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October 30, 2002 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 30, 2002 - 7

HOUSING
Continued from Page 1
dent will sign that they are held accountable for," Off-Campus
Housing Advisor Melissa Goldstein said.
University Housing is recognizing that students are signing
their leases earlier. This year's housing fair was held on Oct.
21 as opposed to the Nov.5 date a year earlier.
"Education is one of the biggest parts of the fair. We try to
get more students to make more informed decisions and give
them questions they need to ask and tell them where they need
to go,"Goldstein said.
The pressure from landlords to sign and students' willing-
ness to commit has created a situation in which leases are get-
ting signed earlier and earlier.
"There are different parts to the equation. Landlords are
worried and students are worried. Signing a lease early also
protects landlords,"Goldstein said.
Not all landlords pressure students to sign early leases.
Perry Koulouras owns two houses in Ann Arbor and he said
he does not pressure students to sign their leases. His wife said
he "likes to give everyone time to evolve," and he "likes to
give young people the benefit of the doubt."Koulouras has not
had any litigation problems in the many years he has leased
his houses.
Students are encouraged to go to the University
Housing Office in the Student Activities Building for
any questions they may have about off-campus hous-
ing. The Housing website is also a good resource to
start the apartment hunt because it offers useful tips for
apartment searching, officials said.
According to the University Housing's website recommen-
dations, students should not begin looking for an apartment
until the housing fair has passed. One pitfall of early lease
signing is making a commitment to roommates that you may
hardly know, especially their living habits, ability to pay rent
on time and expectations about shared housing. This can lead
to disagreements, disrupted study time and attempts to get out
of the rental lease.
Also, students should check the lease to see if snow and leaf
removal are provided by the landlord. Another tip the web-
site gives is to think again before squeezing in another
roommate. Many students have been stuck with finding
a new place to live when the City of Ann Arbor per-
forms routine inspections and finds more people living
in an apartment than capacity allows.
"There's enough housing for everybody, so don't rush
into something as important as where you live and who
you live with. Take your time and consider your options,"
Goldstein said.
"Ask questions - ask the landlord, ask your friends, and if
you don't get a question answered, ask in a different way."

HIGHER ED
Continued from Page 1
es that would be willing to provide support,"
he said. "Education in many respects is eco-
nomic development.
"(Granholm) has a number of organizations
that have expressed an interest in helping
out."
If elected governor, Posthumus favors con-
tinuing the Michigan Education Savings Pro-
gram, a tax-exempt savings account that he
implemented to help parents save for their
children's college education.
"I like to call the MESP a 401-K for col-
lege savings," Posthumus said. "The matching
funds are another great tool in helping Michi-
gan's working families to afford future col-
lege costs."
Rated by Money Magazine as one of the

best state-sponsored college savings pro-
grams in the country, the MESP also offers a
state-matching contribution of up to $200 for
eligible families.
Another area in which Granholm and
Posthumus hold different plans involves the
future of the Michigan Educational Assess-
ment Program, which provided more than
50,000 students with grant funding last year.
While Posthumus favors the current status
of the MEAP, Granholm would like to
increase the number of factors taken into
account when awarding the $2,500 grant.
"We want to be looking at things other than
just a score when rating an individual or a
school, such as attendance," De Witt said.
"Certainly there are many upper-income fam-
ilies where the benefits of $2500 is different
when compared to the benefit of families that
make $40,000 dollars."

ECONOMY
Continued from Page 1
market does."
On Wall Street, investors initially
reacted negatively to the survey
news, but a late afternoon recovery
kept market indexes relatively
unchanged for the day.
The surveys have received
increased attention in recent months
as economists and market analysts
look for signs that the economy is
sustaining growth.
Consumer sentiment is widely
considered to be a harbinger of con-
sumer spending, which accounts for
about two-thirds of all economic
activity.
The current fear by analysts is
that continual decreases in senti-
ment and spending may push the
economy back into a recession.
"If consumer spending slows,
(the economy) is going to be in big
trouble," Sloan said. "I think this is
going to be even worse than last
year. This may be enough to send us
into the double-dip (recession)."
Curtin noted that it is important
to see growth in business invest-
ment while consumer sentiment is

waning.
"I think that's what pushed us ini-
tially into a recession," he said. "If
we don't see a rebound ... that
leaves the economy in a very weak-
ened state."
This does not bode well for the
upcoming holiday shopping season,
traditionally the biggest time of the
year for retailers.
Ed Davidson, owner of Bivouac
on South State Street, noted that
sales have not met expectations in
recent months due to a number of
factors, including a weakened econ-
omy.
Davidson said warm weather in
September, coupled with decreased
traveling to Europe, has also kept
sales down. He is betting on a cold"'
Michigan winter to keep shoppers..
coming into his store.
"If the weather is cold, I will be
able to overcome the economy,"
Davidson said.
The University's monthly survey
findings are based on about 500
telephone interviews with Ameri-
cans across the country.
The Conference Board's survey is
based on a survey sample of 5,000
individuals.

