estimated to be over
$1 billion over the next few years. During her
campaign Granholm said she would cut all state
departments' budgets by 5 percent.
"She'll have to clean up this huge financial mess. It's
been brewing for years," Blanchard said, putting the
blame squarely on Engler.
Blanchard, who was governor from 1983 to 1990,
advised Granholm to "conduct a thorough, outside,
independent audit of the state's books" one of his
promises when he sought the office again this year,
pulling third to Granholm and U.S. Rep. David Bonior
in the Democratic primary.
Granholm, a relative newcomer to state politics, won
her first race for office in 1998, when she narrowly
defeated her Republican opponent for attorney general
and thereby avoided a GOP sweep of the state's execu-
tive offices, with Engler and Republican Secretary of
State Candice Miller overwhelmingly winning reelec-
tion to their respective offices.
Her defeated opponent was first elected to the state
Senate in 1982 and rose.to the post of majority leader
following Engler's 1990 election. He was the longest
serving governor.and became a fixture in Republican
but was unable to capture the voters Engler had in his
three elections.
"We finally have a situation where we can change
the politics of the past," Kilpatrick said.
Posthumus said Granholm co-opted many of his
stances - especially his philosophy on taxes - into
her platform, ensuring they will continue.
Despite the loss, he emphasized his service in
Engler's administration. He said the departing
governor guided the state well and thanked him
for his leadership.

Addressing the man he had hoped to succeed, he
said, "Your legacy will live on for many years, and I'm
proud to have been part of that legacy."
Granholm was the most formidable candidate the
Democrats have fielded in decades, Posthumus said.
He added two major barriers that stood in his way
were voters' desire for change and for a female gover-
nor. "I probably could have overcome one of them, but
both of them made it hard."
Despite waging a campaign that included television
ads accusing Granholm of practicing corrupt politics,
he said he does not regret his strategy.
"I still hold that corruption, whether it's black or
white, still has to be stopped," he said.
Posthumus nonetheless adopted a mostly conciliato-
ry tone in speaking of his opponent. He wished the
new governor luck in navigating Michigan's budget
through hard times.
He said he has not yet made a decision about what
his future holds. He would predict no further than the
next few weeks, when he will spend time with his fam-
ily and on a deer-hunting excursion.
The Northville resident's election also means
that Democrats will hold the lieutenant gover-
nor's office, which is chosen jointly as the the
vote for governor. Granholm's running mate was
John Cherry Jr. of Clio, who is, currently the
minority leader in the state Senate. That victory
and the possibility that Democrats tied Republi-
cans in the race for seats in the Senate means
that Cherry, as its presiding officer, would cast
the tie-breaking vote when senators organize the
chamber next year.
Posthumus' defeated running mate was state Sen.
Loren Bennett of Canton Township.

r x.
BRENDAN O'DONNELL/Daily
Lt. Gov. Dick Posthumus, the Republican gubernatorial candidate, delivers his
concession speech yesterday at his reception in Lansing.

LEVIN
Continued from Page 1
said. "Part of that though is that we have to help out all of the
unemployed who have exhausted their benefits."
Other issues Levin said he will work on are creating a pre-
scription drug benefit program, strengthening public schools
and protecting the environment.
Despite last night's defeat, Raczkowski told supporters to
remain optimistic about their government after he conceded to
Levin. Maintaining an upbeat attitude, Raczkowski said people
must put aside party differences in an effort to ptoduce
changes. "Now we've got to get
behind (Levin) and make sure he lis-
tens to the issues we raised in this EC IiI ,
campaign," Raczkowski said. He also U.S. Senate
commended Levin for running adver- race
tisements that reflected many of his ( f a
key campaign issues. arl Levin
"Talking to Sen. Levin, I think
one way or another, we'll be work-
ing closely together in the next six 107,3
years," Raczkowski said. Refusing
to fully accept defeat, Raczkowski
used the "Rocky" movie series as an ndrew
analogy for his situation. "If I'm not
mistaken, he lost in that movie. But
remember what came next," he told Raczkowski
a crowd of supporters. "It's not over.
... We have the right issues." 638,432
While he acknowledged that he
encountered obstacles on the cam-
paign trail, he said he tried to make.
the best of the situation. At times
even friends tried to deter him from
running, but Raczkowski's child-
hood upbringing and his parents'
experiences as immigrants helped in Levin
upholding his dedication to the cam-
paign. "I've learned a lot from my
parents who have gone through a lot of adversity,"
Raczkowski said. "They taught me to go on, to be persistent,
to be determined."
Now that he will not spending the next six years in the Sen-
ate, Raczkowski is making alternative plans. "This loss allows
for rebuilding time," Raczkowski said. "We'll go step by step."
Still, he added he will dedicate time to rebuilding Detroit and
other floundering Michigan communities. The two candidates
ran relatively low-key campaigns, although for different rea-
sons. Raczkowski could not afford to run a television ad after
Republicans decided to provide him with no funding. Levin,
chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, concen-
trated much of his time on drafting resolutions on military
action in Iraq and had only limited time to campaign.

