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October 28, 2002 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, October 28, 2002 - 7A
Chili, spirit gear fans up for Homecoming game

By Whitney Meredith
For the Daily
Despite the drizzly weather and soggy grass,
many gathered Saturday morning at the pre-
game Homecoming Pep Rally featuring music,
food and sprit-evoking speeches.
Business School junior Niraj Patel said that
the pep rally got him "pumped up to see foot-
ball and excited to be a Michigan Wolverine."
"I want homecoming to be a big effect on
the school spirit," said Kristen Sarri, an LSA
servit
SMUDBOWL SeFor
Continued from Page 1A of SA
one of its two touchdowns. mud
"The game is sloppy to say the the gE
least, but it is all in good fun. It's a lit- week
tle rough out here, but it's a once-in-a- the f
lifetime chance," said Nate Hall, game
Sigma Nu brother and LSA junior. ment
Although interchapter rivalries field.
spiced up the competition, the higher All
purpose of the Mudbowl didn't escape ers to
Bryan or his teammates. shins
"We have no second agenda," he mud
said. "This is all going to charity." prouc
Bryan also felt that service events like shirts
the Mudbowl give fraternities a and w
chance to fend off negative stereo- althot
types about the Greek system as a the fo
whole. In
"What people don't know is that broke
every fraternity and sorority has char- frater
itable events every year. Hopefully throw
things like this can dispel some of the other
bad perceptions about the Greek com- allow
munity." "TI
Bryan referred to SAE's quota ditio
requiring all brothers to contribute to defen
community service events. He esti- one I
mated this year's quota to be around year,"
3,000 hours for the chapter. However, an SA
he said community service is a hall- back
mark of Greek life. "Community two t
took
GRANHOLM, legisl
Continued from Page 1A GOP
attorney general, is the only Democ- House
rat in the executive branch of state defect
government. 2001,
"In 2052, what will your grandchil- in tha
dren look back and see you have "TI
done?" Granholm asked the crowd of Gran
mostly students. "There's thousands of what
pages of history waiting to be written said
and you have the pen." who
Granholm's speech was aimed main- new
ly at pumping up her supporters, And
though she did briefly touch on stu- who
dents' issues. prima
"My husband and I had to pay $496 said,'
a month for 20 years to pay off our stu- omy,
dent loans," she said. "Students tax cu
shouldn't have to mortgage their No
futures to pay for college." howe'
About 400 to 500 supporters turned "(
up for the event. Among them was concr
LSA freshman David Kelley, who is so schoo
far undecided in the race but said he vate s
usually votes Democratic. kids t
"I support her positions on the Bohl,
issues and I think it's time for a Univ
change," Kelley said. "We've had Posth
Republicans for 12 years." propo
Many of the speakers at the event raisin

senior and co-director of the Student Alumni
Council, which organized the event.
She said the Student Alumni Council has
been in charge of the pep rally for the last three
years, and planning for this year started at the
conclusion of Homecoming last year. During
this planning, the Council made continuous
adjustments to what was implicated.
One major change this year was timing. Tra-
ditionally the pep rally is held the Friday
evening before the homecoming game on the
Diag. But it was moved to Saturday on Elbel

Field before the game in hopes of increasing
attendance.
But one council member said he was disap-
pointed with the lower than expected atten-
dance. "I'm a little disappointed with the
school spirit."
In hopes of invoking school spirit, the pep
rally featured performances by the Women's
Cheer Club, the Rhythm Tap Ensemble, Super-
fans as well as the annual Gamma Phi Beta
Chili Cook-off.
"It's neat to have shows of student groups,

and to see what different organizations do,"
Engineering junior Carolyn Wineland said.
A number of fraternities and sororities par-
ticipated in the Gamma Phi Beta Chili Cook-
off. In a change from previous years, it was
opened to non-Greek organizations as well.
There was a $50 registration fee and only
nachos and bread were provided. Each organi-
zation gathered their own ingredients and pre-
pared the chili from their own recipe.
"I like how you get to sample different chilis
from every house. It's a good variety," LSA

senior Traci Buchalskik stated.
All profits traditionally go to charity, and this
year's benefited Campfire U.S.A., an organiza-
tion that gives the opportunity for underprivi-
leged children to go to camp.
Melissa Orban, an LSA senior and head of
Gamma Phi Beta's Chili Cook-off planning
committee, said that they expected to make
around $1,000.
"We're having fun and helping kids at the
same time," said LSA junior Nick Ferreira, a
member of Lambda Chi Alpha.
ed it the next day.
Authorities say a hole had been cut in the trunk from
rich someone could have fired on unsuspecting vic-
1s. Muhammad got the car's title and registration on
one-year anniversary of the terrorist attacks on New
wk and Washington, said Edmond Bonnette, the agent
charge of the Camden, N.J., motor vehicle office.