LAWSU IT
Continued from Page 1
would provide more guidance to us and uni-
versities around the country," he added.
Alger said the potential benefits resulting
from a Supreme Court ruling in the Universi-
ty's favor still fail to compare to the impact a
decision against the University might have.
"It would be devastating if the Supreme
Court were to reverse Bakke, but we don't
expect that to happen," he said.
"Right now we're in the circumstance where
we've won," President Mary Sue Coleman said
THEFTS
Continued from Page 1
Several students living in Wisdom's hall
said Housing officials requested that they not
comment on the alleged thefts dune to the
ongoing investigation.
Greg Merritt, the assistant director of resi-
dence education for University Housing, said
that while he could not comment on specific
cases, students who break the Community
Living at Michigan rules and regulations can
be removed from University Housing in cer-
tain cases.
"Emergency action would be taken where their

in an interview earlier this month. She said she
believes in the educational value of a diverse
student body and firmly supports the Universi-
ty's defense of its admissions policies.
"I think what we do is legal and is fair,"
Coleman said.
Krislov said a Supreme Court conference
date has been set for Nov. 22, but there is no
guarantee whether a decision will be made
within the next month.
He said the University is confident the
Supreme Court will decide by the end of this
year whether it will hear one, both or neither
of the University's cases.
continued presence in residence hall causes
imminent danger to persons or property," Merritt
said.
"It's not a frequent response."
Whether there is imminent danger involved
is determined by University Housing and the
Office of Student Conflict Resolution, he
added.
According to the Community Living at
Michigan handbook, if emergency removal is
imposed on a student, he or she is entitled to
formal arbitration.
They are not allowed to return to the build-
ing they were vacated from until the arbitra-
tion process is complete.

North Korea has
no plans to halt

.y

nuclear program..

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KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia
(AP) - Blaming the United States
for pushing it into a corner, North
Korea rejected demands it give up
its nuclear weapons program during
an acrimonious opening round of
talks yesterday with Japan on estab-
lishing diplomatic ties, Japanese
officials said.
The talks were the first the coun-
tries have held in two years on
establishing ties, and hopes were
high North Korea would offer some
sort of concession on the nuclear
issue and growing outrage in Japan
over the kidnapping of its citizens
in the 1970s and '80s.
But along with ignoring calls to
halt its nuclear weapons develop-
ment, the North strongly rebuffed
Japan on the abduction issue,
heightening an already emotional
tug-of-war between the Asian
neighbors.
"Not much progress," Japanese
delegation chief Katsunari Suzuki
said as he returned from the talks.
Still, officials said talks would
continue as scheduled yesterday.
In Washington, Secretary of State
Colin Powell warned that North
Korea faces a grim economic future
unless it complies with growing
international demands to surrender
the nuclear program.
"No North Korean child can eat
enriched uranium," Powell told a
news conference. "It is fool's gold
for North Korea."
Since the North acknowledged its
nuclear arms program this month,
Japan has insisted scrapping it was
a precondition for normalization
between the longtime rivals.
The North "completely denied"
Do you H a
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calls for the country to give up its N
nuclear weapons program, a senior Z
Japanese delegation official said.
The North blamed concerns over its
nuclear weapons program on the
United States, saying the hard-line
U.S. stance against it was the "root of
the problem," said the official, speak-
ing on condition of anonymity.
North Korea has long justified
efforts to bolster its military by
claiming the presence of tens of
thousands of U.S. troops in Japan
and South Korea is a threat against
which it must be able to defend -
itself.
"Japan wants to focus on the
abduction and security issues," said
Pak Ryong Yeon, the North Korean Z
delegation's No. 2 official. "But our
thinking is, that if we work toward K
diplomatic ties, then the security
issues will be solved along the way."
North Korea acknowledged the
secret nuclear weapons program to
a visiting senior U.S. official this
month.
For Japan, the news was especial-
ly frightening because Pyongyang
has demonstrated that it can fire
missiles well beyond Japan's main
islands.
And with nearly 50,000 U.S.
troops stationed in Japan, it would
likely be a primary target should
war break out.
At a summit on the sidelines of
the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooper-
ation meetings in Mexico over the
weekend, Prime Minister Junichiro
Koizumi joined President Bush and
South Korean President Kim Dae-
jung in demanding Pyongyang end
its nuclear program in a "verifiable
way."
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