PROPOSAL 4
Continued from Page 1
Gov.-elect Jennifer Granholm, cur-
rent Lt. Gov. Dick Posthumus and
Gov. John Engler. Anti-Proposal 4
committee People Protecting Kids
and the Constitution and other
opponents have spent $4.5 million
on educating voters.
But supporters such as the Michi-
gan Health and Hospital Associa-
tion spent twice as much.
"We seriously believe we won the
debate, but people didn't like the
solution we proposed," said Roger
Martin, spokesman for the coalition
supporting Proposal 4. "Govern-
ment has to step forward and pay its
fair share for health care."
Until recently, polls showed in
favor of the proposal passing.
"The recent turnover in polls in
the past four or five weeks that has
gradually caught up and now sur-
passed has a lot of do with grass-
roots efforts," Hratchian said. "It
SENATE
Continued from Page 1
featured incumbents running
against other incumbents - the
result of a redistricting to reflect
population changes.
Rep. Nancy Johnson (R-Conn.)
defeated Rep. Jim Maloney (D-Conn.)
and Rep. Charles Pickering (R-Miss.)
defeated Rep. Ronnie Shows (D-
Miss.). Rep. John Shimkus (R-Ill.)
defeated Rep. David Phelps (D-Ill.) in
a downstate district. But a Republican
incumbent was trailing the Democrat-
ic incumbent in a see-saw vote count
in the other such race in Pennsylvania.
In another closely followed race,
GOP businessman Chris Chocola
won an open northern Indiana
House seat that had been Democrat-
ic. In a Gulf Coast Florida race,
Democratic Rep. Karen Thurmond
was ousted by Republican Ginny
Brown-Waite.
However, Democrats took formerly

just took time."
University President Mary Sue
Coleman stressed the importance of
informing students about the pro-
posal at a recent Michigan Student
Assembly meeting.
MSA passed a resolution in sup-
port of keeping the tobacco money
in the Michigan Merit Award Pro-
gram and held a tailgate party to
educate students on the importance
of the proposal.
"I am happy the proposal didn't
pass. We hope the tailgate and the
resolution enabled students to make
an informed decision," MSA presi-
dent Sarah Boot said.
Engler announced in 1999 that he
wanted to use some of the tobacco
settlement money to pay for the
Michigan Merit Scholarship
Awards, when major tobacco com-
panies agreed to end lawsuits by
compensating on smoking-relating
health care expenses, of which
Michigan will reap an estimate of
$8.5 billion through 2025.
Republican seats in Tennessee and
Maryland. In a Tennessee House seat
vacated by Republican Van Hilleary to
run for governor, Democratic State
Sen. Lincoln Davis defeated Janice
Bowling.
In the Maryland suburbs of
Washington, eight-term moderate
Republican Rep. Constance Morella
lost to State Sen. Chris Van Hollen
in the nation's second most expen-
sive race with $7 million in spend-
ing. In Baltimore, Democrat Dutch
Ruppersberger defeated former
GOP Rep. Helen Bentley for a
vacant Republican seat.
On New York's Long Island,
Republican incumbent Felix Grucci
was on the verge of defeat.
In a hard-fought battle for a new
seat in eastern Georgia, Republican
Max Burns, a college professor,
defeated Democrat Charles
"Champ" Walker. Democrats were
leading for two other new Georgia
seats.

Gone voting

F-HANK PAYNE/Daily
The Michigan Union was one of several on-campus locations where students were
able to cast their votes yesterday.

the michigan daily

HOLIDAY HELP WANTED! Must be able
to work during holiday break. Flex. P/T hours
Fax or email resume to
jobs@dollarbillcopying.com or
Fax: 734-930-2800.
MAIL BOXES ETC - Looking for Reliable
help! Flexible Hours: Call NOW!!
734-622-8000.
MALE PERSONAL ASSISTANT needed
for teenager w/ autism. $1.0.75/hr. 426-8556.
MICHIGAN TELEFUND NOW HIRING stu-
dents for flexible night and weekend sched-
ules. Fun work atmosphere and great job ex-
perience. Earn up to $8/hr. plus nightly
bonuses. Apply online or stop by 611 Church,
Suite 4F. www.telefund.umich.edu. 998-7420.
PART TIME WORK - Local office of Vector
Marketing has several openings in customer
service/sales $14.05 base-appt. No experience
necessary, we train. Great real world/resume
experience. Flexible schedule.
Call 734-944-1223 workforstudents.com