ce needs to be done," he added.
r the mudbowl, a large portion
kE's lawn are turned into a huge
pit each year. In preparation for
ame, the field is soaked for two
s. Pledges dig and comb over
ield, and then just before the
, the Ann Arbor Fire Depart-
completely waters down the
this hard work allows the play-
play in mud half way up their
. Every player gets covered in
from head to toes. They each
idly donned their fraternity T-
, duct-taped around the sleeves
waist for security. All wore cleats
ugh they really had no effect in
ot-deep mud.
the spirit of the game, two fights
out on the sidelines between the
rnities. Punches and mud were
vn by the opposing teams until
brothers could break it up to
the game to go on.
his is the (University's) best tra-
tn. Even ESPN came out. The
se shut out Sigma Nu except for
ong run. We'll be back next
said LSA junior Jeff Kroeger,
AE brother. Kroeger, a running
for SAE, also scored one of the
ouchdowns for SAE.
the time to blast Republicans for
ation initiated in Congress. The
still holds a majority in the
e, but after Sen. James Jeffords'
tion to become an independent in
the Republicans lost the majority
t chamber.
'hey tried to cut back on Pell
ts and student loans - that's
the Republicans have done,"
Rep. John Dingell of Dearborn,
is running for re-election in the
15th Congressional District.
Rep. Lynn Rivers of Ann Arbor,
lost to Dingell in the August 6.
ary for the 15th District seat,
"As a way to speed up the econ-
we don't automatically think
uts."
t all attendees were Democrats,
ver.
Granholm) doesn't have much
rete policy and, as far as public
ls go, she sends her kids to pri-
chool. Dick Posthumus sends his
o public school," said senior Alex
, co-chair of Eastern Michigan
ersity's chapter of Students for
umus. "I don't know how she can
se all this new spending without
g taxes."

SNIPER
Continued from Page 1A
Saturday's arrest came as Maryland prosecutors filed
the first murder charges against Muhammad and
teenager John Lee Malvo in the 13 sniper attacks that
had terrorized the Washington area. Prosecutors in Vir-

ginia said Saturday they also would file murder charges
against the two suspects.
Osbourne was believed to have helped Muhammad
buy the blue 1990 Chevrolet Caprice in which Muham-
mad and Malvo were arrested. The car.was purchased
for $250 from Sure Shot Auto Sales Inc. in Trenton,
N.J., on Sept. 10, and Muhammad and Osbourne regis-

ENGINEERS
Continued from Page 1A
tensegrity - where metals push out-
ward and are held by cables.
Stephen Director, Engineering
Dean, commented on the location and
design of Indexer II and praised the
efforts of Class of 1950 donors for
bringing the sculpture to the Universi-
ty community.
"Indexer II is so well designed and
appropriately placed," Director said.
"This would not have been possible
without the support of the alumni
donors."
Administrators, class of 1950 alums
and family, faculty and students gath-
ered to witness the dedication and
hear Snelson speak about the concepts
behind many of his sculptures that can
be seen around the world.
Dean of the School of Art and
Design, Bryan Rogers, introduced
Snelson in a lecture following the ded-
ication, by describing the process of
inspecting nature in both art and sci-
ence.
"Sculptors starting with their vener-
able chiseling away and humps of
stone and often trying to immortalize
an image along the way expanded the
chiseling tradition and joined in exam-
ining the legal framework of nature,
not unlike what scientists and engi-

neers do," Rogers said.
Through a series of slides, Snel-
son presented his major works and
the development of the principle
tensegrity.
"I have been interested in the nature
of structure over these many years,"
Snelson said. "By stacking weights, I
realized they could successfully sup-
port everything above and it would
move like a spinal column. You could
support two solid members with sim-
ply tension members."
By analyzing the structural theories
behind his sculptures, Snelson showed
the importance of engineering and sci-
ence in sculpture.
The Indexer II, which was created
in 2001, adds to the collection of
sculptures on North Campus and
shows the combination of three disci-
plines - art, architecture and engi-
neering - present on North Campus.
The class of 1931 also gave back to
campus, awarding 20 scholarships to
current Engineering students.
The scholarship program began in
1978 and now contains approximately
$3 million. After an applicant receives
a scholarship, which comes in the
amount of $8,000, it is renewed for the
rest of their college career, given that
they continue to take a full course load
and keep their grade point average
above 3.25.

Several students attending the din-
ner said they were inspired by the sto-
ries and accomplishments of the alum.
"It's just amazing hearing the class
of '31 talk," Engineering senior and
scholarship winner Megan Flynn said.
"It's just really inspiring and makes
me want to be an engineer all over
again."
"When I was six or seven years
old, a distant relative came to visit
and he was a civil engineer, and so I
decided to be a civil engineer, for no
reason other than that," said Streeter,
who came to the University from
Marcellus.
"I was raised in a very small town. I
didn't know any engineers. It just
sounded glamorous and nothing ever
changed my mind," he added.
After graduation, Streeter worked
on the Hoover Dam and was a profes-
sor at the Illinois Institute of Technol-
ogy before returning to Ann Arbor as a
civil engineering professor.
"I love the place. It's a great school,
great conditions," said Streeter, who is
almost 93 years old.
At one point in time, he worked for
Dietle, who owns an engineering con-
sulting firm.
"I'll tell you, my family wanted me
to become a doctor, but I read about
the building of the Panama Canal. One
man did so much for a lot of people

over so many years, and so I decided
that I could do more as an engineer,"
Dietle said.
Anderson, identifying with Univer-
sity students, recalled the Michigan
football games he attended and the
battles he had with his landlords.
A 20-watt bulb caused an uproar
between him and his landlord, who he
described as a "real tightwad." After
he and his roommate requested a high-
er wattage bulb and his landlord
refused, they took matters into their
own hands, burning the bulb out pur-
posefully and then taking it to Detroit
Edison, which replaced it for free with
a 60-watt bulb.
"We had the 20-watt bulbs, but they
had to be burned out or no deal. Well,
my radio set had 300 watts of power. It
burnt out in a hurry," he said, adding
that the landlord removed the 60-watt
bulb and replaced it with another 20-
watt bulb. "We just went through the
process again and again."
The class has an annual dinner,
which along with being a homecom-
ing event, also serves as a chance for
generations of University engineers
to tell their tales and learn from their
elders.
"My years have carried me all over
the damn world. I've done a lot of
things and met a lot of people,"
Dietle said.

ISLAM
Continued from Page 1A
He added that since much of the
media portrayal of Islam and Mus-
lims is distorted, it is even more
important that Islam Awareness
Week exist both to teach non-Mus-
lims about the basic concepts of
Islam and also to show that Islam is
about peace.
Engineering junior Shuaib Mirza,
also a Muslim Student Association
member, stressed that Islam means
peace and has been a peaceful and
tolerant religion looking back
through history.
"If you look at Islamic history
you'll find that Islam has been very
tolerant to all the religions it has
governed and it's probably the most

tolerant to all religions ... nobody
mentions that," he said.
Mirza added he hopes people take
away from the week a sound under-
standing of Islam.
"Just to have a knowledge of a
religion that is the second largest
religion in the world and that their
fellow students follow - they have
friends that are Muslim, they deal
with Muslims everyday, so they
should have a sound knowledge in
who we are and what we believe and
our motivations," he said.
The first Islam Awareness Week
was organized in 1994 and held on
campuses around the country, with
the goal of providing information
regarding Islam's message and way
of life while clearing up possible
misconceptions.

IRAQ
Continued from Page 1A
we want to stop terrorism, we really
need to address the injustices in the
world. It breeds hatred."
There seemed to be a variety of
different reasons for protesting the
war.
"This is to support the Iraqi peo-
ple. It's important for Muslims to
support Iraqi people," Ann Arbor
resident Mahmoud Habeel said.
"From my side it's obvious there are
two reasons for fighting Iraq - oil
and long-term protection of Israel."
Aladin Abraham, who attended the
rally with Habeel, added, "When it
comes to the Mid-East, the capital
isn't Washington, it's Tel-Aviv."
There were a plethora of speakers

and performers including Congress-
woman Lynn Rivers (D-Ann Arbor)
and members of the band Funktelli-
gence.
"I stand for peace rather than
war," Rivers said. "Will I stand for
spending $200 billion on this folly
or will I use that money to educate
the American people?"
When everything was said and
done, the organizers said they felt
satisfied with attendance, conduct
and impact of the march. They
stressed the impetus for the march
didn't come from them, but the
community.
"People who were'not activists
themselves were calling us and ask-
ing if we were going to march,"
Camino said. "This tells me that we
have a large mainstream base."

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