REAL LIFE LIVING SERVICES is accept-
ing applications for Direct Support Staff work-
ing with people with disabilities. Great for
people w/experience in OT, PT, ST, Psych,
Social Work, Nursing, Human Services! $8-
$9/hr. Applicants must be 18 yrs. of age, pos-
sess valid unrestricted drivers license and have
a H.S. diploma/GED. (734)222-6076. EOE.
RESEARCH/ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT - Dynamic safety consulting firm
(www.appliedsafety.com) w/ national clientele
seeks mdiv. to provide general project support.
Must have good writing and organizational
skills. Library experience, interest in law pre-
ferred. BA/BS or some college req. Submit re-
sume via fax - 734-994-9494, attn. K. Darnell.
RETAIL/ CUSTOMER SERVICE help
needed. P/T. UPS or Fed Ex experience
helpful. Apply in person @ Pack & Mail Plus.
1315 E. Michigan Ave., Saline. Pay DOE.
SCOREKEEPERS IS NOW HIRING Cooks,
Floormen and waitstaff for immediate open-
ings. Bring your class schedule and apply to-
day at 310 Maynard A2 - Across from Borders
Books Downtown. 995-0100.
SERVERS NEEDED - Evenings & week-
ends. Apply within! Cracker Barrel 7925 Con-
ference Center Dr. Brighton MI 48116 or Call
810-220-4977.
WANTED 29 SERIOUS PEOPLE to work at
home. $1500-7500 PT/FT. Call 1-888-522-
5293, or check out www.dshomebus.com
chl c r
095

#1 SPRING BREAK VACATIONS! Cancun, Ja-
maica, Acapulco, Bahamas, Mazatlan, Florida,
S. Padre. 110% Best Prices! Book Now &
get Free Parties & Meals! Group Discounts.
Now Hiring Campus Reps! 1-800-234-7007.
endlesssummertours.com.
***ACT NOW! GUARANTEE the best
spring break prices! South Padre, Cancun, Ja-
maica, Bahamas, Acapulco, Florida & Mardi
Gras. TRAVEL FREE, Reps Needed,
EARN$$$. Group Discounts for6+. 1-888-
THINK-SUN (1-888-844-6578 dept 2626) /
www.springbreakdiscounts.com.
***SPRING BREAK BLOWOUT***
LOWEST PRICES & FREE TRIPS
FREE MEALS AND PARTIES BY Nov 6th
15 YRS EXP. Sunsplashtours.com
1-800-426-7710.
*AT LAST!! SPRING BREAK IS NEAR!*
Book before Nov. 6th
FREE MEALS, PARTIES & DRINKS
2 FREE TRIPS LOWEST PRICE
SUNSPLASHTOURS.COM 1-800-426-7710
CACM * ACAPULCO JAMAICA
1A{AMAS # FLOBI)A
AIr&

2 FOOTBALL TICKETS wanted. Michigan
v. Ohio State game. Top price paid. Call 908-
238-0012 & leave phone # if no answer.
ACAPULCO-BIANCHI-ROSSI TOURS -
SPRING BREAK!! The only company ex-
clusive to Acapulco! That's why we're the
BEST. "Go Loco In Acapulco" with the #1
Spring Break Company in Acapulco for 16
years! Call 800-875-4525. www.bianchi-
rossi.com Be a Rep, travel FREE - ask how!
BEFORE YOU SPRING BREAK, E-BREAK!
The on-line authority for Spring Break 2003!
Visit www.ebreaknow.com for all of your
Spring Break needs!
EARLY SPECIALS! Spring Break Ba-
hamas Party Cruise! 5 Days $299! Includes
Meals, Parties, Awesome Beaches, Nightlife!
Departs from Florida! Get Group - Go Free!!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386.
EARLY SPRING BREAK SPECIALS! Cancun
& Jamaica from $429! Free Breakfast, Din-
ners & Drinks! Award Winning Company!
Group Leaders Free! Florida Vacations from
$149! springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-6386.
SPRING BREAK '03 with StudentCity.com!
The ultimate vacation in Cancun, Bahamas,
Mazatlan, Acapulco, Jamaica and more! Pack-
ages include airfare, 7 nights hotel, FREE
FOOD, FREE DRINKS and 150% Lowest
Price Guarantee! REPS WANTED! Organize
15 friends and get .hooked up with 2 FREE
TRIPS and VIP treatment! Also earn extra
cash and bonus prizes just for promoting Stu-
dentCity.com! Call 1-800-293-1445 or e-mail
sales@studentcitycom today!

~1P1PRN6-
PANAMA BEACHt Fi
'SPR-LOW PRICE&S
Sandpiper
Beacon
MEcc ESo~r
The 'itlm Place:
WoftdFa'ouA TNK gP.
tone of the World's Large
S Longest Keg Pantg;
USA SPRING BREAK
, Presents
Spring Break 2003

FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED for bi-
level apt. on Church St. & S. Univ. 769-6478.

EAST INDIAN EGG DONER NEEDED
$50,000 connsadon
Highly successful, professional East Indian
couple, need an egg donor of East Indian de-
scent, who is attractive and intelligent. (SAT
1400+) with a good personality. Privacy is
guaranteed. Please contact our agent:
Darlene@perfectmatch.com
www.perfectmatch.com
800-264-8828
SPECIAL GIFT- We're looking for healthy
women betvween the ages 21-25 for egg dona-
tion. All ethnic backgrounds are encour- aged.
Fee paid. Send inquiries to AARMA, P.O.
Box 2674, Ann Arbor, MI48106.

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan